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"Best Book" on public administration

"Best Book" on public administration

Congratulations to NYU Wagner Professor Paul Light. He is the recipient of the American Political Science Association's 2010 Herbert A. Simon Best Book Award for his brilliant and insightful study, "A Government Ill Executed: The Decline of the Federal Service and How to Reverse It" (Harvard University Press, 2008). According to the Association, Light's work constitutes the best book on public administration in the last 3 to 5 years that has made a significant contribution to public administration. The award is conferred annually.

Dr. Light is the Paulette Goddard Professor of Public Service at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School for Public Service, and founding principal investigator of the Organizational Performance Initiative based at the school. Among his current activities, he writes an influential column on the federal service for The Washington Post, entitled "Light on Leadership."

 

"Beyond the Wal-Martization of Immigration"

"Beyond the Wal-Martization of Immigration"

In a guest commentary, NYU Wagner Professor Natasha Iskander and fellow researcher Nichola Lowe, of the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, writes on the role scholars can play in reshaping the political dialogue and debate about immigration and its impact on the national economy. The piece is hosted by the Institute for the Study of the Americas at UNC-Chapel Hill. (See, too, a recent study coauthored by Iskander, entitled "Hidden Talent: Skill Formation and Labor Market Incorporation of Latino Immigrants in the United States.")

On Friday, April 8, 2011, meanwhile, Professor Iskander visited the World Bank in Washington, D.C., to deliver a lecture about her recently published book, Creative State: Forty Years of Migration and Development Policy in Morocco and Mexico

"Code for Change" Honors New Digital Apps with a Public Purpose

"Code for Change" Honors New Digital Apps with a Public Purpose

Competition expo (Oct. 12).

A digital app that makes it possible for trained citizen responders to work together in teams as soon as a civil disaster strikes is the winner of the Grand Prize awarded by “Code for Change,” a tech competition at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University.
 
New York City agencies and nonprofit organizations posed technical challenges to self-formed teams of developers, designers, and specialists who participated in the Code for Change competition. The Grand Prize winner is the Community Emergency Response Team (CERT), which needed an easy-to-use app to help facilitate communication and information exchange among volunteer emergency responders in the immediate wake of a disaster.

Code for Change gave the participants two weeks instead of a typical hackathon’s 24 to 36 hours to identify real, sustainable solutions to questions of public importance. The event also marked the first time that a big-city hackathon included challenges from both government agencies and nonprofit organizations.

This was the first time, too, that four major tech nonprofits – Code for America, One Economy, NPower, and Blue Ridge Foundation New York – joined in co-partnering a hackathon, together with NYU Wagner – with sponsorships from Motorola Mobility Foundation, Liquidnet, Centre for Social for Social Innovations, Notable, General Assembly, and Zurb.

A second Code for Change award, the Change Prize, was given to the New York City Campaign Finance Board for an app that provides citizens with information they can use to engage with the democratic process, and fosters higher voter participation in elections.

Code for Change awarded its Promise Prize to the CUNY Institute for Software Design and Development for an app that enables students to exchange, rather than buy, textbooks – and defrays their higher-education costs.

Code for Change’s Popular Choice Prize was awarded to Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship for a new platform enabling middle and high school students to write and share their own book reviews with one another, and creating a space for online reader discussion groups about literature.

The awardees – who were eligible for a total of $10,000 in cash, mentor lunches, General Assembly classes, Zurb’s web design audit, and free workspace at the Center for Social Innovation – were selected by a panel of seven judges.

"FolkloRican" Exhibit Draws Attention

"FolkloRican" Exhibit Draws Attention

"Iluminado" by Pepe Villegas

With "FolkloRican," the latest—and current—exhibit showing in the Gallery Space at NYU Wagner, renowned multi-media artist Pepe Villegas presents a 10-piece collection of oil paintings that delve into an intriguing archive of personal and cultural memories referencing his Puerto Rican upbringing. Ranging from striking representational and semi-representational portraiture to abstract and symbolism-rich canvases, this highly evocative and criollista sampling is deeply rooted in cultural pride, introspective contemplation, and national nostalgia.

"FolkloRican," which opened Nov. 17, 2010, and continues through January 31, 2011, commemorates Latino Heritage Month at New York University and is co-presented by NYU Wagner, the Latino Studies Program, the Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies, and NYU Steinhardt. Curated by Wagner's Frank Crescioni-Santoni, the exhibition drew extensive coverage in New York City's El Diario newspaper (November 28, 2010).

Please note: the Gallery Space at NYU Wagner - at 295 Lafayette Street, 2nd Floor, will be closed Dec. 24th through Jan. 3rd. For more information, such as hours and directions, please call 212.998.7400.

 

"Forward 50" honors Berman Jewish Policy Archive's director

"Forward 50" honors Berman Jewish Policy Archive's director

Steven M. Cohen

"The Forward 50" consists of "people whose religious and cultural values propelled them to engage, create and lead in a decidedly Jewish voice." Among the newly announced honorees: GOP congressman Eric Cantor, Supreme Court Justice Elana Kagan, Google co-founder Sergey Brin - and sociologist Steven M. Cohen, Director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at NYU Wagner.

BJBA recently collaborated on a case study of the Jewish community in the U.S., entitled "Baby Boomers, Public Service, and Minority Communities."

"Society flies blind when it comes to health care…"

"Society flies blind when it comes to health care…"

In the U.S. and England, the financial bottom line tends to drive decisions about how to value medical treatments within a competitive health system, and reconfigurations and reforms are usually led by administrators and politicians, not by physicians. “To improve the health care system,” argue NYU Wagner Professor John Billings and two fellow scholars writing for the Journal of the American Medical Association, “physicians should take a firm lead: a large portion of the activities most likely to have an impact on improving outcomes and quality are embedded in the care setting provided by physicians interacting directly with patients.” But is it likely that physicians will take the initiative and foster positive-sum competition for health-gain value to patients? For the answer, read the full article by Prof. Billings, Jennifer Dixon, and Cyril Chantler by clicking the link below.

Prof. Billings, Associate Professor of Health Policy and Public Service at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University, teaches in the area of health policy. He is principal investigator on numerous projects to assess the performance of the safety net for vulnerable populations and to understand the nature and extent of barriers to optimal health for vulnerable populations. Much of his work has involved analysis of patterns of hospital admission and emergency room visits as a mechanism to evaluate access barriers to outpatient care and to assess the performance of the ambulatory care delivery system. He has also examined the characteristics of high cost Medicaid patients in to help in designing interventions to improve care and outcomes for these patients. Parallel work in the United Kingdom has involved creating an algorithm for the National Health Service to identify patients at risk of future hospital admissions and designing interventions to improve care for these high risk patients. As a founding member of the Foundation for Informed Decision Making, Professor Billings is helping to provide patients with a clearer mechanism for understanding and making informed decisions about a variety of available treatments.

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