Wanted: Research Assistants

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation seeks enrolled or incoming graduate students to work as research assistants starting in fall 2015.

The Rudin Center for Transportation at NYU’s Wagner School aims to strengthen our understanding of all modes of transportation through research, public forums, and educational programs. Current areas of focus include: Information technology and transportation systems, inequality and access to employment, urban bike share systems and the future of supercommuting.

RAs are responsible for assisting in background research, data analysis, writing, event planning, and web content, depending on organizational needs.

Candidates do not need direct job experience, but should be interested in transportation in cities. RAs must work a minimum of 12 hours per week.

Interested applicants should exhibit 2-3 of these skills:

  • Data analysis, terminology and applications
  • Knowledge of or experience in transportation planning
  • Strong writing skills
  • Ability to communicate with variety of stakeholders
  • Event planning and coordination
  • Policy research
  • PowerPoint/Keynote and presentation development
  • GIS and spatial analytics, including ArcGIS
  • WordPress
  • Microsoft Excel

Please highlight relevant skills and your degree of proficiency in your resume or cover letter.

To Apply

Interested candidates should email the required documents below as attachments to rudin [dot] center [at] nyu.edu with the subject line “RA Application.”

  1. Current resume
  2. Cover letter
  3. Writing sample (1-3 pages or URL)
  4. Portfolio of relevant web-based, design, programming, or data visualization work (not required)

 

New York University is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

 

Lily and Nolan hit the streets to chat it up with The Policy Shop
Research Assistants Lily and Nolan hit the streets to chat it up with The Policy Shop

Big Data Fest

The NYU Rudin Center presented our Transit Access and Jobs report and map at the NY Hall of Science’s Big Data Fest this weekend. Sarah Kaufman (Digital Manager) and Jorge Hernandez (Research Assistant) met a variety of people both casually and professionally interested in big data; many of them had stories about how their commutes affected their job opportunities.

Thanks to all who stopped by to talk!

Jorge Hernandez and a visitor at the NY Hall of Science
Jorge Hernandez and a visitor at the NY Hall of Science

New Citizens Budget Commission Report

A bold new Citizens Budget Commission report calls for vehicle-based fees to finance transit, among other thoughtful recommendations.

In sum:

This report examines the MTA’s current fiscal challenges and identifies options for funding its capital investment needs for the next five years. The analysis of these options includes consideration of how well measures to raise money for the MTA fit into a broader financing plan for the state’s entire transportation system, including its extensive road and bridge network. Specifically this report addresses two questions: (1) how much money does the MTA require to address its capital investment needs, and (2) from where should any requisite new money come?

Click here to read the report.

 

“Mean Streets 2014: Who We Lost, How They Lived”

Reflections from the excellent reporters at WNYC Radio on covering the 265 New Yorkers killed in traffic last year. Their work reminds us that traffic safety isn’t a concern for some New Yorkers, it is a concern for all New Yorkers.

Throughout 2014, WNYC tracked the 265 men, women and children killed in traffic crashes in New York City. Click here to see their stories. 

Farewell to Traffic Lights

Sarah Kaufman, Digital Manager, wants New Yorkers to prepare for change.

“In the coming decades, a familiar overhead sight—this one fully a product of the automobile age—may disappear. The disappearance of the familiar green, yellow, and red circles above our heads will mark a profound transformation in the way we move through cities.”

Sarah illustrates how cities are transitioning away from traffic lights in a new piece from Satellite Magazine. Read more and explore some of the questions involving this trend.

Unprecedented Action, Typical Storm

This afternoon, New Yorkers looking out their windows may wonder if the meteorologists who predicted last week’s Snowstorm Juno would be the “biggest snowstorm in the history of this city” simply got their dates wrong.  While the storm didn’t break weather records, it did prompt the breaking of another record. For the first time in its 110-year history, the MTA subway system was shut down because of snow.

After the snow settled on Tuesday afternoon, The New York Times, illustrated the multifaceted nature behind this historic decision:

“I would much rather be in a situation where we say we got lucky than one where we didn’t get lucky and somebody died,” Governor Andrew Cuomo said.

All subway service halted from 11pm Monday evening until 9am Tuesday morning. Travelers had virtually no options of getting around the city as cars were banned from driving city roads and bus and ferry service stopped.

Of the unprecedented precautions our Director Mitchell L. Moss said, “They were able to conjure a snowstorm that didn’t occur, we won a battle without an enemy.”

Big Data, Big Picture

Next City talks to two of our researchers, Anthony Townsend and Sarah Kaufman, about patterns in big data and challenges cities face in using it. And they ask, would you share your private data for the good of city planning planning? Well, would you?

“As the data accumulates, these traffic schemas acquire a third dimension: They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year.

They show a city changing not just from day to night, but from year to year. Using cellphone data, for example, “you can really see the story of how a metropolitan area has evolved, over the last decade,” says Anthony Townsend, the author of Smart Cities.

Many of these ideas are hypothetical, for the moment, because so-called “granular” data is so hard to come by…Corporate entities, like Uber’s pending data offering to Boston, don’t always meet researchers’ standards. “It’s going to be a lot of superficial data, and it’s not clear how usable it’ll be at this point,” explains Sarah Kaufman.”

Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods: A New Report

The NYU Rudin Center for Transportation announces the release of a new report: “Mobility, Economic Opportunity and New York City Neighborhoods,” focusing on the variations of job access by transit throughout New York City.

This research was supported by The Rockefeller Foundation and Google.

Job Access Map

From the Introduction:

“The ability of a public transportation network to physically link residents to jobs has become a central point of concern for urban policy in an era of uneven unemployment and rapidly changing job markets. The economy of New York City is unique in North America due to its high uptake of public transportation. Here, 56% of the population uses transit to reach work; an individual’s ability to access a job is largely a function of how well their neighborhood is served by the public transportation system. This report presents direct measurements of job access in New York City, and contrasts the levels of access that are experienced in the city’s many neighborhoods…

To improve economic opportunities citywide, the NYU Rudin Center recommends that policymakers increase the number of transportation modal options across the city, maximize use of existing transportation infrastructure, and foster the ability to work remotely. These solutions will benefit all New Yorkers’ access to job opportunities and economic improvement.”

Report maps by NYU Rudin Center, linepointpath and Datapolitan.

 

A Discussion on the Future of Digital Technology and Urban Mobility

On December 3, the Rudin Center held an event on “Re-Programming Mobility: What Do Smart Phones and Self-Driving Cars Mean for Future Cities?” which explored four forecasts of mobility, land use and transportation planning in U.S. metropolitan areas in 2030. A presentation of the Rudin Center’s recent report on digital innovation and transportation was presented by Senior Research Scientist Anthony Townsend, followed by commentary and insight from four invited panelists:

  • Robin Chase, Buzzcar
  • Stacey Hodge, New York City Department of Transportation
  • Greg Lindsay, Visiting Scholar, NYU Rudin Center
  • Benjamin De La Peña, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

A full run-down of the event can be found at NYU News.

http://wagner.nyu.edu/events/rudin-12-03-2014

Photos by Emily Rhodes and Jorge Hernandez

December Events: Transportation Futurism, Tech and Thought

Please join the NYU Rudin Center at three exciting events in December:

December 3, 9am: Re-Programming Mobility: What Do Smart Phones and Self-Driving Cars Mean for Future Cities?  Based on the report Re-Programming Mobility by Dr. Anthony Townsend, NYU Rudin Center Senior Researcher. For more information and to RSVP visit:  http://wagner.nyu.edu/events/rudin-12-03-2014

December 9, 6:30pm: Open in NYC: Open technology and tools for city government. Join Sarah Kaufman, NYU Rudin Center Digital Manager, and several other experts showcasing the latest location-based works in NYC, at Google NYC. RSVP here:  https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/open-in-nyc-tickets-12168378949

December 9th, 7:30pm: Cities +, Presented by the NYU Rudin Center and Satellite Magazine. Five lightning talks from transportation experts in video, data, ridership, collaborative planning and mapping at The Way Station in Prospect Heights. More information and RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/1489962491284066

We hope to see you on December 3rd or 9th at one of these fantastic events.

Artwork above by Jeff Ferzoco, linepointpath, for Re-Programming Mobility. 

 

Exploring challenges in transportation and infrastructure