Joe Magee

Joe Magee
Associate Professor of Management

My research revolves around the roles of hierarchy in organizations and society. I have investigated how power differences transform the way people think and behave and how people figure out who has power over whom. My colleagues and I have discovered a series of reliable changes in the psychology of power-holders that seem to be potentially damaging for relationships, organizations, and society but, under certain conditions, actually can contribute to interpersonal and institutional effectiveness. I am also interested in the neuroscience underpinning various kinds of social judgments and the social role of emotion in groups.

At the Wagner School, I teach Managing Public Service Organizations, Power and Influence in Organizations and Politics, and the Capstone Advanced Team Seminar. At the Stern School, I teach Power and Professional Influence to full-time and part-time MBA students.

I have worked on issues of organizational strategy and structure, power and politics, conflict and negotiation, motivation, and organizational culture with various organizations including The United States Conference of Mayors, The National Association of Counties, and the Department of Transportation, Parks and Recreation, and Intergovernmental Affairs in the NYC government.

Semester Course
Fall 2013 CORE-GP.1020.001 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 CORE-GP.1020.001 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 CORE-GP.1020.004 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 CORE-GP.1020.001 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 CORE-GP.1020.004 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 PADM-GP.2178.001 Power and Influence in Organizations and Politics

Organizations are political entities, and politics happen in an organizational context. Power and influence are behind much of what is accomplished in both organizations and politics. Power is the driving force behind social change and the production of public goods; however, many dreams have gone unrealized and political careers have been shattered because of an insufficient understanding of the dynamics of power and influence.

The goal of Power and Influence in Organizations and Politics is to develop your understanding of power and techniques of analyzing influence processes. After you have completed the course, you will be able to identify more effectively the reasons for others’ behavior and influence events toward the ends that you desire. You also will have confronted what power means to you and the role you would like it to play in your career.


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Spring 2010 PHD-GP.5911.001 Doctoral Research Colloquium
The NYU Wagner Doctoral Research Colloquium is a seminar series at which prominent researchers present current work on pressing social issues. The presenters represent a range of disciplines and methodological approaches, and are affiliated with institutions from around the country. This series is open to doctoral students and faculty, and doctoral students must register for one year of the colloqiuium as part of their program requirements.
Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 CORE-GP.1020.001 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 CORE-GP.1020.004 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 PHD-GP.5910.001 Doctoral Research Colloquium

The NYU Wagner Doctoral Research Colloquium is a seminar series at which prominent researchers present current work on pressing social issues. The presenters represent a range of disciplines and methodological approaches, and are affiliated with institutions from around the country. This series is open to doctoral students and faculty, and doctoral students must register for one year of the colloqiuium as part of their program requirements.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 CORE-GP.1020.004 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 CORE-GP.1020.001 Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO)

The goal of Managing Public Service Organizations (MPSO) is to enhance your management and leadership skills. The course provides you with the tools you need to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead high-performing, successful public service organizations.

A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. One must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals. One must make things happen, and often not under ideal conditions or timeframes. The successful execution of these goals requires managers to be able to understand what they bring to and need from their organizations, formulate a mission and strategy, make effective decisions, influence and motivate diverse individuals, apply their own skills and abilities to their teams, optimize the structure and culture of their organization, diagnose problems, and drive organizational change.

MPSO prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 PADM-GP.2178. Power and Influence in Organizations and Politics

Organizations are political entities, and politics happen in an organizational context. Power and influence are behind much of what is accomplished in both organizations and politics. Power is the driving force behind social change and the production of public goods; however, many dreams have gone unrealized and political careers have been shattered because of an insufficient understanding of the dynamics of power and influence.

The goal of Power and Influence in Organizations and Politics is to develop your understanding of power and techniques of analyzing influence processes. After you have completed the course, you will be able to identify more effectively the reasons for others’ behavior and influence events toward the ends that you desire. You also will have confronted what power means to you and the role you would like it to play in your career.


Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2014

West, T. V., Magee, J. C., Gordon, S. H., & Gullett, L. 2014. A little similarity goes a long way: The effects of peripheral but self-revealing similarities on improving and sustaining interracial relationships Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, forthcoming

Magee, J. C., & Frasier, C. 2014. Status and power: The principal inputs to influence for public managers Public Administration Review, forthcoming

Galinsky, A. D., Magee, J. C., Rus, D., Rothman, N. B., & Todd, A. R. 2014. Acceleration with steering: The synergistic benefits of combining power with perspective-taking Social Psychological and Personality Science published online 11 February 2014. DOI: 10.1177/1948550613519685
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Abstract

Power is a psychological accelerator, propelling people toward their goals; however, these goals are often egocentrically focused. Perspective-taking is a psychological steering wheel that helps people navigate their social worlds; however, perspective-taking needs a catalyst to be effective. The current research explores whether combining power with perspective-taking can lead to fairer interpersonal treatment and higher quality decisions by increasing other-oriented information sharing, the propensity to communicate and integrate information that recognizes the knowledge and interests of others. Experiments 1 and 2 found that the combining power with perspective-taking or accountability increased interactional justice, the tendency for decision makers to explain their decisions candidly and respectfully. Experiment 3 involved role-based power embedded in a face-to-face dyadic decision-making task; the combination of power and perspective-taking facilitated the sharing of critical information and led to more accurate dyadic decisions. Combining power and perspective-taking had synergistic effects, producing superior outcomes to what each one achieved separately.

Mason, M. F., Magee, J. C., & Fiske, S. T. 2014. Neural Substrates of Social Status Inference: Roles of Medial Prefrontal Cortex and Superior Temporal Sulcus Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience X:X, pp. 1–10. doi:10.1162/jocn_a_00553
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Abstract

The negotiation of social order is intimately connected to the capacity to infer and track status relationships. Despite the foundational role of status in social cognition, we know little about how the brain constructs status from social interactions that display it. Although emerging cognitive neuroscience reveals that status judgments depend on the intraparietal sulcus, a brain region that supports the comparison of targets along a quantitative continuum, we present evidence that status judgments do not necessarily reduce to ranking targets along a quantitative continuum. The process of judging status also fits a social interdependence analysis. Consistent with third-party perceivers judging status by inferring whose goals are dictating the terms of the interaction and who is subordinating their desires to whom, status judgments were associated with increased recruitment of medial pFC and STS, brain regions implicated in mental state inference.

2013

Galinsky, A. D., Rucker, D. D., & Magee, J. C. 2013. Power: Past findings, present considerations, and future directions In J. Simpson (Assoc. Ed.), M. Mikulincer, & P. Shaver (Eds.), APA handbook of personality and social psychology, Vol. 3: Interpersonal relationships. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Abstract

This chapter offers a comprehensive review of the psychology of power. We examine past waves of social psychological investigations into power, detail the current wave of power research that has exploded in the past decade, and capture emerging themes likely to develop into the next wave of research on power. Our review is structured around a detailed conceptual framework for understanding how power operates within and between people. Specifically, we identify the antecedents of a subjective sense of power (the structural, experiential, semantic, and physical manipulations) and the downstream effects of this sense of power on cognition, self and social perception, interpersonal behavior, motivation, emotion, and physiology. We also highlight critical moderators (e.g., individual differences, culture, status, legitimacy and stability) which influence a) whether an antecedent of power produces a sense of power or b) whether the sense of power produces a particular outcome. Finally, we review theories that account for how power guides and directs behavior and use these theories as a springboard to set an agenda for future research, including identifying factors that harness the positive consequences of power while mitigating its deleterious social effects.

Whitson, JA, KA Liljenquist, AD Galinsky, JC Magee, DH Gruenfeld, & B Cadena. 2013. The blind leading: Power reduces awareness of constraints Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 579-582.
Abstract

Previous research has found that power increases awareness of goal-relevant over goal-irrelevant information. However, this work has failed to distinguish between goal-facilitating and goal-inhibiting information, both of which are goal relevant. The current research investigated whether power increases the cognitive resources devoted to goal-facilitating information or reduces the cognitive resources devoted to goal-constraining information. Two experiments found that, compared to low-power individuals, high-power individuals recalled less goal-constraining information and generated fewer potential constraints that would prevent the protagonist of a story from completing his goal. However, there was no difference between the powerful and powerless in their recall or generation of goal-facilitating information. These results suggest that the powerful are more likely to act on their goals because the constraints that normally inhibit action are less psychologically present for them.

Magee, JC, & PK Smith. 2013. The social distance theory of power. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 17, 158-186.
Abstract

We propose that asymmetric dependence between individuals (i.e., power) produces asymmetric social distance, with high-power individuals feeling more distant than low-power individuals. From this insight, we articulate predictions about how power affects (a) social comparison, (b) susceptibility to influence, (c) mental state inference and responsiveness, and (d) emotions. We then explain how high-power individuals’ greater experienced social distance leads them to engage in more abstract mental representation. This mediating process of construal level generates predictions about how power affects (a) goal selection and pursuit, (b) attention to desirability and feasibility concerns, (c) subjective certainty, (d) value-behavior correspondence, (e) self-control, and (f) person perception. We also reassess the approach/inhibition theory of power (Keltner, Gruenfeld, & Anderson, 2003), noting limitations both in what it can predict and in the evidence directly supporting its proposed mechanisms. Finally, we discuss moderators and methodological recommendations for the study of power from a social distance perspective.

2012

West, TV, ME Heilman, K Gullett, CA Moss-Racusin, & JC Magee. 2012. Building blocks of bias: Gender composition predicts male and female group members’ evaluations of each other and the group 2012. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 48, 1209-1212
Abstract

The present research examined how a group's gender composition influences intragroup evaluations. Group members evaluated fellow group members and the group as a whole following a shared task. As predicted, no performance differences were found as a function of gender composition, but judgments of individuals’ task contributions, the group's effectiveness, and desire to work with one's group again measured at a 10-week follow-up were increasingly negative as the proportion of women in the group increased. Negative judgments were consistently directed at male and female group members as indicated by no gender of target effects, demonstrating that men, simply by working alongside women, can be detrimentally affected by negative stereotypes about women. Implications for gender diversity in the workplace are discussed.

2011

Magee, Joe C., Gavin Kilduff, & Chip Heath. 2011. On the folly of principals' power: Managerial psychology as a cause of bad incentives Research in Organizational Behavior, 31, 25-41
Abstract

Faulty and dysfunctional incentive systems have long interested, and frustrated, managers and organizational scholars alike. In this analysis, we pick up where Kerr (1975) left off and advance an explanation for why bad incentive systems are so prevalent in organizations. We propose that one contributing factor lies in the psychology of people who occupy managerial roles. Although designing effective incentive systems is a challenge wrought with perils for anyone, we believe the psychological consequences and correlates of higher rank within organizations make the challenge more severe for managers. Patterns of promotion and hiring typically yield managers that are more competent than their employees, and ascending to management positions increases individuals' workload and power. In turn, these factors make managers more egocentrically anchored and cognitively abstract, while also reducing their available cognitive capacity for any given task, all of which we argue limits their ability to design effective incentives for employees. Thus, ironically, those with the power to design incentives may be those least able to effectively do so. We discuss four specific types of bad incentive systems that can arise from these psychological tendencies in managers: those that over-emphasize compensation, generate weak motivation, offer perverse motivation, or are misaligned with organizational culture.

2010

Magee, J.C., Milliken, F.J. & Lurie, A.R. 2010. Power Differences in the Construal of a Crisis: The Immediate Aftermath of September 11, 2001 Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 36(3), 354-370.
Abstract

In this research, we examine the relationship between power and three characteristics of construal-abstraction, valence, and certainty-in individuals' verbatim reactions to the events of September 11, 2001 and during the immediate aftermath of the terrorist attacks. We conceptualize power as a form of social distance and find that position power (but not expert power) was positively associated with the use of language that was more abstract (vs. concrete), positive (vs. negative), and certain (vs. uncertain). These effects persist after controlling for temporal distance, geographic distance, and impression management motivation. Our results support central and corollary predictions of Construal Level Theory (Liberman, Trope, & Stephan, 2007; Trope & Liberman, 2003) in a high-consequence, real-world context, and our method provides a template for future research in this area outside of the laboratory.

Ames, Daniel R., Emily C. Bianchi, Joe C. Magee. 2010. Professed impressions: What people say about others affects onlookers' perceptions of speakers' power and warmth Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 152-158
Abstract

During a conversation, it is common for a speaker to describe a third-party that the listener does not know. These professed impressions not only shape the listener's view of the third-party but also affect judgments of the speaker herself. We propose a previously unstudied consequence of professed impressions: judgments of the speaker's power. In two studies, we find that listeners ascribe more power to speakers who profess impressions focusing on a third-party's conscientiousness, compared to those focusing on agreeableness. We also replicate previous research showing that speakers saying positive things about third parties are seen as more agreeable than speakers saying negative things. In the second study, we demonstrate that conscientiousness-power effects are mediated by inferences about speakers' task concerns and positivity-agreeableness effects are mediated by inferences about speakers' other-enhancing concerns. Finally, we show that judgments of speaker status parallel judgments of agreeableness rather than of power, suggesting that perceivers use different processes to make inferences about status and power. These findings have implications for the literatures on person perception, power, and status.

Mason, M. F., J. C. Magee, K. Kuwabara, L. Nind. 2010. Specialization in Relational Reasoning: The Efficiency, Accuracy, and Neural Substrates of Social versus Nonsocial Inferences Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1(4), 318-326
Abstract

Although deduction can be applied both to associations between nonsocial objects and to social relationships among people, the authors hypothesize that social targets elicit specialized cognitive mechanisms that facilitate inferences about social relations. Consistent with this view, in Experiments 1a and 1b the authors show that participants are more efficient and more accurate at inferring social relations compared to nonsocial relations. In Experiment 2 they find direct evidence for a specialized neural apparatus recruited specifically for social relational inferences. When making social inferences, functional magnetic resonance imaging results indicate that the brain regions that play a general role in logical reasoning (e.g., hippocampi,parietal cortices, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex) are supplemented by regions that specialize in representing people's mental states (e.g., posterior superior temporal sulcus, temporo-parietal junction, and medial prefrontal cortex).

2009

Magee, J.C. 2009. Seeing Power in Action: The Roles of Deliberation, Implementation, and Action in Inferences of Power Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 45, 1-14.
Abstract

Six experiments investigate the hypothesis that social targets who display a greater action orientation are perceived as having more power (i.e., more control, less dependence, and more influence) than less action-oriented targets. I find evidence that this inference pattern is based on the pervasive belief that individuals with more power experience less constraint and have a greater capacity to act according to their own volition. Observers infer that targets have more power and influence when they exhibit more implementation than deliberation in the process of making decisions in their personal lives (Study 1a), in a public policy context (Study 1b), and in small groups (Study 2). In an organizational context, observers infer that a target who votes for a policy to change from the status quo has more power than a target who votes not to change from the status quo (Study 3). People also infer greater intra-organizational power and higher hierarchical rank in targets who take physical action toward a personal goal than in those who do not (Studies 4–5).

2008

Gruenfeld, D. H, Inesi, M. E., Magee, J.C. & Galinsky, A.D. 2008. Power and the objectification of social targets Power and the objectification of social targets. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2008, Vol. 95, No. 1, 111-127
Abstract

Objectification has been defined historically as a process of subjugation whereby people, like objects, are treated as means to an end. The authors hypothesized that objectification is a response to social power that involves approaching useful social targets regardless of the value of their other human qualities. Six studies found that under conditions of power, approach toward a social target was driven more by the target's usefulness, defined in terms of the perceiver's goals, than in low-power and baseline conditions. This instrumental response to power, which was linked to the presence of an active goal, was observed using multiple instantiations of power, different measures of approach, a variety of goals, and several types of instrumental and noninstrumental target attributes. Implications for research on the psychology of power, automatic goal pursuit, and self-objectification theory are discussed.

Magee, J.C. & Langner, C.A. 2008. How Personalized and Socialized Power Motivation Facilitate Antisocial and Prosocial Decision-Making Journal of Research in Personality, 42, 1547-1559
Abstract

In two studies, we investigate the effects of individuals’ power motivation on decision-making. We distinguish between two types of power motivation [McClelland, D. C. (1970). The two faces of power. Journal of International Affairs, 24, 29–47; Winter, D. G. (1973). The power motive. New York: The Free Press] and demonstrate that both types of power motivation facilitate influential decision-making but that each type plays a different role in different contexts. In a conflict context (Study 1), individuals’ personalized (self-serving) power motivation was associated with antisocial decisions, and in a healthcare context (Study 2), individuals socialized (other-serving) power motivation was associated with prosocial decisions. Furthermore, the type of power motivation elicited in each context was associated with less perceived need to deliberate over the relevant policy decision. In separating out the independent effects of each type of power motivation, we are able to explain more variance in decision-making behavior across various contexts than in models using aggregate power motivation (personalized plus socialized).

Magee, J.C. & Langner, C.A. 2008. How personalized and socialized power motivation facilitate antisocial and prosocial decision-making Journal of Research in Personality 42 1547-1559
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Abstract

In two studies, we investigate the effects of individuals' power motivation on decisionmaking. We distinguish between two types of power motivation [McClelland, D. C. (1970). The two faces of power. Journal of International Affairs, 24, 29-47; Winter, D. G. (1973). The power motive. New York: The Free Press] and demonstrate that both types of power motivation facilitate influential decision-making but that each type plays a different role in different contexts. In a conflict context (Study 1), individuals' personalized (selfserving) power motivation was associated with antisocial decisions, and in a healthcare context (Study 2), individuals socialized (other-serving) power motivation was associated with prosocial decisions. Furthermore, the type of power motivation elicited in each context was associated with less perceived need to deliberate over the relevant policy decision. In separating out the independent effects of each type of power motivation, we are able to explain more variance in decision-making behavior across various contexts than in models using aggregate power motivation (personalized plus socialized).

Galinsky, A.D., Magee, J.C., Gruenfeld, D.H., Whitson, J. & Liljenquist, K. 2008. Power Reduces the Press of the Situation: Implications for Creativity, Conformity, and Dissonance Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 1450-1466/
Abstract

Although power is often conceptualized as the capacity to influence others, the current research explores whether power psychologically protects people from influence. In contrast to classic social psychological research demonstrating the strength of the situation in directing attitudes, expressions, and intentions, five experiments (using experiential primes, semantic primes, and role manipulations of power) demonstrate that the powerful (a) generate creative ideas that are less influenced by salient examples, (b) express attitudes that conform less to the expressed opinions of others, (c) are more influenced by their own social value orientation relative to the reputation of a negotiating partner, and (d) perceive greater choice in making counterattitudinal statements. This last experiment illustrates that power is not always psychologically liberating; it can create internal conflict, arousing dissonance, and thereby lead to attitude change. Across the experiments, high-power participants were immune to the typical press of situations, with intrapsychic processes having greater sway than situational or interpersonal ones on their creative and attitudinal expressions.

Galinsky, A.D. Magee, J.C., Gruenfeld, D.H., Whitson, J. & Liljenquist, K. 2008. Power Reduces the Press of the Situation: Implications for Creativity, Conformity, and Dissonance Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 95, No. 6, 1450-1466
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Abstract

Although power is often conceptualized as the capacity to influence others, the current research explores whether power psychologically protects people from influence. In contrast to classic social psychological research demonstrating the strength of the situation in directing attitudes, expressions, and intentions, 5 experiments (using experiential primes, semantic primes, and role manipulations of power) demonstrate that the powerful (a) generate creative ideas that are less influenced by salient examples, (b) express attitudes that conform less to the expressed opinions of others, (c) are more influenced by their own social value orientation relative to the reputation of a negotiating opponent, and (d) perceive greater choice in making counterattitudinal statements. This last experiment illustrates that power is not always psychologically liberating; it can create internal conflict, arousing dissonance, and thereby lead to attitude change. Across the experiments, high-power participants were immune to the typical press of situations, with intrapsychic processes having greater sway than situational or interpersonal ones on their creative and attitudinal expressions.

Magee, J.C. & Galinsky, A. 2008. Social Hierarchy: The Self-Reinforcing Nature of Power and Status Academy of Management Annals, Vol. 2. Edited by J. P. Walsh & A. P. Brief.  London, UK: Taylor & Francis,
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Abstract

Hierarchy is such a defining and pervasive feature of organizations that its forms and basic functions are often taken for granted in organizational research. In this review, we revisit some basic psychological and sociological elements of hierarchy and argue that status and power are two important yet distinct bases of hierarchical differentiation. We first define power and status and distinguish our definitions from previous conceptualizations. We then integrate a number of different literatures to explain why status and power hierarchies tend to be self-reinforcing. Power, related to one's control over valued resources, transforms individual psychology such that the powerful think and act in ways that lead to the retention and acquisition of power. Status, related to the respect one has in the eyes of others, generates expectations for behavior and opportunities for advancement that favor those with a prior status advantage. We also explore the role that hierarchy-enhancing belief systems play in stabilizing hierarchy, both from the bottom up and from the top down. Finally, we address a number of factors that we think are instrumental in explaining the conditions under which hierarchies change. Our framework suggests a number of avenues for future research on the bases, causes, and consequences of hierarchy in groups and organizations.

2007

Magee, J.C., Galinsky, A. & Gruenfeld, D. 2007. Power, Propensity to Negotiate, and Moving First in Competitive Interactions Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.
Abstract

Five experiments investigated how the possession and experience of power affects the initiation of competitive interaction. In Experiments 1a and 1b, high-power individuals displayed a greater propensity to initiate a negotiation than did low-power individuals. Three additional experiments showed that power increased the likelihood of making the first move in a variety of competitive interactions. In Experiment 2, participants who were semantically primed with power were nearly 4 times as likely as participants in a control condition to choose to make the opening arguments in a debate competition scenario. In Experiment 3, negotiators with strong alternatives to a negotiation were more than 3 times as likely to spontaneously express an intention to make the first offer compared to participants who lacked any alternatives. Experiment 4 showed that high-power negotiators were more likely than low-power negotiators to actually make the first offer and that making the first offer produced a bargaining advantage.
2006

Magee, J.C. & Tiedens L. Z. 2006. Emotional ties that bind: The roles of valence and consistency of group emotion in inferences of cohesiveness and common fate Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Abstract

In three studies, observers based inferences about the cohesiveness and common fate of groups on the emotions expressed by group members. The valence of expressions affected cohesiveness inferences, whereas the consistency of expressions affected inferences of whether members have common fate. These emotion composition effects were stronger than those due to the race or sex composition of the group. Furthermore, the authors show that emotion valence and consistency are differentially involved in judgments about the degree to which the group as a whole was responsible for group performance. Finally, it is demonstrated that valence-cohesiveness effects are mediated by inferences of interpersonal liking and that consistency-common fate effects are mediated by inferences of psychological similarity. These findings have implications for the literature on entitativity and regarding the function of emotions in social contexts.

Zhong, C., Magee, J., Maddux, W. & Galinsky, A.. 2006. Power, Culture, and Action: Considerations in the Expression and Enactment of Power in East Asian and Western Societies Research on Managing Groups and Teams edited by E Mannix, M Neale, and Y Chen. JAI Press.
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Abstract

We present a model of how culture affects both the conceptualizations and behavioral consequences of power, focusing in particular on how culture moderates the previously demonstrated positive relationship between power and assertive action. Western cultures tend to be characterized by independence, whereas individuals in East Asian cultures tend to think of themselves as interdependent. As a result power is conceptualized around influence and entitlement in the West and Westerners behave assertively to satisfy oneself. In contrast, East Asians conceptualize power around responsibility and tend to consider how their behavior affects others. As a result the experience of power activates a tendency toward restraint. Therefore, power is associated with an increase in assertive action in independent cultures, whereas it leads to restraint of action in interdependent cultures. We discuss a number of moderators of this effect including the type of actions and the groups who are affected by those actions.

Galinsky, A.D. 2006. Power Plays Negotiation, Jul 2006, p1-4, 4p.
Abstract

The article presents information on the role of power in negotiation. Power could generate competition or conflict in negotiations, however, effective channelization of power helps in bringing the win-win situation to both the parties. Social psychologists have described power as lack of dependence on others. Individuals possessing power tend to have the approach related to the behavior that includes positive mood or searching for rewards in their environment. On the other hand, powerless individuals show a great deal of self-inhibition and fear towards potential threats. INSETS: WOMEN: INCREASE YOUR POWER AT THE TABLE;POWER ACROSS CULTURES.

Galinksy A.D., Magee, J.C., Inesi, M.E. & Gruenfeld, D.H. 2006. Power and Perspectives Not Taken Psychological Science, Dec 2006, Vol. 17 Issue 12, p1068-1074, 7p, 1 bw
Abstract

Four experiments and a correlational study explored the relationship between power and perspective taking. In Experiment 1, participants primed with high power were more likely than those primed with low power to draw an E on their forehead in a self-oriented direction, demonstrating less of an inclination to spontaneously adopt another person's visual perspective. In Experiments 2a and 2b, high-power participants were less likely than low-power participants to take into account that other people did not possess their privileged knowledge, a result suggesting that power leads individuals to anchor too heavily on their own vantage point, insufficiently adjusting to others' perspectives. In Experiment 3, high-power participants were less accurate than control participants in determining other people's emotion expressions; these results suggest a power-induced impediment to experiencing empathy. An additional study found a negative relationship between individual difference measures of power and perspective taking. Across these studies, power was associated with a reduced tendency to comprehend how other people see, think, and feel.

2004

Magee, J.C., Gruenfeld, D.H., Keltner, D. & Galinsky, A. 2004. Leadership and the Psychology of Power In D. M. Messick & R. Kramer (Eds.),The Psychology of Leadership: New Perspectives and Research. Lawrence Erlbaum,
Abstract

This chapter begins to fill in a gap in the leadership literature by looking at the psychological experience of leaders. We assume most leaders possess power over those whom they lead, and we explicate a theory of how power affects cognition and behavior. First, power-holders' attention is focused on non-conscious and conscious goal-relevant information. Thus, power-holders interpret social information in relation to their goals. They are less likely to process social norms and standards of behavior that could impede progress toward goals, and they are more likely to see others in relation to their goals. Second, as judgments of the self by others are less consequential, power-holders experience a decrease in public self-awareness, or self-consciousness. Third, power-holders' self-regulatory mechanisms, which require effortful control, break down for reasons of motivation and cognitive busyness. Power-holders are less motivated to control their behavior because they care less about others' judgments, but they also are less able to control their behavior because their cognitive resources tend to be more occupied. These three factors -- increased goal focus, decreased self-consciousness, and decreased self-regulation - converge to increase the likelihood of automatic behavior that represents power holders' "dominant" situational responses.
2003

Galinsky, A.D., Gruenfeld, D.H. & Magee, J.C. 2003. From Power to Action Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 85, No. 3, pp. 453-466.
Abstract

In the present research, the authors examined the effect of a message recipient's power on attitude change and introduced a new mechanism by which power can affect social judgment. In line with prior research that suggested a link between power and approach tendencies, the authors hypothesized that having power increases confidence relative to being powerless. After demonstrating this link in Experiment 1, in 4 additional studies, they examined the role of power in persuasion as a function of when power is infused into the persuasion process. On the basis of the idea that power validates whatever mental content is accessible, they hypothesized that power would have different effects on persuasion depending on when power was induced. Specifically, the authors predicted that making people feel powerful prior to a message would validate their existing views and thus reduce the perceived need to attend to subsequent information. However, it was hypothesized that inducing power after a message has been processed would validate one's recently generated thoughts and thus influence the extent to which people rely upon their thoughts in determining their attitudes.