Sarah Ludwig

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Planning

By appointment only
Not Pictured

Sarah Ludwig is founder and executive director of the Neighborhood Economic Development Advocacy Project (NEDAP), a nonprofit resource and advocacy center that provides legal, technical, and policy support to community groups organizing for economic justice in New York City. Ms. Ludwig has trained and counseled hundreds of New York groups on community reinvestment and fair access to credit, financial literacy, predatory lending, electronic benefits, financial modernization, and community development financial institutions. Ms. Ludwig is a graduate of Bryn Mawr College and received a joint degree in law and urban planning from New York University School of Law and NYU Wagner.

This course introduces graduate students to topics in community financial justice and strategies for achieving equitable community development. Students will examine ways that communities have organized to gain access to capital; methods and mechanisms to ensure equitable development; and technical tools needed to secure and retain community assets in lower income urban neighborhoods and communities of color. Students will learn about challenges and impediments that community organizations face, particularly in the contexts of lending and housing discrimination and the ongoing economic and foreclosure crises.

The course exposes students to a variety of perspectives, and students are expected to evaluate with a critical eye the validity and efficacy of all strategies. The course uses New York City neighborhoods as laboratories for observing

Download Syllabus

This course introduces graduate students to topics in community financial justice and strategies for achieving equitable community development. Students will examine ways that communities have organized to gain access to capital; methods and mechanisms to ensure equitable development; and technical tools needed to secure and retain community assets in lower income urban neighborhoods and communities of color. Students will learn about challenges and impediments that community organizations face, particularly in the contexts of lending and housing discrimination and the ongoing economic and foreclosure crises.

The course exposes students to a variety of perspectives, and students are expected to evaluate with a critical eye the validity and efficacy of all strategies. The course uses New York City neighborhoods as laboratories for observing

Download Syllabus