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"There's nothing comparable to public service" - Former Mayor Edward I. Koch [Video]

"There's nothing comparable to public service" - Former Mayor Edward I. Koch [Video]

Former New York City Mayor Edward I. Koch, who died in the early-morning hours Feb. 1, led an informative, entertaining hour of discussion in the fall of 2010 at NYU Wagner about his eventful three terms at City Hall – years that sparked a remarkable turnaround in the condition and character of much of New York City, noticeable to this day.

Joining Koch was Jonathan Soffer, NYU Polytechnic associate professor of history and author of a critically acclaimed biography, Ed Koch and the Rebuilding of New York City (Columbia University Press, 2010), as well as Wagner's dean Ellen Schall, who introduced Koch as “my mayor," noting that she had worked extensively for city government, including as the commissioner of juvenile justice.

“City government, I say to all my students, is really the most amazing opportunity,” she commented. “It allows you to work on incredibly important issues, have much more authority as a young person that you have any reason to have, and make a huge amount of difference.”

Koch spoke passionately about the merits of embarking on a career in public service.

“There’s nothing comparable to public service,” he said. “More than saying ‘How am I doin’?’ … more than that I said 10,000 times that public service is the most noble profession if it’s done honestly and if it’s done well. And that’s why people serve. There’s nothing like it.”

In this videotape of the Oct. 14, 2010 conversation at Wagner, the former mayor begins speaking at marker 15:48.

 

 

"We need more housing"

"We need more housing"

Wagner�s Ingrid Gould Ellen was interviewed for the Bloomberg Administration�s PLANYC2030 report about the planning implications arising from rapid population growth, aging infrastructure and environmental pressures anticipated during the next quarter-century. Professor Ellen�s remarks focus on the growing demand for housing. She is codirector of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, a joint center between the NYU School of Law and the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. The Furman Center is a leading academic research center devoted to the public policy aspects of land use, real estate development and housing. Each year, it produces a widely read reach, the State of New York City�s Housing and Neighborhoods. Among the other resources hosted by the center�s website is http://plannyc.com, an independent source of information about pending land use decisions that was developed by Jordan Anderson as part of his Master of Urban Planning Capstone project at Wagner. To see the PLANYC2030 video, go here.

"Welcome Back" Wagner Social

"Welcome Back" Wagner Social

Stop by to catch up with old friends and meet new ones, swap winter break stories, and hang out with faculty and administrators.

'Code For Change' Tech Competition Launched to Design New Apps for the Public Good

'Code For Change' Tech Competition Launched to Design New Apps for the Public Good

In partnership with the largest organizations supporting technological development in the nonprofit sector, the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University will launch a new competition in September, challenging tech developers to design new applications to address some of the most pressing public issues facing New Yorkers.

The school and its partners—One Economy, Code for America, NPower and Blue Ridge Foundation—have begun evaluating major challenges from government agencies and nonprofits seeking to enter the “Code For Change” competition. Team formation begins on September 28, and prizes include $10,000 in cash to support application development, VC and mentor lunches and potential support from local foundations.

Code for Change will be a twist on the traditional 24- or 36-hour hackathon, because participating developers will spend two weeks working on their concepts, culminating in the judging at NYU Wagner on Friday, October 12.

Code for Change will look for tech applications that will lead to improvements with a broad public purpose, be they in education, emergency readiness, voting, social services, or other areas of public interest and public service.

Code for Change is made possible by generous support from Motorola Mobility Foundation and Liquidnet.

Anyone interested in entering the contest can create challenges, join teams, and view rules and other details at www.applicationsforgood.org, a platform for designers created by the global nonprofit One Economy.

 

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