Research

New Research: How Shall We Meet On-line? Choosing Between Videoconferencing and On-line Meetings

New Research: How Shall We Meet On-line? Choosing Between Videoconferencing and On-line Meetings

Roger Kropf's "How Shall We Meet On-line? Choosing Between Videoconferencing and On-line Meetings" was published in the Fall, 2002 Edition of the Journal of Healthcare Information Management. This article describes what videoconferencing and on-line meeting technologies are available now, and suggests criteria for selecting which one to use.

New Study by NYU Wagner Prof. Karen Grépin Looks at Flow of Ebola Donor Funds

New Study by NYU Wagner Prof. Karen Grépin Looks at Flow of Ebola Donor Funds

Of all the donations pledged by governments, companies, foundations, and private individuals to fight Ebola, only $1.09 billion—or about 40 percent—have been paid in full and put to use, according to new research from Karen Grépin, Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy at NYU Wagner.

In “International donations to the Ebola virus outbreak: too little, too late?” – published by the British Medical Journal on Feb. 3 – Professor Grépin scrutinizes international donations tracked by the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. She writes that if disbursement of funds had come more quickly to the most hard-hit countries, then the spread of the virus could have been less far-reaching.

Professor Grépin talks about her research in an interview with the BMJ. Her article has drawn widespread public attention. News and magazine outlets such as the New Republic, NBC News, the Daily Mail, Reuters, and Time, among many others around the world, have reported and discussed her findings.

New Study Co-Authored by Prof. John Billings Shows Who Uses Emergency Departments Frequently

New Study Co-Authored by Prof. John Billings Shows Who Uses Emergency Departments Frequently

           While it has often been said that the most frequent users of overburdened hospital emergency departments are mentally ill substance abusers, a study out today (Dec. 3) by researchers from NYU Wagner and the University of California, San Francisco, has found that this belief is unfounded – an “urban legend.”

            Co-authored by John Billings of NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and Maria C. Raven of the University of California and published in the December issue of Health Affairs, the new analysis of hospital emergency department (ED) use in New York City by Medicaid patients reveals that conditions related to substance abuse and mental illness are responsible for a small share of the emergency department visits by frequent ED users, and that ED use accounts for a small portion of these patients’ total Medicaid expenditures. However, according to the study, frequent emergency department users have a substantial burden of disease, often having multiple chronic conditions and many hospitalizations.

           The article, “Dispelling an Urban Legend: Frequent Emergency Department Users Have Substantial Burden of Disease,” analyzes data on emergency department visits by 212,259 New York City residents who received their first emergency department care in 2007. The researchers reviewed each patient’s eligibility, ED use, Medicaid fee-for-service spending, and diagnostic history. The main part of the analysis covers the three years before each patient’s first visit to a hospital emergency department, the 12 months after the initial visit, and the subsequent two years. As the authors write, “contrary to urban legend, most repeat users in the study did appear to have relatively strong linkage to ambulatory care, at least as evidenced by their high rates of primary and specialty care visits. Except for ED users with ten or more visits in the index [initial] year, ambulatory care visit rates actually exceeded ED visit rates.”

          While hospital emergency department use is not a major cost driver for the Medicaid program, an improved understanding of Medicaid beneficiaries who frequently obtain ED care could help inform the current policy debate over how to meet the significant needs of this population and how to contain Medicaid expenditures, according to the researchers.

          Importantly, the analysis indicates that “predictive modeling” based on information provided at a patient’s initial ED visit could be used to identify individuals likely to return to theemergency department frequently. Billings and Raven write that the predictive modeling approach, coupled with an understanding of the characteristics of frequent ED users, offers health care institutions an opportunity to design targeted, cross-system health care interventions to keep future high users from having to return to the hospital for emergency care.

         “It is also important to note that only a small number of ‘frequent fliers’ are ultra-high ED users or serial high ED users, with frequent ED use year after year,” Billings and Raven assert. “To date, most thinking by providers and policy makers about the problem of frequent ED users has focused on these serial users, but the overwhelming majority of frequent users have only episodic periods of high ED use, instead of consistent use over multiple years. More needs to be learned about these patients (they, too, could be interviewed in the ED), and predictive modeling and quick intervention will probably be critical since their repeat ED use is unlikely to continue over time.”

         To learn more about Professor Billings' study, see "Who's Crowding the ER" on the NYU public affairs website.

New Working Paper: Analysis of the Effects of Microfinance on Poverty Reduction

New Working Paper: Analysis of the Effects of Microfinance on Poverty Reduction

This paper was prepared by Jonathan Morduch and Barbara Haley for the Canadian International Development Agency, November 2001. A focused review of the microfinance literature was conducted to evaluate recent publications regarding the impact of microfinance on poverty reduction. The report concludes that there is ample evidence to support the positive impact of microfinance on poverty reduction.

New Working Paper: Derivative Financial Instruments and Nonprofit Health Care Providers

New Working Paper: Derivative Financial Instruments and Nonprofit Health Care Providers

Louis J. Stewart, Assistant Professor of Health Financial Management at NYU Wagner, and Vincent Owhoso, Associate Professor of Accounting at Bentley College, conduct an exploratory study of derivative financial instruments use among U.S nonprofit hospitals and health systems.

New Working Paper: Does the Structure and Composition of the Board Matter? The case of Nonprofit Organizations

New Working Paper: Does the Structure and Composition of the Board Matter? The case of Nonprofit Organizations

Katherine O'Regan and Sharon Oster (Yale Management School) use data collected with the New York City Comptroller's Office to present empirical results of the effects of board structure and composition on individual board level performance for nonprofit contractors. They are able to examine in relatively fine, micro detail, the way in which individual board member behavior is influenced by board structure, the strength of the chief executive of the organization, and individual demographics.

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