Erica Gabrielle Foldy

Erica Gabrielle Foldy
Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management

Professor Foldy is an Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management at the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. She is Faculty Co-Director of the Research Center for Leadership in Action, based at Wagner, and Affiliated Faculty with the Center for Gender in Organizations at the Simmons School of Management in Boston.

Professor Foldy's research addresses the question: What enables and inhibits working and learning together across potential divisions like race and gender, profession or differences of opinion?  She is interested in how cognitive processes, like framing and sensemaking, affect our ability to connect with others, and how leaders act as "sensegivers" to affect their constituents' capacity for joint work.

Professor Foldy is co-author, with Tamara Buckley, of the book The Color Bind: Talking (and not Talking) about Race at Work, published by Russell Sage.  She also co-edited, with Robin Ely and Maureen Scully, the Reader in Gender and Organizations.  In addition, she has more than three dozen papers in a variety of journals and edited volumes.

Prior to her Ph.D. program, Professor Foldy worked for 15 years with nonprofit organizations addressing foreign policy, women’s rights, and occupational health and safety. She has consulted on strategic planning and organization development to a wide range of nonprofit groups. She holds a BA from Harvard College and a PhD from Boston College and was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Harvard Business School in 2002-03. During the 2007-08 academic year, she was a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Semester Course
Fall 2014 PADM-GP.2129.001 Race, Identity and Inclusion in Organizations

This course brings together a wide range of thinking and scholarship about race and identity to encourage learning about what race is, why it matters, and racial dynamics in organizations and how best to address them. (In this description, “race” is used as a shorthand for the interconnected complex of race, ethnicity, culture and color, understanding that we will be careful to distinguish among them in the course itself.) While recognizing the importance of intersectionality and other markers of difference such as gender and class, the course focuses on race for two reasons: 1) it is generally the most charged dimension of diversity in the United States, the most difficult to discuss and, therefore, the topic we most often avoid, and 2) it has the greatest impact on life chances and opportunities: race is often the best predictor of income, wealth, education, health, employment and other important measures of well-being. Because the impact of race is highly contextual, we will focus on the United States, although our lens will broaden at different points. The course will roughly divide into two parts. The first part will address the phenomenon of race more broadly, while the second half will look more closely at organizations. It will begin with theoretical understandings of what race is and how it is distinguished from ethnicity, culture and color. Then we will explore the dynamics of racism, discrimination and stereotypes, followed by research on the impact of race on individuals and groups. The intricate connections to gender and class will be our next topics. In the second half, we will address how race influences, and is influenced by, organizational dynamics. This will include classes on discrimination and racism in organizations, traditional approaches to “managing” diversity, alternative approaches that emphasize self-awareness, learning and mutuality, and particular concerns related to public service contexts like health care and philanthropy.


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Spring 2014 PADM-GP.2135.001 Developing Human Resources

Designed for public and non-profit managers rather than human resource professionals, this course gives a broad overview of HR dynamics and responsibilities. It will cover basic HR functions such as recruitment, career development, performance appraisal and rewards, providing feedback and job design. It will also explore current issues within HR management, which could include diversity and identity at work, the role of unions, or other topics. The course will include practical application through case discussions and reflection on students? work experiences. While it will focus on values-based organizations, it will compare HR practices in the public, non-profit and for-profit sectors.


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Fall 2013 PADM-GP.2129.001 Race, Identity and Inclusion in Organizations

This course brings together a wide range of thinking and scholarship about race and identity to encourage learning about what race is, why it matters, and racial dynamics in organizations and how best to address them. (In this description, “race” is used as a shorthand for the interconnected complex of race, ethnicity, culture and color, understanding that we will be careful to distinguish among them in the course itself.) While recognizing the importance of intersectionality and other markers of difference such as gender and class, the course focuses on race for two reasons: 1) it is generally the most charged dimension of diversity in the United States, the most difficult to discuss and, therefore, the topic we most often avoid, and 2) it has the greatest impact on life chances and opportunities: race is often the best predictor of income, wealth, education, health, employment and other important measures of well-being. Because the impact of race is highly contextual, we will focus on the United States, although our lens will broaden at different points. The course will roughly divide into two parts. The first part will address the phenomenon of race more broadly, while the second half will look more closely at organizations. It will begin with theoretical understandings of what race is and how it is distinguished from ethnicity, culture and color. Then we will explore the dynamics of racism, discrimination and stereotypes, followed by research on the impact of race on individuals and groups. The intricate connections to gender and class will be our next topics. In the second half, we will address how race influences, and is influenced by, organizational dynamics. This will include classes on discrimination and racism in organizations, traditional approaches to “managing” diversity, alternative approaches that emphasize self-awareness, learning and mutuality, and particular concerns related to public service contexts like health care and philanthropy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2013 PADM-GP.2135.001 Developing Human Resources

Designed for public and non-profit managers rather than human resource professionals, this course gives a broad overview of HR dynamics and responsibilities. It will cover basic HR functions such as recruitment, career development, performance appraisal and rewards, providing feedback and job design. It will also explore current issues within HR management, which could include diversity and identity at work, the role of unions, or other topics. The course will include practical application through case discussions and reflection on students? work experiences. While it will focus on values-based organizations, it will compare HR practices in the public, non-profit and for-profit sectors.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2013 PADM-GP.2129.001 Race, Identity and Inclusion in Organizations

This course brings together a wide range of thinking and scholarship about race and identity to encourage learning about what race is, why it matters, and racial dynamics in organizations and how best to address them. (In this description, “race” is used as a shorthand for the interconnected complex of race, ethnicity, culture and color, understanding that we will be careful to distinguish among them in the course itself.) While recognizing the importance of intersectionality and other markers of difference such as gender and class, the course focuses on race for two reasons: 1) it is generally the most charged dimension of diversity in the United States, the most difficult to discuss and, therefore, the topic we most often avoid, and 2) it has the greatest impact on life chances and opportunities: race is often the best predictor of income, wealth, education, health, employment and other important measures of well-being. Because the impact of race is highly contextual, we will focus on the United States, although our lens will broaden at different points. The course will roughly divide into two parts. The first part will address the phenomenon of race more broadly, while the second half will look more closely at organizations. It will begin with theoretical understandings of what race is and how it is distinguished from ethnicity, culture and color. Then we will explore the dynamics of racism, discrimination and stereotypes, followed by research on the impact of race on individuals and groups. The intricate connections to gender and class will be our next topics. In the second half, we will address how race influences, and is influenced by, organizational dynamics. This will include classes on discrimination and racism in organizations, traditional approaches to “managing” diversity, alternative approaches that emphasize self-awareness, learning and mutuality, and particular concerns related to public service contexts like health care and philanthropy.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2012 CAP-GP.3116.003
Spring 2010 PADM-GP.2135.001 Developing Human Resources

Designed for public and non-profit managers rather than human resource professionals, this course gives a broad overview of HR dynamics and responsibilities. It will cover basic HR functions such as recruitment, career development, performance appraisal and rewards, providing feedback and job design. It will also explore current issues within HR management, which could include diversity and identity at work, the role of unions, or other topics. The course will include practical application through case discussions and reflection on students? work experiences. While it will focus on values-based organizations, it will compare HR practices in the public, non-profit and for-profit sectors.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 CAP-GP.3117.003
Fall 2009 CAP-GP.3116.003
  Projects
Provide Support to Build a National Pipeline of Change-Makers for the Social Sector
Description
Program to provide comprehensive leadership development training to NYU cohort of dual degree students through academic, professional and social gatherings designed to build community, strengthen connectivity and prepare 30-40 NYU graduate students of color annually for social sector leadership
Issue Advocacy Lab
Description
The goal of Issue Advocacy Lab (Advocacy Lab for short) is to create a course providing students with the opportunity to engage in real-time organizing and advocacy on behalf of a particular issue campaign -- a robust form of service learning. Along with reading about how to engage in social change efforts, students would actually contribute to a particular campaign, through activities that could include background research on the issue and the contextual landscape, developing strategy, conducting outreach such as doorknocking and web-based approaches, and organizing community meetings or educational events. These activities would take place in the context of a course in which students would also engage in more traditional pedagogical activities, including readings, case studies, outside speakers and written assignments. While the core of Advocacy Lab will be classroom learning, the experience outside the classroom is the central innovation of the course, adding a novel component to Wagner’s already existing clinical curriculum.
Date Publication/Paper
2014

Foldy, Erica Gabrielle and Buckley, Tamara R. 2014. The Color Bind: Talking (and not Talking) about Race at Work Russell Sage Press
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Abstract

Since the 1960s, the dominant model for fostering diversity and inclusion in the United States has been the “color blind” approach, which emphasizes similarity and assimilation and insists that people should be understood as individuals, not as members of racial or cultural groups. This approach is especially prevalent in the workplace, where discussions about race and ethnicity are considered taboo. Yet, as widespread as “color blindness” has become, many studies show that the practice has damaging repercussions, including reinforcing the existing racial hierarchy by ignoring the significance of racism and discrimination. In The Color Bind, workplace experts Erica Foldy and Tamara Buckley investigate race relations in office settings, looking at how both color blindness and what they call “color cognizance” have profound effects on the ways coworkers think and interact with each other.

Based on an intensive two-and-a-half-year study of employees at a child welfare agency, The Color Bind shows how color cognizance—the practice of recognizing the profound impact of race and ethnicity on life experiences while affirming the importance of racial diversity—can help workers move beyond silence on the issue of race toward more inclusive workplace practices. Drawing from existing psychological and sociological research that demonstrates the success of color-cognizant approaches in dyads, workgroups and organizations, Foldy and Buckley analyzed the behavior of work teams within a child protection agency. The behaviors of three teams in particular reveal the factors that enable color cognizance to flourish. While two of the teams largely avoided explicitly discussing race, one group, “Team North,” openly talked about race and ethnicity in team meetings. By acknowledging these differences when discussing how to work with their clients and with each other, the members of Team North were able to dig into challenges related to race and culture instead of avoiding them. The key to achieving color cognizance within the group was twofold: It required both the presence of at least a few members who were already color cognizant, as well as an environment in which all team members felt relatively safe and behaved in ways that strengthened learning, including productively resolving conflict and reflecting on their practice.

The Color Bind provides a useful lens for policy makers, researchers and practitioners pursuing in a wide variety of goals, from addressing racial disparities in health and education to creating diverse and inclusive organizations to providing culturally competent services to clients and customers By foregrounding open conversations about race and ethnicity, Foldy and Buckley show that institutions can transcend the color bind in order to better acknowledge and reflect the diverse populations they serve.

2013

Rudolph, J. W., Foldy, E. G. et al. 2013. Helping Without Harming: The Instructor’s Feedback Dilemma in Debriefing—A Case Study Stimulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. October 2013 - Volume 8 - Issue 5 - p 304-316. doi: 10.1097/SIH.0b013e318294854e
Abstract

Introduction

Simulation instructors often feel caught in a task-versus-relationship dilemma. They must offer clear feedback on learners’ task performance without damaging their relationship with those learners, especially in formative simulation settings. Mastering the skills to resolve this dilemma is crucial for simulation faculty development.

Methods

We conducted a case study of a debriefer stuck in this task-versus-relationship dilemma. Data: The “2-column case” captures debriefing dialogue and instructor’s thoughts and feelings or the “subjective experience.” Analysis: The “learning pathways grid” guides a peer group of faculty in a step-by-step, retrospective analysis of the debriefing. The method uses vivid language to highlight the debriefer’s dilemmas and how to surmount them.

Results

The instructor’s initial approach to managing the task-versus-relationship dilemma included (1) assuming that honest critiques will damage learners, (2) using vague descriptions of learner actions paired with guess-what-I-am-thinking questions, and (3) creating a context she worried would leave learners feeling neither safe nor clear how they could improve. This case study analysis identified things the instructor could do to be more effective including (1) making generous inferences about the learners’ qualities, (2) normalizing the challenges posed by the simulation, (3) assuming there are different understandings of what it means to be a team.

Conclusions

There are key assumptions and ways of interacting that help instructors resolve the task-versus-relationship dilemma. The instructor can then provide honest feedback in a rigorous yet empathic way to help sustain good or improve suboptimal performance in the future.

2012

Ospina, S., Foldy, E. G., El Hadidy, W., Dodge, J., Hofmann-Pinilla, A., & Su, C. 2012. Social Change Leadership as Relational Leadership. In Social Change Leadership as Relational Leadership. In Uhl-Bien, M., and S. Ospina (eds.) Advancing Relational Leadership Theory. Information Age Publishers.

Foldy, E.G. 2012. Something of collaborative manufacture: The construction of race and gender identities in organizations Journal of Applied Behavioral Science

2010

Buckley, Tamara R. Foldy, Erica Gabrielle 2010. A pedagogical model for increasing race-related multicultural counseling competency  2010.  The Counseling Psychologist 38 (5): 691-713.
Abstract

Research suggests advances in students’ multicultural competence following multicultural counseling training. Increasingly, however, multicultural counseling courses have emphasized self awareness, which has increased the affective demands of these courses and student resistance to learning the material. This paper proposes a pedagogical model to enhance multicultural counseling training that attends both to content and process variables that may impact classroom learning. Its fundamental premise is that psychological safety, the belief that the classroom is safe for taking interpersonal risks, must be present for increasing knowledge and awareness around the charged, and often taboo, topics of race and culture in multicultural counseling training. The model integrates research from psychology, education, and management, including identity threat, culture-centered teaching practices, racial identity, and learning frames. The authors conclude with implications for classroom teaching.

 

 

Foldy, E. G. & Walters, J. 2010. A world without prisons: Improving prisoners' lives and transforming the justice system Justice Now Teaching Case. The Electronic Hallway and Research Center for Leadership in Action, 2004. Available from https://hallway.org.
Abstract

Cassandra Shaylor and Cynthia Chandler founded Justice Now in 2000. They push hard for prison abolition while advocating for better health care and conditions for prisoners in California's two largest women's prisons. They prioritize the leadership of prisoners, and offer interns the opportunity to work and meet with women inside prisons to learn firsthand about prisoners' human struggles as well as the policy implications of state sponsored violence. Their strategies include the following:

  • Conduct Legal Visits Inside Prisons to Expose and Challenge Human Rights Abuses: Shaylor, Chandler and the Justice Now interns spend as much time as possible inside prisons to uncover human rights abuses and organize to challenge them. They build relationships with women inside and become the eyes and ears to the outside.
  • Build Leadership Among Prisoners: Justice Now engages people in prison in the organization's work at every level. They also assist women who are already working as activists within the prisons.
  • Push the Prison Abolition Frontier: While Justice Now helps to improve health care and other conditions, they oppose prison reformation efforts. Instead they push for prison abolition.
  • Spread a Vision of a World Without Prisons: Through plays, music, oral histories and toolkits, the organization helps envision and promote a new approach to building lives, not locking people away.

In this leadership story Shaylor and Chandler, along with Justice Now interns and activists, describe their experiences in this case example.

Ospina, S. and E. G. Foldy 2010. Building Bridges from Margins: The Work of Leadership in Social Change Organizations The Leadership Quarterly  
Abstract

Attention to the relational dimensions of leadership represents a new frontier of leadership research and is an expression of the growing scholarly interest in the conditions that foster collective action within and across boundaries. This article explores the antecedents of collaboration from the perspective of social change organizations engaged in processes of collaborative governance. Using a constructionist lens, the study illuminates the question how do social change leaders secure the connectedness needed for collaborative work to advance their organization's mission? The article draws on data from a national, multi-year, multi-modal qualitative study of social change organizations and their leaders. These organizations represent disenfranchised communities which aspire to influence policy makers and other social actors to change the conditions that affect their members' lives. Narrative analysis of transcripts from in-depth interviews in 38 organizations yielded five leadership practices that foster strong relational bonds either within organizations or across boundaries with others. The article describes how these practices nurture interdependence either by forging new connections, strengthening existing ones, or capitalizing on strong ones.

Foldy, E.G. & Buckley, T.R. 2010. Re-creating Street Level Practice: The Role of Routines, Work Groups and Team Learning Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory
Abstract

Ample research documents the ubiquity of routines in street-level practice. Some individual-level and organizational-level research has explored how to break street-level routines, but little has looked at the work group level. Our study observed teams of state child welfare workers over 2.5 years, documenting whether they discarded old routines and learned new ones. Results suggest that team characteristics such as clear direction and reflective behaviors had greater influence on team learning than individual characteristics such as stress level, tenure, and educational level. We suggest that group-level factors be included in future models of what enables the re-creation of street-level practice.

2009

Foldy, E.G. Buckley, T.R. & Rivard. P. 2009. Power, Safety and Learning in Racially Diverse Groups Academy of Management Learning and Education 8(1) 2009

Ospina, S. and E. G. Foldy 2009. A critical Review of Race and Ethnicity in the Leadership Literature: Surfacing Context, Power and the Collective Dimensions of Leadership. The Leadership Quarterly, 20  
Abstract


Leadership studies focusing on race–ethnicity provide particularly rich contexts to illuminate the human condition as it pertains to leadership. Yet insights about the leadership experience of people of color from context-rich research within education, communications and black studies remain marginal in the field. Our framework integrates these, categorizing reviewed studies according to the effects of race–ethnicity on perceptions of leadership, the effects of race–ethnicity on leadership enactments, and actors' approach to the social reality of race–ethnicity. The review reveals a gradual convergence of theories of leadership and theories of race–ethnicity as their relational dimensions are increasingly emphasized. A shift in the conceptualization of race–ethnicity in relation to leadership is reported, from a constraint to a personal resource to a simultaneous consideration of its constraining and liberating capacity. Concurrent shifts in the treatment of context, power, agency versus structure and causality are also explored, as are fertile areas for future research.

Foldy, E.G., Goldman, L. & Ospina, S. 2009. The leadership task of prompting cognitive shifts: Shaping perceptions of issues and constituencies to achieve public service goals. Public 18. (Published by ESADE Business School.)
Abstract

In summary, these exemplary non-profit organizations were often very strategic in how they framed problems, solutions and the people they served. This suggests that public organizations could also be more deliberate in their framing processes. Organizational leaders might want to talk explicitly about the shifts they are trying to create, and whether these fit together or act at cross purposes, in addition to how well they match the organization’s goals and mission. Prompting cognitive shifts is at the heart of public leadership.

2008

Ospina, S., Dodge, J., Foldy, E.G. & Hofmann, A. 2008. Taking the action turn: Lessons from bringing participation to qualitative research Handbook of Action Research, 2nd Edition.  2008

Taylor, Rudolph & Foldy, E.G. 2008. Teaching Reflective Practices in the Action Science/Action Inquiry Tradition: Key Stages, Concepts, and Practices Handbook of Action Research, 2nd Ed. Sage Publications,
Abstract

This chapter describes an approach for teaching reflective practice in the action science/action inquiry tradition. We offer a theoretical background for our approach and then break it down into three key stages: (1) understanding the social construction of reality; (2) recognizing one's own contribution to that construction; and (3) taking action to reshape that construction. We articulate key concepts (e.g. the ladder of inference and competing commitments) and tools (e.g. the change immunity map and the learning pathways grid) for each stage. We end with suggestions for assignments that integrate learning across stages and concepts. In short, we offer a conceptually grounded set of concrete practices for teaching reflective practice.

2007

Foldy, E.G., Goldman, L. & Ospina, S. 2007. Sensegiving and the Role of Cognitive Shifts In the Work of Leadership in Leadership Quarterly
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Abstract

Sensegiving -- shaping how people understand themselves, their work, and others engaged in that work -- is critical to the work of organizational leadership. We propose the cognitive shift, a change in how an organizational audience understands an important element of the organization's work, as a desired outcome of the sensegiving process. Organizations try to spur these shifts in two categories: about their issue and about their primary constituency, the population it is designed to serve or mobilize. This approach makes two contributions: It re-directs attention from individual leaders' behaviors and characteristics to the work of leadership, as opposed to the agents through which it is carried out. Second, it operationalizes the intangible process of meaning-making by breaking it down into discrete units that are relatively equivalent and, therefore, comparable, providing a systematic way to analyze and map cognitive leadership processes.

2006

Foldy, E.G. 2006. Dueling Schemata: Dialectical Sensemaking About Gender Journal of Applied Behavioral Science Vol. 42, No. 3, 350-372.
Abstract

Recent scholarship has shown that, despite the broad representation of women in the workplace, gender inequities in organizations remain widespread. Because gender schema ”embedded ways of thinking about men and women” contribute to this phenomenon, addressing such mental models should be a part of gender equity initiatives. This article provides data that suggest that some individuals hold within themselves quite contradictory schemas of men and of women. It then illustrates how individuals can use these internal inconsistencies to push through superficial understandings of gender to more complex ones. By facilitating this learning process in training and other kinds of organizational events, change agents can strengthen organizational efforts to achieve gender equity.
2005

Creed, W.E.D. & Foldy, E.G. 2005. Out Front on the Issues: Explaining the Paradox of Resistance to Gay Stigma in Organizations A contribution to the symposium "Overcoming Barriers to Equality Among Diverse Sexual Orientations at Work." Academy of Management, Honolulu, HI,

Dodge, J., Ospina, S. & Foldy, E.G. 2005. Integrating Rigor and Relevance in Public Administration Scholarship: The Contribution of Narrative Inquiry Public Administration Review, Vol. 65, May/June, No.3, pp. 286.
Abstract

A traditional view of scholarly quality defines rigor as the application of method and assumes an implicit connection with relevance. But as an applied field, public administration requires explicit attention to both rigor and relevance. Interpretive scholars' notions of rigor demand an explicit inclusion of relevance as an integral aspect of quality. As one form of interpretive research, narrative inquiry illuminates how this can be done. Appreciating this contribution requires a deeper knowledge of the logic of narrative inquiry, an acknowledgement of the diversity of narrative approaches, and attention to the implications for judging its quality. We use our story about community-based leadership research to develop and illustrate this argument.

Foldy, E.G. 2005. Claiming a Voice on Race Action Research 3 (1):33-54, March 1,
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Abstract

In this article, I reflect on how my white racial identity shaped and, in turn, was shaped by my dissertation data collection. I identify specific choices and experiences in the research interviews that were influenced by my race, using data both from my own journal as well as feedback about my interviews from two informants of color. I also trace how conducting the interviews and writing about them in my journal affected how I make meaning of my racial identity. I offer these reflections as a contribution to two conversations, both related to exploring and learning about race. First, my discussion of how being white influenced my study contributes to important dialogues about how researcher identities reverberate through the research process. Second, my consideration of the change in my racial identity suggests implications for those interested in learning from and about race. Specifically, it suggests that whites must claim a voice on race in order to contribute meaningfully to cross-racial learning.

Foldy, E.G. 2005. From First-Person Inquiry to Second-Person Dialogue: A Response to the European-American Collaborative Challenging Whiteness Action Research 3 (1): 63-67, March,
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Abstract

The Collaborative raises three areas in which more dialogue would be useful. First, they express a desire for more data about how I was seen by my informants of color. They use that point to raise broader questions about validity: How can I, as a white person, know what is not being said by my informants of color? How can I be sure that my informants were candid with me, given the ‘strong taboos that prohibit revealing oneself . . . to the white world'? Second, they point out that my dissertation research was not emancipatory or mutual: it was a relatively traditional qualitative design, with a clear demarcation between researcher and researched. Finally, they raise the concept of ‘critical humility' and the spirit of inquiry in doing this work. I will address each of these areas in turn.

2004

Foldy, E.G. & Walters, J. 2004. Enabling low-income families to buy their own homes while holding the land in trust for the community
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Abstract

The Burlington Community Land Trust has a radical vision: to secure housing as a basic right, not as a commodity to be bought and sold. The Trust enables low-income families to buy homes on land it owns, controls and keeps perpetually affordable. Founded over 20 years ago, the Trust uses the following approaches: Pursue a Practical Approach: Low-income people receive subsidies from the Trust to buy their homes. The Trust also buys the land on which the home sits, and leases it to the homebuyers. When the homeowners sell, they receive 25% of the increased equity. The Trust gets 75% and uses this to keep the housing permanently affordable. Build a Grassroots Base: The Trust cultivates a membership of 2,400 people. The organization conducts a membership drive and holds neighborhood meetings before taking on a new project in a community. Institutionalize Democratic Leadership: All members have voting rights. The community-based board makes all substantive program decisions. Balance Opposing Opinions: The organization maintains a diverse mix of grassroots and conservative interests on its board as well as among its membership and supporters. The Trust encourages debate. According to one member, disagreement actually serves as a bond: “We have to get it right.”

Foldy, E.G. 2004. Learning from Diversity: A Theoretical Exploration Public Administration Review, Vol. 64 Issue 5 Page 529, September
Abstract

Public-sector organizations tend to be more racially and ethnically diverse than private-sector organizations, leading to the challenge of enhancing heterogeneous work group effectiveness. Recent work suggests that a group's "diversity perspective," or set of beliefs about the role of cultural diversity, moderates diverse group performance. One perspective, the integration and learning perspective, argues that heterogeneous groups function better when they believe that cultural identities can be tapped as sources of new ideas and experiences about work. However, simply holding the integration and learning perspective may not be sufficient. Research on general group learning has shown that it requires particular behaviors and cognitive frames. This article integrates recent work on diversity perspectives with long-standing research on team learning to propose a conceptual model of learning in culturally diverse groups. It suggests that both the integration and learning perspective and more generic learning frames and skills must be present.

2003

Ely, R. J. & Foldy, E.G. 2003. Diversity: Overview Blackwell Publishers, 456 pages.
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Abstract

This reader uses an alternative approach to gender at work to provoke new thinking about traditional management topics, such as leadership and negotiation.Presents students with an alternative conceptual approach to gender in the workplace. Connects gender with other dimensions of difference such as race and class for a deeper understanding of diversity in organizations. Illustrates how traditional images of competence and the ideal worker result in narrow ways of thinking about work, limiting both opportunity and organizational effectiveness. Provokes new ways of thinking about leadership, human resource management, negotiation, globalization and organizational change.

Ely, R., Foldy, E.G. & Scully, M. 2003. Reader in Gender, Work and Organization Blackwell Publishers,
Abstract

This reader uses an alternative approach to gender at work to provoke new thinking about traditional management topics, such as leadership and negotiation. Presents students with an alternative conceptual approach to gender in the workplace. Connects gender with other dimensions of difference such as race and class for a deeper understanding of diversity in organizations. Illustrates how traditional images of competence and the ideal worker result in narrow ways of thinking about work, limiting both opportunity and organizational effectiveness. Provokes new ways of thinking about leadership, human resource management, negotiation, globalization and organizational change.

2002

Foldy, E.G. 2002. 'Managing' Diversity: Power and Identity in Organizations in I. Aaltio-Marjosola & A. Mills (Eds.) Gender, Identities and the Cultures of Organizations. London, Routledge.
Abstract

Gender, Identity and the Culture of Organizations considers how organizations operate as spaces in which minds are gendered and men and women constructed. This edited collection brings together four powerful themes that have developed within the field of organizational analysis over the past two decades: organizational culture; the gendering of organizations; postmodernism and organizational analysis; and critical approaches to management. A range of essays by distinguished writers from countries including the UK, USA, Canada, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, the Netherlands and Sweden, explore innovative methods for the critical theorizing of organizational cultures. In particular, the book reflects the growing interest in the impact of organizational identity formation and its implications for individuals and organizational outcomes in terms of gender. The book also introduces research designs, methods and methodologies by which can be used to explore the complex interrelationships between gender, identity and the culture of organizations.
2001

Foldy, E.G. 2001. Learning from Diversity: A Comparison of Non-Profit and For-Profit Organizations Association for Research on Non-profit Organizations and Voluntary Action. Miami, Fl. November 28-30,
Abstract

Non-profit and for-profit organizations are both engaging with the opportunities and challenges of a demographically diverse workforce. However, their different missions, structures and constituencies can result in varied approaches to addressing difference. This paper, based on broader dissertation research, compares the intentions and experiences of two small organizations, a for-profit and a non-profit, both of which reemphasize inclusion as a guiding principle. However, they manifest these principles in very different ways, with divergent implications for their employees' experiences at work.

Litvin, D. & Foldy, E.G. 2001. Doing 'Diversity Work:' Snapshots from Around the World Academy of Management. Washington, D. C. August 6-8,

Foldy, E.G. 2001. Inside Out and Outside in: Conducting Research on Identity a contribution to the symposium, "Beyond race and gender: Alternative research methods for the study of alternative identities in organizations."Academy of Management, Washington, D. C., August 6-8,

Foldy, E.G., Rudolph, J.R. & Taylor, S.S. 2001. First Person Practice: Using Action Science/Action Inquiry to Improve Ourselves, Our Interactions, and Our Research Professional Development Workshop. Academy of Management. Washington, D. C. August 6-8

2000

Rudolph, J. & Taylor, S., Foldy, E.G. 2000. Collaborative Off-line Reflection: A Way to Develop Skill in Action Science and Action Inquiry Handbook of Action Research. Edited by Reason, P. and H. Bradbury. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications,
Abstract

Handbook of Action Research draws together the different strands of action research, reveals their diverse applications and demonstrates their interrelations. The text articulates an emergent, participatory worldview that will challenge the modernist paradigm and value system.

This far-reaching volume, in illustrating the latest approaches in social inquiry, moves the field forward with innovative insights and participatory practices. It grapples with questions of how to integrate knowledge with action, how to collaborate with co-researchers in the field, and how to present the necessarily "messy" components of such participative research in a coherent fashion. The organization of the volume reflects the many different issues and levels of analysis represented.

 

1999

Foldy, E.G. & Creed, W.E.D. 1999. Action Learning, Fragmentation and the Interaction of Single, Double, and Triple Loop Change: A Case of Gay and Lesbian Workplace Advocacy Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 35 (2).
Abstract

Proposes an elaborated action-learning framework that decomposes action-learning method into the three components of argument, practice, and outcome. Illumination of multiple facets of change; Analysis of the interaction of the three methods in significant change processes; Application of the framework to a case of gay and lesbian workplace advocacy; How the different action-learning methods work together to create change in an organization.

1998

Foldy, E.G. & Nourse, P. 1998. Building Progressive Political Power: A Study of Selected State Political Coalitions Cambridge, MA: Commonwealth Institute.

In the Press

04/07/2014
Race at Work, and On the Court
CUNY Television
03/04/2014
The Color Bind: Talking (and Not Talking) About Race at Work [Excerpt]
Stanford Social Innovation Review