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'Code For Change' Tech Competition Launched to Design New Apps for the Public Good

'Code For Change' Tech Competition Launched to Design New Apps for the Public Good

In partnership with the largest organizations supporting technological development in the nonprofit sector, the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University will launch a new competition in September, challenging tech developers to design new applications to address some of the most pressing public issues facing New Yorkers.

The school and its partners—One Economy, Code for America, NPower and Blue Ridge Foundation—have begun evaluating major challenges from government agencies and nonprofits seeking to enter the “Code For Change” competition. Team formation begins on September 28, and prizes include $10,000 in cash to support application development, VC and mentor lunches and potential support from local foundations.

Code for Change will be a twist on the traditional 24- or 36-hour hackathon, because participating developers will spend two weeks working on their concepts, culminating in the judging at NYU Wagner on Friday, October 12.

Code for Change will look for tech applications that will lead to improvements with a broad public purpose, be they in education, emergency readiness, voting, social services, or other areas of public interest and public service.

Code for Change is made possible by generous support from Motorola Mobility Foundation and Liquidnet.

Anyone interested in entering the contest can create challenges, join teams, and view rules and other details at www.applicationsforgood.org, a platform for designers created by the global nonprofit One Economy.

 

'Faith Without Fear'

'Faith Without Fear'

The acclaimed international journalist, activist and author Irshad Manji visited the Puck Building's Skylight Ballroom on the snowy evening of March 5 to discuss her absorbing life as a "Muslim refusnik" and the challenges facing Muslim women around the world.

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

'Nest' Program for Autistic Kids Grows

Dorothy Siegel of NYU's Institute for Education and Social Policy helped the city Department of Education to create the "Nest" program for autistic children in 2003. According to a May 25, 2007, article in the New York Daily News, this successful program, which puts kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the same class with other students, is growing. Come September, it will be available to 200 kids. Once it is implemented across the city, it could benefit as many as 2,000 children.

Founded in 1995, the Institute for Education and Social Policy is a partnership between the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. It conducts scientific research about U.S. education and related social policy issues to help inform educational institutions about the effectiveness of instructional programs, the impact of school reform initiatives, and the relationships between academic achievement, school finance and socio-economic and demographic factors such as poverty, ethnicity and immigration status. It is led by Wagner Professors Amy Ellen Schwartz (director) and Leanna Stiefel (associate director).

To read the article, click below.

'Operation Impact' in the News

'Operation Impact' in the News

Dennis Smith, NYU Wagner Associate Professor for Public Policy, was recently interviewed about New York City policing and his study of the New York Police Department's "Operation Impact" by the BBC and, separately, by a Brazilian news program (go to link below, click video box No. 2, then click new video titled "Tolerencia"). The interviews are part of the elevated profile that his recent research work on "Operation Impact," a method of hot-spot policing, has received. Professor Smith's expertise was also called upon by The New York Times. The newspaper interviewed him in December, 2007, about the overall effectiveness of the policing program (link to the article below).

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