Diversity

Students Explore Diversity and Leadership as Part of the Wagner Leadership Academy Workshop Series

Students Explore Diversity and Leadership as Part of the Wagner Leadership Academy Workshop Series

Earlier this month, the NYU Wagner Leadership Academy (WLA) held its first of four sessions in the Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue. This initial workshop, led by Jamie L. O’Regan, Surabhi Lal, and Corey Blay, explored the issues of diversity both globally and domestically, as well as discussed the role of the Wagner community and our responsibility to collectively shape it.

The WLA is a collaboration between NYU Wagner's Student Activities, Career Services, and the NYU Leadership Initiative. This four-part workshop series is rooted in competency-based learning and is geared towards current Wagner students. Each workshop will focus on a different aspect of leadership development through interactive exercises, honest feedback, and meaningful dialogue. Built on the notion that leadership is a collaborative process and that we can help one another further our professional development, this is an important and exciting series that we encourage all students to attend.

As part of the first session on diversity, an art installation entitled "Hopes for Our Community" was given footing to showcase the ideas of our students, faculty, staff, and alumni. The exhibit, which we encourage everyone to continue adding to, will remain on display in the cafe area on the second floor of the Puck Building through November.

The next workshop series will focus on Authentic Leadership and take place on Thursday, December 4, 2014 from 5:00pm - 6:30pm in the Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue. Don’t miss this opportunity. RSVP at http://wagner.nyu.edu/events

"Forward 50" honors Berman Jewish Policy Archive's director

"Forward 50" honors Berman Jewish Policy Archive's director

Steven M. Cohen

"The Forward 50" consists of "people whose religious and cultural values propelled them to engage, create and lead in a decidedly Jewish voice." Among the newly announced honorees: GOP congressman Eric Cantor, Supreme Court Justice Elana Kagan, Google co-founder Sergey Brin - and sociologist Steven M. Cohen, Director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at NYU Wagner.

BJBA recently collaborated on a case study of the Jewish community in the U.S., entitled "Baby Boomers, Public Service, and Minority Communities."

"The Color Bind," Co-Authored by Erica Gabrielle Foldy, Debuts at NYU Wagner

"The Color Bind," Co-Authored by Erica Gabrielle Foldy, Debuts at NYU Wagner

Erica Gabrielle Foldy and Tamara R. Buckley’s The Color Bind: Talking (and Not Talking) About Race at Work investigates a stubborn American phenomenon: The taboo nature of race in our work places – and how to transcend it.

Just published by the Russell Sage Foundation, The Color Bind was the focus of a well-attended dialogue held at NYU Wagner on Feb. 26. The conversation included the co-authors as well as Melody Barnes, Senior Fellow at NYU Wagner and Vice Provost for Global Student Leadership Initiatives at New York University. Wagner and its Research Center for Leadership in Action (RCLA) co-sponsored the book launch. More than 125 people attended, filling all the seats in the Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue and enlivening the audience Q&A portion of the program.

Foldy is Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management at Wagner;  Buckley is Associate Professor of Counseling at Hunter College and Psychology at The Graduate Center, City University of New York.  Their in-depth book grew out of Foldy's direct observation, over many months, of child welfare workers at one social services agency. At first she anticipated that, given the nature of their work, child welfare case workers would bring discussions of race into their team meetings readily. Instead, she found “the color bind” operating in full force, blunting the creativity, morale, and effectiveness of the teams.

One team at the agency, however, broached race and ethnicity regularly, without signs of defensiveness or worries of recrimination. Professors Foldy and Buckley dug into what made this team unique, gleaning some crucial lessons for social service organizations, advocacy groups, public agencies, schools, health providers, and many others.

In any organization, be it in the nonprofit, public, or private sector, the journey out of “the color bind” begins with mindfulness by its leaders that race matters. That’s the initial step towards fostering an atmosphere where employees can discuss fraught topics freely, and where “cultural competency,” or having the skills to communicate about race, ethnicity, and culture, can be developed, the authors said.

“Race is ever-present,” said Buckley. “The taboo of it often keeps us quiet about it. What we’re trying to do is show the assets that race brings to us in all the different kinds of conversations that we have.”

Professor Buckley, who is African American, and Professor Foldy, who is white, surfaced their own sometimes-clashing perspectives about race during the writing process. But in crossing lines that often keep others separated, both of them found that they could deepen their knowledge and advance their shared mission.

Talking about race is rarely smooth or simple, Foldy explained. “If you are going to enter this territory, you have to live with the fact that you are going to make mistakes.”

The Color Bind is published by the Russell Sage Foundation.

 

       

APA Blog Spotlights "The Color Bind" Co-Authored by Professor Erica Foldy

APA Blog Spotlights "The Color Bind" Co-Authored by Professor Erica Foldy

The American Psychological Association-sponsored blog PsyCRITIQUES has not only written a highly favorable review  of “The Color  Bind: Talking (and Not Talking) About Race at Work,” by Erica Gabrielle Foldy, Associate Professor of Public and Nonpublic Management, NYU Wagner, and Tamara R. Buckley, Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling, CUNY, but the blog is also inviting readers currently to add their thoughts on the timely issues addressed by the book (published by Russell Sage Foundation, 2014).

Baltimore: Black and Beyond

Baltimore: Black and Beyond

In light of the recent events in Baltimore, MD, and around the country, the Wagner Black Student Association (BSA) hosted a forum on May 5 titled "Baltimore, Black and Beyond," to reflect, discuss, and provide direction for students and community members.

Following this event, BSA worked with the City of Baltimore to lead a service-learning trip to West Baltimore, MD. Graduate students from across NYU worked side-by-side with the Mondawmin Neighborhood Improvement Association to engage with local residents, help rebuild the community through service, and reflect on how to make sustainable impact.

In just five hours, participants planted a garden, talked with residents about community concerns, played games with youth, cleaned a major intersection and back alley, toured the neighborhood where the protests took place, visited the mall that was reported looted, viewed the CVS that was set on fire, and received a history lesson from a local community activist.

Residents are leading several positive efforts to rebuild the Baltimore community. BSA will continue to be involved in the community's rebuilding efforts for the days and months to come. To stay engaged, please email bsaeboard@nyu.edu.

 

 

Written by Quintin Hynes, MPA 2016

Black History Month Gallery Opening at NYU Wagner

Black History Month Gallery Opening at NYU Wagner

NYU Wagner’s 2015 Black History Month celebration kicked off with a new gallery exhibition and dialogue with the artists on February 17. 

“Two Artists Two Visions” showcases the work of Jacqueline Bishop, Visual Artist and Master Teacher of Liberal Studies at NYU Arts and Sciences, and Alex Merchant, Visual Artists and Assistant Director of Third Avenue Residence Hall for NYU. 

Over 120 guests came to hear the artists discuss their latest works. NYU Wagner student Beneque Cousin (MPA-HPAM 2017) moderated the conversation about how the artists' work has been influenced by their communities in Jamaica and the Midwest, respectively, and how the artists' personal explorations have evolved throughout their career. The exhibit will be on display on the 2nd floor of the Puck Building until April 24.

Since its debut in November 2005, The Gallery Space at NYU Wagner has hosted three to four annual exhibits for both established and emerging artists. The space is co-curated by NYU Gallatin’s interdisciplinary art adviser Ann Chwatsky and NYU Wagner’s resident curator Frankie Crescioni-Santoni. 

Community Reflection

Community Reflection

The grand jury decisions in the police killings of Michael Brown of Ferguson, MO., and Eric Garner of Staten Island, NY, were the catalysts for insights, reflections, and next-step brainstorming as the NYU Wagner community came together for an open-mike forum on December 9 facilitated by Wagner students Simone Andrews and Quintin Haynes.

The conversation among nearly 100 students, staff, and faculty reflected not only the deep emotions that many have voiced on the New York University campus and across the country at demonstrations, die-ins, and tributes to the victims and their families, but an opportunity to discuss policy solutions, as well.

Haynes said he was pleased that so many of Wagner’s faculty and staff were present at the gathering, engendering a collaborative spirit with students.

In recent weeks, NYU Wagner’s Black Student Association (BSA) released a letter to the Ferguson City Council, offering recommendations for improving police/community relations, along with an open letter to the Wagner community underscoring the need for dialogue aimed at bringing about change that matters.

The BSA has been holding a series of “Tea Talks” on topics such as Ferguson’s rippling effect throughout America, and the obstacles to collaboration and mutual support facing us all.

The continuing outcry has a strong resonance for many people within the Wagner community, and events are now being scheduled for the spring semester to continue the conversation.

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