Mitchell L. Moss

Mitchell L. Moss
Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy & Planning

Mitchell L. Moss, Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy and Planning, and Director of the Rudin Center for Transportation, has been described as a “New Yorkologist” by The New York Times.  

Professor Moss has been on the faculty of New York University since 1973. He served as an adviser to Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg during his first campaign for Mayor in 2001. From 1988 to 2003 he was Director of NYU’s Taub Urban Research Center and from 1983 to 2004 he was deputy to the Chairman of the Governor’s Council on Fiscal and Economic Priorities.

Professor Moss has directed research projects for the National Science Foundation, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and has been a consultant to leading corporations and government agencies. He has testified before the United States House of Representatives’ Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and has been an expert witness in litigation before the United States District Court, Southern District of New York. His essays have appeared in The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle, The New York Post, The New York Observer and Politico.com, as well as in leading scholarly journals.

Semester Course
Spring 2013 PADM-GP.2414.001 Public Policy for Metropolitan Regions

This course will explore how public policies, economic trends and technological change influence the development of metropolitan regions. Key topics include immigration and demographic patterns, the spatial impact of information and telecommunications technologies, metropolitan planning and regional governments; cultural innovation and creative cities, biotechnology and economic development, air transportation and high speed rail, policies for the growth of cities and large urban regions.


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Fall 2012 URPL-GP.2415.001 Public Policy and Planning in New York

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of New York City's governments and politics. We will examine the changing role of the mayor and other elected officials, organization of the municipal government, and the way in which state and regional governments affect public services and city policies. The course will explore the way in which political and economic forces affect public policies with an emphasis on land use planning and physical development, mayoral control of public schools, economic development, the redevelopment of lower Manhattan, congestion pricing, and waterfront development.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 PADM-GP.2414.001 Public Policy for Metropolitan Regions

This course will explore how public policies, economic trends and technological change influence the development of metropolitan regions. Key topics include immigration and demographic patterns, the spatial impact of information and telecommunications technologies, metropolitan planning and regional governments; cultural innovation and creative cities, biotechnology and economic development, air transportation and high speed rail, policies for the growth of cities and large urban regions.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 URPL-GP.2415.001 Public Policy and Planning in New York

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of New York City's governments and politics. We will examine the changing role of the mayor and other elected officials, organization of the municipal government, and the way in which state and regional governments affect public services and city policies. The course will explore the way in which political and economic forces affect public policies with an emphasis on land use planning and physical development, mayoral control of public schools, economic development, the redevelopment of lower Manhattan, congestion pricing, and waterfront development.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 PADM-GP.2414.001 Public Policy for Metropolitan Regions

This course will explore how public policies, economic trends and technological change influence the development of metropolitan regions. Key topics include immigration and demographic patterns, the spatial impact of information and telecommunications technologies, metropolitan planning and regional governments; cultural innovation and creative cities, biotechnology and economic development, air transportation and high speed rail, policies for the growth of cities and large urban regions.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 URPL-GP.2415.001 Public Policy and Planning in New York

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of New York City's governments and politics. We will examine the changing role of the mayor and other elected officials, organization of the municipal government, and the way in which state and regional governments affect public services and city policies. The course will explore the way in which political and economic forces affect public policies with an emphasis on land use planning and physical development, mayoral control of public schools, economic development, the redevelopment of lower Manhattan, congestion pricing, and waterfront development.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 PADM-GP.2414.001 Public Policy for Metropolitan Regions

This course will explore how public policies, economic trends and technological change influence the development of metropolitan regions. Key topics include immigration and demographic patterns, the spatial impact of information and telecommunications technologies, metropolitan planning and regional governments; cultural innovation and creative cities, biotechnology and economic development, air transportation and high speed rail, policies for the growth of cities and large urban regions.


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Spring 2010 UPADM-GP.0215.001 The Politics of New York

This course will provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the political and governmental processes that influence New York City. The course will explore the structure of the municipal government, the role of the mayor and city council, the way in which state and regional agencies affect public services, and the role of the media in the political life of New York City.


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Fall 2009 URPL-GP.2415.001 Public Policy and Planning in New York

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of New York City's governments and politics. We will examine the changing role of the mayor and other elected officials, organization of the municipal government, and the way in which state and regional governments affect public services and city policies. The course will explore the way in which political and economic forces affect public policies with an emphasis on land use planning and physical development, mayoral control of public schools, economic development, the redevelopment of lower Manhattan, congestion pricing, and waterfront development.


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Spring 2009 URPL-GP.2628.001 Technology, Media, and the Cities

This course will explore four key topics: 1) the relationship of information technology to the growth and development of cities;2) the use of information technologies in the provision of public services;3) the impact of the internet and social networking on the media and involvement in public affairs and 4) critical telecommunications policy issues.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 URPL-GP.2415.001 Public Policy and Planning in New York

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of New York City's governments and politics. We will examine the changing role of the mayor and other elected officials, organization of the municipal government, and the way in which state and regional governments affect public services and city policies. The course will explore the way in which political and economic forces affect public policies with an emphasis on land use planning and physical development, mayoral control of public schools, economic development, the redevelopment of lower Manhattan, congestion pricing, and waterfront development.


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  Projects
Adaptable Transportation Models for the New York Region
Description
Funding for two proposed symposia involving regional transportation executives and technology leaders to discuss near and emerging technological advances to be used in transportation over the next two decades.
Preparing Emerging Leaders in Transportation Innovation
Description
Proposal to improve mobility and increase the region's competitive position with its global counterports by infusing local transportation organizations and leaders with new ideas and information that will foster innovative approaches to the New York Region's aging transporation infrastructure through 3 full-day workshops featuring transportation executives, technology experts and management professionals.
Improving Employment Opportunities with Better Transportation Access
Date Publication/Paper
2014

Moss, Mitchell L. and Hugh O'Neill. 2014. A Port Authority That Works Rudin Center for Transportation, NYU Wagner School, April 2014.
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Abstract

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has been a vital force in the physical and economic growth of the New York-New Jersey region. During the past few years, however, public attention has focused on the Port Authority’s spending, management, and political interference in the agency’s operations. In recent weeks, several sources have called for reform, restructuring, or even abolition of the Port Authority.

However, the critical problem facing the Port Authority today is not mismanagement, political abuse, or rivalry between New York and New Jersey. The fundamental challenge is that the business model under which the Authority has operated for the past thirty years is no longer sustainable. For the New York-New Jersey region to grow over the next fifty years, the Port Authority must rethink not only how it manages its business, but also how it defines what that business is.

2012

Moss, Mitchell L. and Hugh O'Neil 2012. Urban Mobility in the 21st Century The Furman Center for Transportationan and
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Abstract

Between 2010 and 2050, the number of people living in the world’s urban areas is expected to grow by 80 percent – from 3.5 billion to 6.3 billion. This growth will pose great challenges for urban mobility – for the networks of transportation facilities and services that maintain the flow of people and commerce into, out of and within the world’s cities.

Addressing the challenge of urban mobility is essential – for maintaining cities’ historic role as the world’s principal sources of innovation and economic growth, for improving the quality of life in urban areas and for mitigating the impact of climate change. It will require creative applications of new technologies, changes in the way transportation services are organized and delivered, and innovations in urban planning and design.

This report examines several aspects of the challenge of urban mobility in the twenty-first century – the growth of the world’s urban population, and changes in the characteristics of that population; emerging patterns of urban mobility; and changes in technology design and connectivity.

 

 

Moss, Mitchell L. and Carson Y. Qing. 2012. The Emergence of the Super-Commuter: Update with 2010 Data Rudin Center for Transportation, New York University Wagner School of Public Service, August 2012
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Abstract

This update to the “Emergence of the Super-Commuter” report released in February 2012 uses recently released 2010 home-to-work flows data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Longitudinal Employer Household Dynamics OnTheMap tool to examine whether the super-commuting trend has continued to grow between 2009 and 2010, by analyzing 1-year and 8-year growth rates in where workers live. The report finds that while super-commuting growth rates have slowed between 2009 and 2010, the slowdown was primarily due to job market conditions, and super-commuting trends continue to outpace job growth trends in 9 out of the 10 counties profiled in this study. The report also distinguishes between two types of super-commuters: those who live along the combined metropolitan area’s periphery and those who travel less frequently and longer distances to each urban core county. It finds that for most cities, both types of super-commuters have been growing rapidly over the last decade, but these trends vary across cities.

Moss, Mitchell L., Carson Y. Qing, and Sarah Kaufman. 2012. Commuting to Manhattan, A study of residence location trends for Manhattan workers from 2002 to 2009 March 2012
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Abstract

Manhattan, a global center of  finance, culture, fashion and media, harnesses a workforce of 2 million people. Regionally, Manhattan is the business hub for the New York metropolitan area, with commuters entering the city every morning from the other four boroughs,  suburban counties in New Jersey, the Hudson Valley, western Connecticut, and Long Island, and distant locations, such as eastern Pennsylvania. The workforce of Manhattan is both growing and changing. There is a growing set of high-income, service-related occupations, and an increasing number of workers are residing in the outer boroughs or to the west, across the Hudson River in New Jersey. In fact, Manhattan now has 59,000 “super-commuters” who do not live within the metropolitan region. This report examines key trends in the residential location of Manhattan workers and will also discuss the travel, occupation, and income characteristics of Manhattan workers living in the surrounding metropolitan region. Finally, we explore the strength, resilience and vitality of Manhattan as a global economic and cultural hub in the 21st century.

Moss, Mitchell L. and Carson Qing. 2012. The Dynamic Population of Manhattan Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, Wagner School of Public Service, New York University, March, 2012.
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Abstract

We cannot understand Manhattan in the 21st century by relying on conventional measures of urban activity. Simply put, Manhattan consists of much more than its residential population and daily workforce. This island, measuring just 22.96 square miles, serves approximately 4 million people on a typical weekday, 2.9 million on a weekend day, and a weekday night population of 2.05 million. Manhattan, with a residential population of 1.6 million more than doubles its daytime population as a result of the complex network of tunnels, bridges, railroad lines, subways, commuter rail, ferry systems, bicycle lanes, and pedestrian walkways that link Manhattan to the surrounding counties, cities and towns.

This transportation infrastructure, largely built during the twentieth century, is operated by the City of New York, Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and Port Authority of New York & New Jersey. The infrastructure network generates a constant flow of people who are responsible for Manhattan's emergence as a world capital for finance, media, fashion, and the arts.

The residential population count does not include the 1.6 million commuters who enter Manhattan every weekday, or the hundreds of thousands of visitors who use Manhattan's tourist attractions, hospitals, universities, and nightclubs. This report analyzes the volume of people flowing in and out of Manhattan during a 24-hour period; we provide an upper estimate of the actual number of people in Manhattan during a typical work day.

 

Moss, Mitchell L. and Carson Qing. 2012. The Emergence of the "Super-Commuter" Rudin Center for Rudin Center for Transportation, New York University Wagner School of Public Service, February, 2012
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Abstract

The twenty-first century is emerging as the century of the "super-commuter," a person who works in the central county of a given metropolitan area, but lives beyond the boundaries of that metropolitan area, commuting long distance by air, rail, car, bus, or a combination of modes. The super-commuter typically travels once or twice weekly for work, and is a rapidly growing part of our workforce. The changing structure of the workplace, advances in telecommunications, and the global pattern of economic life have made the super-commuter a new force in transportation.

Many workers are not required to appear in one office five days a week; they conduct work from home, remote locations, and even while driving or flying. The international growth of broadband internet access, the development of home-based computer systems that rival those of the workplace, and the rise of mobile communications systems have contributed to the emergence of the super-commuter in the United States. Super-commuters are well-positioned to take advantage of higher salaries in one region and lower housing costs in another.

Many workers are not expected to physically appear in a single office at all: the global economy has made it possible for highly-skilled workers to be employed on a strictly virtual basis, acquiring clients anywhere and communicating via email, phone and video conference. Furthermore, the global economy has rendered the clock irrelevant, making it possible for people to work, virtually, in a different time zone than the one in which they live. Simply put, the workplace is no longer fixed in one location, but rather where the worker is situated. As a result, city labor sheds (where workers live) have expanded over the past decade to encompass not just a city's exurbs, but also distant, non-local metropolitan regions, resulting in greater economic integration between cities situated hundreds of miles apart.

NYU's Rudin Center has found that super-commuting is a growing trend in major United States regions, with growth in eight of the ten largest metropolitan areas.

 

2011

Moss, Mitchell 2011. How New York City Won the Olympics Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management. New York University. November 2011
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Abstract

This report demonstrates that New York City has successfully achieved almost all of the key elements in the NYC2012 Olympic Plan, despite the fact that it was not chosen to host the 2012 Games. For New York City, planning for the 2012 Olympics provided the framework to shape the future of the city, through new mass transit, rezoning, and investment in parks, recreational facilities, and housing throughout the city. Long neglected and underused industrial areas have been transformed as a result of the NYC2012 Plan, including the far west side of Manhattan, which will soon be linked to the rest of the city through an extension of the #7 subway line. This report describes how many projects, long the subject of public discussion and civic debate, were able to be carried out as a result of the NYC2012 Olympic Plan.

Moss, Mitchell, Josh Mandell and Carson Qing. 2011. Mobile Communications and Transportation in Metropolitan Regions The Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management. New York University. July 2011.
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Abstract

This study examines the role of mobile communications in urban transportation systems and analyzes American metropolitan regions best positioned to capitalize on the growth of mobile technologies. This paper identifies three critical factors—data accessibility, mobile network strength, and mobile tech user/developer demographics—and uses data from several public resources in an analysis of major Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs). The authors explore trends and public policy implications for furthering the use of mobile communications in the transportation systems of metropolitan regions.

The rankings revealed that metropolitan regions each have areas of strength and weakness. In fact, no MSA ranked in the top five for each category, suggesting that though several cities were very strong (top five) in two categories (San Jose, San Francisco, Washington DC, San Diego), every MSA has substantial room for improvement.

2009

Moss, M., Schellhamer, C. & David A Berman. 2009. The Stafford Act and Priorities for Reform Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Berkeley Electronic Press, Vol. 6, issue 1: Article 13 
Abstract

During the past fifty years, federal disaster policy in the United States has been shaped by an ongoing conflict between proponents who favor federal intervention following a disaster and those who believe disaster response should be the responsibility of state and local governments and charity. This article explores the existing federal disaster policy landscape within the United States with a focus on the Stafford Act, the cultural and political forces that produced it, and how the current system is ill equipped to aid in the response and recovery from major catastrophes. The Stafford Act defines how federal disasters are declared, determines the types of assistance to be provided by the federal government, and establishes cost sharing arrangements among federal, state, and local governments. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) carries out the provisions of the Stafford Act and distributes much of the assistance provided by the Act. With the establishment of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the threat of domestic terrorism, and large-scale natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina, the limits of the Stafford Act and FEMA have been shown. We look at several areas where the shortcomings of the Stafford Act have emerged and propose directions for reform.

2006

Moss, M. 2006. Gasoline Prices, Interest Rates, and the 2008 Election The New York Observer June
Abstract

Forget immigration, global warning, Donald Rumsfeld and abortion rights.

The hot issues of today will quickly fade away if the current surge in gasoline prices and home-mortgage rates continues unabated. And all indications are that both the price of gas and the cost of borrowing are moving in one direction only: north.

 

Moss, M. & Townsend, A. 2006. Disaster Forensics: Leveraging Crisis Information Systems for Social Science Proceedings of the Third International ISCRAM Conference edited by R Van De Walle and M Turroff. Newark Institute of Technology, May
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Abstract

This paper contributes to the literature on information systems in crisis management by providing an overview of
emerging technologies for sensing and recording sociological data about disasters. These technologies are transforming our capacity to gather data about what happens during disasters, and our ability to reconstruct the social dynamics of affected communities. Our approach takes a broad review of disaster research literature, current research efforts and new reports from recent disasters, especially Hurricane Katrina and the Indian Ocean Tsunami. We forecast that sensor networks will revolutionize conceptual and empirical approaches to research in the social sciences, by providing unprecedented volumes of high-quality data on movements, communication and response activities by both formal and informal actors. We conclude with a set of recommendations to designers of crisis management information systems to design systems that can support social science research, and argue for the inclusion of post-disaster social research as a design consideration in such systems.

Moss, M. L. 2006. New York City: IN THE 21st CENTURY Economic Development Journal, Spring 2006, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p7-16, 10p.
Abstract

The article reflects on the role of New York City in the 21st century which includes bringing people together with other people to generate the information and products that are then sold around the world. It also presents a brief history of the city in becoming a leading city in the global economy. It also discusses the economic and technological innovations the city had undertaken to become a leading city and the reforms it is planning to implement to maintain its status.

Moss, M., Kaufman, S. & Townsend, A. 2006. The Relationship of Sustainability to Telecommunications Technology and Society, Vol. 28, pp 235-244
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Abstract

Although telecommunications networks are central to modern urban life, scholars and policymakers have largely ignored the relationship of sustainability to telecommunications. Telecommunications can affect sustainability as a result of the complex, indirect effects that changes in telecommunications systems have on mobility, land use, locational decisions and energy consumption. During the past quarter-century, the construction of new telecommunications networks for communications across national borders, within metropolitan neighborhoods, and inside buildings, has transformed the way in which we use information. This article explores ways in which telecommunications has allowed for great strides towards a more sustainable urban ecology by making buildings more efficient, shifting reliance from roads to fibers and transforming government, economic development, transportation and disaster preparedness.

Moss, M. 2006. The Stafford Act: An Agenda for Reform Center for Catastrophe Preparedness and Response, New York University,
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Abstract

The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (the Stafford Act) is the principal legislation governing the federal response to disasters within the United States. The act spells out - among other things - how disasters are declared, the types of assistance to be provided, and the cost sharing arrangements between federal, state, and local governments. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is the primary federal agency responsible for responding to disasters within the United States, carrying out the provisions of the Stafford Act, and distributing assistance provided by the act. The Stafford Act establishes two incident levels - emergencies and major disasters. Emergencies tend to be smaller events where a limited federal role will suffice. Major disasters are larger events - but this can run the gamut from a blizzard in Buffalo to a major earthquake in southern California that affects millions. In other words, no distinction, and no special response, is provided in the Stafford Act following catastrophes such as major earthquakes and hurricanes. The Stafford Act should be amended to establish a response level for catastrophic events. The Stafford Act does not adequately recognize 21st century threats. For example, the definition of a major disaster does not cover chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear attacks or accidents. The act should further be amended to encompass 21st century threats.
This report does not focus on the performance of government agencies immediately following a disaster- these have been well documented by others. Rather, this report focuses on the federal role in the long-term recovery and rebuilding process following catastrophes, and what can be done to improve the effectiveness of the federal government in aiding these efforts.

2005

Moss, M. 2005. Congestion Pricing New York Daily News December

Moss, M. 2005. The Redevelopment of Lower Manhattan: The Role of the City The Contentious City: The Politics of Recovery in New York City edited by John Mollenkopf. Sage Foundation,
Abstract

The attack on the World Trade Center reinforced a process of change in lower Manhattan that had been under way for at least the past fifty years. The public and private responses to the destruction wrought on September 11 have provided the funds, organizational capacity, and public commitment to do what a previous generation of municipal planners tried to accomplish, with only partial success: creating a mixed residential and office community in what was once New York City's dominant financial and business district. Federal aid to rebuild lower Manhattan has been the catalyst for modernizing and expanding its mass transit systems and facilities, providing low-cost financing for converting obsolete office buildings into housing, improving pedestrian movement, investing public funds in parks and cultural institutions, and subsidizing the creation of new public schools. This chapter examines the key public and private organizations that have shaped this redevelopment and the implications for the future of lower Manhattan and for office development in the rest of New York City.

2004

Zimmerman, R. & Horan, T.A. 2004. Digital Infrastructures: Enabling Civil and Environmental Systems through Information Technology Zimmerman, R. and T.A. Horan, eds. Digital Infrastructures: Enabling Civil and Environmental Systems through Information Technology. London, UK: Routledge,
Abstract

An invisible network of digital technology systems underlies the highly visible networks of roads, waterways, satellites, and power-lines. Increasingly, these systems are becoming the "infrastructure's infrastructure," providing a crucial array of data on network demand, performance, reliability, and security. "Digital Infrastructures" presents an interdisciplinary analysis of the technological systems that envelop these networks. The book balances analyses of specific civil and environmental infrastructures with broader policy and management issues, including the challenges of using IT to manage these critical systems under crises conditions. "Digital Infrastructures" addresses not only the technological dimension but, importantly, how social, organizational and environmental forces affect how IT can be used to manage water, power, transport and telecommunication systems. The book is organized four sections. First, fundamental themes of policy, management, and technology are presented to frame the domain of digital infrastructures. Second, the way in which information technologies are applied in specific infrastructure sectors provides an in-depth assessment of what the advantages and disadvantages have been over time. Third, cross-cutting themes of economics, earth systems engineering, and international sustainability show how various systems perspectives approach some of the barriers to integrating information technology and infrastructure. Finally, the concluding section looks at some of the new directions and challenges being posed by issues such as security. "Digital Infrastructures" is the first integrated treatment of how IT technology is fundamentally affecting how critical infrastructures are managed. It is geared to provide the new infrastructure professional with state of the art concepts, methods, and examples for use in creating public policies, strategic plans, and new systems. It will be an essential book for upper level undergraduate and graduate courses in infrastructure management, critical infrastructure, environmental systems management, and management of IT systems.

Moss, M. & Townsend, A. 2004. How Telecommunications is Shaping Urban Spaces J. Wheeler et. al., eds. Fractionated Geographies: Cities in the Telecommunications Age
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Abstract

All too often, telecommunications systems are treated as an alternative to transportation systems, as a substitute for the physical movement of people and services. The growing use of telecommunications systems is doing far more than influence where people work and live, but is actually changing the character of activities that occur in the home, workplace, and automobile. This chapter examines the way in which information and telecommunications are transforming everyday urban life; making the home into an extension of the office, shopping mall, and classroom; allowing the automobile and airplane to become workplaces; and converting the office building into a hub for social interaction and interpersonal contact. The diffusion of information technologies drastically increases the complexity of cities by increasing the number and type of interactions among individuals, firms, technical systems and the external environment. Information systems are permitting new combinations of people, equipment, and places; as a result, there is a dramatic change in the spatial organization of activities within cities and large metropolitan regions.

Moss, M. & Townsend, A. 2004. Telecommunications: Catastrophe and Recovery in the Information City in Digital Infrastructures: Enabling Civil and Environmental Systems through Information Technology. London, UK: Routledge,
Abstract

An invisible network of digital technology systems underlies the highly visible networks of roads, waterways, satellites, and power-lines. Increasingly, these systems are becoming the "infrastructure's infrastructure," providing a crucial array of data on network demand, performance, reliability, and security. Digital Infrastructures presents an interdisciplinary analysis of the technological systems that envelop these networks. The book balances analyses of specific civil and environmental infrastructures with broader policy and management issues, including the challenges of using IT to manage these critical systems under crises conditions.

Digital Infrastructures addresses not only the technological dimension but, importantly, how social, organizational and environmental forces affect how IT can be used to manage water, power, transport and telecommunication systems. The book is organized four sections. First, fundamental themes of policy, management, and technology are presented to frame the domain of digital infrastructures. Second, the way in which information technologies are applied in specific infrastructure sectors provides an in-depth assessment of what the advantages and disadvantages have been over time. Third, cross-cutting themes of economics, earth systems engineering, and international sustainability show how various systems perspectives approach some of the barriers to integrating information technology and infrastructure. Finally, the concluding section looks at some of the new directions and challenges being posed by issues such as security.

Digital Infrastructures is the first integrated treatment of how IT technology is fundamentally affecting how critical infrastructures are managed. It is geared to provide the new infrastructure professional with state of the art concepts, methods, and examples for use in creating public policies, strategic plans, and new systems. It will be an essential book for upper level undergraduate and graduate courses in infrastructure management, critical infrastructure, environmental systems management, and management of IT systems.

2003

Moss, M.L. 2003. City and Party Politics New York Observer, July 26,
Abstract

We should not let the prospect of filling hotel rooms and restaurants overshadow the real benefit of hosting the Republican National Convention one year from now. The true value of the convention is that it will allow the city's leaders to forge a direct relationship with the leaders of the federal government. The benefits of building such a bond over the next year could help this city for years to come, not just during the four days in August and September when the Republican Party comes to town.

Moss, M.L. 2003. Gore's Blessing Won't Help Dean New York Observer, December 22,
Abstract

Last week, Howard Dean came to Harlem to receive the endorsement of Mr. Gore. Contrary to popular wisdom, Mr. Gore's endorsement is the kiss of death for Dr. Dean.

Moss, M. 2003. Response, Restoration and Recovery: September 11 and New York City's Digital Networks in A. Micahel Noll ed., Crisis Communications, Allen and Littlefield,
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Abstract

This chapter examines the role of digital communications networks during and after the September 11, 2001, attack on the World Trade Center. Digital networks in New York City played a vital role in all three phases of this catastrophe: initial response, interim restoration, and long-term recovery. Mitchell L Moss and Anthony Townsend conclude that during each of these phases, the digital network infrastructure, while the most fragile of all urban networks, demonstrated remarkable resiliency in serving the citizens of the city and the nation.

2000

Moss, M. L. & Townsend, A. 2000. The Internet Backbone and the American Metropolis Information Society, Jan-March, Vol. 16 Issue 1, p35-47, 13p.
Abstract

Despite the rapid growth of advanced telecommunications services, there is a lack of knowledge about the geographic diffusion of these new technologies. The Internet presents an important challenge to communications researchers, as it threatens to redefine the production and delivery of vital services including finance, retailing, and education. This article seeks to address the gap in the current literature by analyzing the development of Internet backbone networks in the United States between 1997 and 1999. We focus upon the intermetropolitan links that have provided transcontinental data transport services since the demise of the federally subsidized networks deployed in the 1970s and 1980s. We find that a select group of seven highly interconnected metropolitan areas consistently dominated the geography of national data networks, despite massive investment in this infrastructure over the study period. Furthermore, while prosperous and internationally oriented American cities lead the nation in adopting and deploying Internet technologies, interior regions and economically distressed cities have failed to keep up. As information-based industries and services account for an increasing share of economic activity, this evidence suggests that the Internet may aggravate the economic disparities among regions, rather than level them. Although the capacity of the backbone system has slowly diffused throughout the metropolitan system, the geographic structure of interconnecting links has changed little. Finally, the continued persistence of the metropolis as the center for telecommunications networks illustrates the need for a more sophisticated understanding of the interaction between societies and technological innovations.

Moss, M. & Townsend, A. 2000. The Role of the Real City in Cyberspace: Understanding Regional Variations in Internet Accessibility and Utilization Originally Published in Information, Place, and Cyberspace: Issues in Accessibility. D.G. Janelle and D.C. Hodge (eds.). 2000 by Springer-Verlag.
Abstract

Since 1993, when the first graphical web browser, Mosaic, was released into the public domain, the Internet has evolved from an obscure academic and military research network into an international agglomeration of public and private, local and global telecommunications systems. Much of the academic and popular literature has emphasized the distance-shrinking implications and placelessness inherent in these rapidly developing networks. However, the relationship between the physical and political geography of cities and regions and the virtual (or logical) geography of the Internet lacks a strong body of empirical evidence upon which to base such speculation.

This chapter presents the results of a series of studies conducted from June 1996 to August 1998. Our research suggests there is a metropolitan dominance of Internet development by a handful of cities and regions. We identity and describe an emerging structure of "virtual" hubs and pathways which are linking a set of major cities in the United States, suggesting that there is a complex emerging inter-urban communications network that goes far beyond Castells' (1989) informational mode of development.
1999

Moss, M. 1999. Decentralizing Manhattan Office Markets Grid, Vol. 1: No. 1. winter.

Moss, M. 1999. Hold the Phone! Grid, Vol. 1: No. 2, summer .

Moss, M. 1999. The NYSE Masters In-Your-Face Technology Grid, Vol 1: No. 1, winter.

1998

Moss, M. & Mitra, S. 1998. Net Equity: A Report on Income and Internet Access Journal of Urban Technology, Vol. 5: No. 3, Dec. .

Moss, M. 1998. Technology and Cities Cityscape, Vol. 53: No. 3.

1997

Moss, M. L. 1997. Reinventing the Central City as a Place to Live and Work Housing Policy Debate, Vol. 8, Issue 2.
Abstract

Public policies for urban development have traditionally emphasized investment in physical infrastructure, the development of large-scale commercial facilities, the construction of new housing, and the renewal of existing neighborhoods. Most efforts to revitalize central cities by building new facilities for visitors have focused on suburban commuters and tourists. At the same time, many housing initiatives in central cities have concentrated on low-income communities because outlying suburban areas have attracted traditional middle-income households.

This article argues that emerging demographic and cultural trends - combined with changes in the structure of business organizations and technological advances - provide new opportunities for cities to retain and attract middle-class households. Using gay and lesbian populations as an example, it focuses on the role that nontraditional households can play in urban redevelopment. In light of the rise of nontraditional households and the growth of self-employment and small businesses, cities should adopt policies that make them attractive places in which to live and work.

 

Moss, M. 1997. Tracking the 'Net: Using Domain Names to Measure the Growth of the Internet in U.S. Cities Journal of Urban Technology, Vol. 4: No. 3.

1995

Moss, M. 1995. Where's the Power in the Empowerment Zone? City Journal, spring.

In the Press

12/18/2014
New York City subway extension may transform Manhattan neighborhood
Reuters
12/10/2014
Olympics opponent becomes a believer
The Boston Globe
12/08/2014
Horse-drawn carriages still a bane for NY mayor
USA Today
11/17/2014
Futuristic island park in Hudson River proposed for Manhattan
Reuters
11/11/2014
Diversity rises as NYC dwellers move to the burbs
The Journal News
11/06/2014
Real Estate Board of New York big winner as Republicans take the state Senate
New York Business Journal
11/04/2014
1 World Trade Center opens, awkwardly
Capital New York
11/03/2014
World Trade Center reopens for business
Associated Press
11/01/2014
Any storm in a Port
New York Post
10/21/2014
Cuomo announces plan to overhaul airports
Wall Street Journal
10/07/2014
MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast Seeks Support For $32B Capital Plan
CBS New York
10/02/2014
Gary Barnett, Controversial Master of New York City Luxury Real Estate
Business Week
10/01/2014
Who wants to host 2022 Winter Olympics? Only 2 cities left in the race
CBS News
09/23/2014
For key lawmaker, elected Port Authority commissioners could be route to reform
NJ.com
09/17/2014
Trottenberg Talks About Expanding Cycling in the de Blasio Era
Streetsblog
09/12/2014
7 train to New Jersey?
Fox NY News
09/03/2014
Commuter traffic from Jersey expected to double by 2030
Real Estate Weekly
08/22/2014
Super-commuting: Good for your career, bad for your life?
Market Watch
08/20/2014
Hint of Scandal Embroils Queens Library’s Leaders
The New York Times
08/19/2014
De Blasio Encounters Rising Friction Over Liberal Expectations
The New York Times
08/12/2014
NY's restaurants may fall victim to the city's success
CNBC
08/08/2014
Clintons Support de Blasio's Push to Bring Democratic Convention to Brooklyn
The New York Times
07/27/2014
NYC's aging bus terminal to get patchwork fixes
SF Gate
07/25/2014
Shipping crates get new 'lease' on life
Reuters
07/17/2014
Cuomo Helps Broker Deal in LIRR Negotiations
NY1
07/09/2014
Changing face of New York real estate
FoxNY.com
06/11/2014
L.I.R.R. Popularity Led to Crush After the Belmont
New York Times
06/09/2014
LIRR strike looms as MTA, unions continue impasse
Newsday
06/02/2014
Staten Island 2024: Is the change ahead a good thing?
SI Live
05/29/2014
Why doesn't anyone want to host the Olympics?
CBS This Morning
05/27/2014
Should Citi Bike Pay New York City $1 Million in Parking Fees?
Slate
05/23/2014
Big plans in works for NYC's gritty 'Wild West'
The Wall Street Journal
05/14/2014
Bloomberg Ally Revives NY Olympics Pitch
Financial Times
05/12/2014
Parking-ticket data can reveal hometown of driver: Pratt professor
New York Post
05/08/2014
The Separation of Church and Real Estate
Bloomberg Businessweek
04/28/2014
In NYC, a $185M tunnel that leads nowhere, for now
AP
04/25/2014
For de Blasio, Carriage Horse Ban Is No Walk in the Park
The New York Times
04/23/2014
Port Authority at Crossroads as World Trade Funds Debated
Bloomberg
04/21/2014
Commissioners should name Port Authority executive director, panelists say
The Star-Ledger
04/12/2014
The first 100 days: running the rule over five big-city mayors
The Guardian
04/08/2014
Wagner Proposes Reforms To Ailing Port Authority
NYU Local
04/04/2014
Acting Port Authority chair cautions against splitting up agency in 'heat of the political moment'
The Star-Ledger
04/01/2014
Report Traces Port Authority’s Flaws to a Crumbling Business Model
The New York Times
03/28/2014
New York City Boom Heaven Sent for Churches Selling Land
Bloomberg
03/10/2014
Public transportation at its highest level since 1956
NPR
02/28/2014
After Spike Lee Rips Into Gentrification, He Refuses to Back Down From Backlash
Atlanta BlackStar
02/27/2014
Spike Lee explains expletive-filled gentrification rant
CNN
02/02/2014
Who's to Blame? Lessons from Atlanta Snow Storm
CBN News
01/19/2014
For Super Bowl Jet-and-Helicopter Set, Urging Buses and Rail
The New York Times
01/15/2014
Don’t Mess With My Commute
The New York Observer
12/31/2013
The White House Would Be A Step Down
The New York Times
12/30/2013
Assessing Bloomberg's Legacy Is A Complex Task
WSHU Public Radio
12/18/2013
Officials ready up for winter-weather Super Bowl
SportsIllustrated.com
12/17/2013
Bloom-ing ‘hoods and preserved treasures — all thanks to Mike
New York Post
12/04/2013
New York: A concrete legacy
Financial Times
11/15/2013
New York’s Coming Baseball Famine
New York Observer
11/10/2013
Christie, de Blasio similarities buried by pair of landslides
NorthJersey.com
10/24/2013
Garden Renovations Come With a Tug of War
The New York Times
10/02/2013
A Great Mayor Says Goodbye
The New York Observer
09/26/2013
Hers to Lose: Inside Christine Quinn's Bid for Mayor [Video]
The New York Times
09/14/2013
A tale of two cities: poor New Yorkers demand a slice of Manhattan's action
The Guardian
09/12/2013
Forgive? No, a Night to Forget for Scandal-Tarred Candidates
The New York Times
09/11/2013
New York Mayoral Race's Comeback Kid Is de Blasio, Not Weiner
KVNU-AM/FM
08/29/2013
New York's 2012 Would-be Olympic village area to be turned into affordable housing
Daily News
08/15/2013
Bike lanes the new site of midtown turf wars
AM New York
08/14/2013
Is New York mayor the most powerful in the world?
Punjab Newsline
07/17/2013
The Bloomberg Legacy
The New York Times
06/20/2013
New Call to Move MSG
Wall Street Journal
04/26/2013
Sequester Cancels Much-Anticipated Fleet Week in New York
Daily Beast
04/25/2013
New York church holds $2 billion in assets
UPI
04/17/2013
Bigger Fines for Defacing City’s Streets to Save a Spot
The New York Times
04/10/2013
Anthony Weiner Could Win New York City Mayoral Election, Strategists Say
ABC News
04/08/2013
Buying a House? Selling? They Can Do Your Taxes, Too
New York Times
03/10/2013
Sen. Schumer to Push for Storm 'Bank'
The Wall Street Journal
03/01/2013
A discussion about the Marron Institute
Charlie Rose Show
02/22/2013
Gov Cuomo Shows No Urgency In Appointing Next Chair Of NY MTA
WNYC
02/18/2013
‘Organic’ Dry Cleaners Can Serve as Barometer of Gentrification
The New York Times
02/15/2013
Creating Hipsturbia
The New York Times
02/14/2013
American Airlines merger a boost for NY
Crain's New York
02/10/2013
Doubting if Tomorrow Will Ever Come for Taxi
The New York Times
02/04/2013
Q@A Ed Koch's Life and Legacy
Time
02/02/2013
Beacon in Big Apple’s dark days
New York Post
02/01/2013
Even out of office, Ed Koch was never out of sight
NY Daily News
12/14/2012
Social Media Strategy Was Crucial as Transit Agencies Coped With Hurricane
The New York Times
12/12/2012
CHARTS: Whites Ride Transit Less Often Than Everyone Else
WNYC Transportation Nation
12/10/2012
Analysis: How the $60B Sandy Aid Will Be Spent
WNYC
12/09/2012
Census Data Show Public Transit Gender Gap
WNYC Transportation Nation
11/28/2012
Adaptive Transportation: Bicycling Through Sandy’s Aftermath
Project for Public Spaces
11/27/2012
Survey Says: After Hurricane Sandy, Cyclists Were NYC's Commuter Kings
Gothamist
11/26/2012
Sandy Data Shows NYC Commuters Are Transpo-Adaptable: Report
WNYC Transportation Nation
11/25/2012
Post-Sandy Survey Ranks Transit Rancor
The Wall Street Journal
11/14/2012
BMW Shows Off Its New ‘i’ Brand Electrics in New York
The New York Times
11/04/2012
What Could It Cost to Repair the Subway System?
Wall Street Journal
10/31/2012
Sandy debunks 'nanny state' [Commentary]
CNN
10/24/2012
Cuban Missile Crisis, 50 Years Ago, Had the City and the World Worried
New York Times
10/16/2012
Ford C-Max Energi Plug-in Hybrid Is Certified at 620 Miles of Range
The New York Times Wheels Blog
10/09/2012
Infographic: How Far Can You Travel on a Single Subway Fare?
WNYC Transportation Nation
10/04/2012
In Debate on Domestic Policy, No Talk of Cities
The New York Times
09/27/2012
New York City to get 'world's largest' Ferris wheel
Fox News
09/19/2012
Appraisal Institute talks synergy
Real Estate Weekly
08/27/2012
When the Vice Presidency Was a Job for New Yorkers
New York Times
08/22/2012
Super-commuters: How far would you travel for a paycheck?
Press-Republican
08/16/2012
Sour economy gives rise to extreme commuters
USA Today
08/15/2012
New York City Had Higher Tourism Numbers Than London During 2012 Olympics
Travelers Today
08/13/2012
During Olympics, New York City has more tourists than London
Smart Planet
08/01/2012
What if NYC Had Won its Bid To Host the 2012 Olympic Games?
WNYC
07/31/2012
What If the 2012 Olympics Had Been in New York?
Grantland
07/30/2012
Mitt Romney replicates George Pataki’s strategy
Washington Post Blog
07/29/2012
Amid Budgetary Risk and Fragility, N.Y.'s MTA Conveys a Happier Tone
The Bond Buyer
07/18/2012
Using the Olympics to Stimulate Urban Growth
Huffington Post
07/17/2012
NYU Expansion Plans Go Before City Council Committees
NY1
07/15/2012
NYC to decide on controversial NYU growth plan
Glens Falls Post-Star
07/12/2012
Rise in crime could push stop-and-frisk off the 2013 agenda
Capital New York
07/01/2012
Giant Ferris wheel could provide economic boost for Staten Island
Staten Island Advance
06/28/2012
London Olympics billions over budget, study shows
CBS This Morning
06/23/2012
Edward N. Costikyan, Adviser to New York Politicians, Is Dead at 87
New York Times
06/14/2012
Obama in New York: What he'll discover at One World Trade Center
Christian Science Monitor
06/11/2012
Sky-high stakes in airline bankruptcy [Commentary]
Crain's
05/22/2012
N.Y. MTA's East Side Access: Add $1B and Three Years
The Bond Buyer
05/21/2012
Urbanite Mitchell Moss on sidewalks, subways and gentrification
AM New York
05/18/2012
'Supercommuters' board airplanes to get to work
NPR Marketplace
05/16/2012
Houston leads the nation in super commuters — including 51,900 who drive to work from Dallas
Houston CultureMap
05/14/2012
Shuster: President Will Sign Transpo Bill In the Fall
WNYC
05/13/2012
Commissions Multiply Under Cuomo
The Wall Street Journal
05/09/2012
May the Schwartz Be With You: Gridlock Sam Wants to Turn New York Traffic On Its Head - the Same Thing He's Done for 40 Years
New York Observer
05/03/2012
One World Trade Center Rises, Along With Its Rents
Bloomberg Businessweek
04/30/2012
Occupy movement's May Day turnout seen as test for its future
Reuters
04/23/2012
Walmart May Lose Traction in NYC After Mexico Bribery Scandal
WNYC
04/21/2012
13,700 of us commute from Rockford to Chicago every day
Rockford Register Star
04/20/2012
Where Chicago's super-commuters live
Crain's Chicago Business
04/19/2012
More tech companies paying for CEOs to 'super commute' from homes in other states
Peninsula Press
04/17/2012
Are you Calgary's ultimate super commuter?
Calgary Herald
04/16/2012
They take the early bus: Meet New York's super commuters
AM New York
04/12/2012
The Long Road Home: Super-Commuters on the Rise
NBC Nightly News
04/11/2012
Lawyers part of 'super-commuter' trend
The Indiana Lawyer
04/10/2012
NYC Ranked As Leading Global City
Washington Square News
04/07/2012
The Rise of the Super Commuter
Financial Post
04/05/2012
The Super Commuter Commitment
Nightly Business Report
04/02/2012
Are the Olympics More Trouble Than They're Worth? New York Is Lucky Not to Have the Games [Op-ed]
The New York Times
03/27/2012
Boycott Plan at Food Co-op Is Opposed by City Officials
New York Times
03/21/2012
Commuters Covering Long Distances, Multiple Cities
STL Today
03/20/2012
Map | Growing Group of Super-Commuters Flock to Manhattan
WNYC AM/FM
03/04/2012
Supercommuting takes off, even as gas prices rise
Austin Statesman
02/28/2012
The Rise of the Super Commuter
The Atlantic: Cities
02/27/2012
'Super Commuter' Emerges
CNBC
02/23/2012
Super-Commuters: More Forced To Deal With Huge Commutes In Weak Economy
Huffington Post
02/22/2012
Techies on the cutting edge... of bike commuting
Transportation Nation
01/24/2012
Newt vs New York [Commentary]
Huffington Post
01/09/2012
Northeast Struck by Casino Fever
Bond Buyer
01/08/2012
MTA, Union Headed for a Showdown
Crain's
01/02/2012
MTA Reduces Subway Service on a Few Minor Holidays
New York Times
12/20/2011
Using Hutch? Heavy holiday traffic likely
Journal News
12/19/2011
Transportation Planners Identify Worst Traffic Bottlenecks In NYC Area
WCBS-AM
12/08/2011
Subway Riders Get the Shaft [Commentary]
New York Times
12/04/2011
New York's failed shot at the Olympics has a happy ending
New York Daily News
11/28/2011
From Printing Press to Bench Press: Bronze Metal
The Wall Street Journal
11/27/2011
From Ashes of Olympic Bid, a Future Rises for the Far West Side
New York Times
11/23/2011
Taxman Preoccupies Wall Street to Upper East Side in IRS Levies
Bloomberg
11/22/2011
New York City's swankiest neighborhoods are footing much of the country's tax bill, IRS data shows
NY Daily News
11/18/2011
With expulsion from Zuccotti Park and numbers dwindling, Occupy Wall Street movement looks old
NY Daily News
11/13/2011
Traffic to Stymie Even the Batmobile Shows the Two Sides of Movie Production
New York Times
10/31/2011
Cuomo's Pick to Run MTA and Port Usher in New Era
The Bond Buyer
10/20/2011
N.Y.-N.J. Port Authority OKs Cuomo's Pick, Patrick Foye, for Top Spot
Bond Buyer
10/13/2011
Privately Owned Park, Open to the Public, May Make Its Own Rules
New York Times
10/04/2011
N.J. Gov. Christie says he won't run for president
McClatchy Newspapers
09/30/2011
On Facebook, Neighborhoods as They Once Were
The New York Times
09/27/2011
Port Authority Goes Long for World Trade Center
The Bond Buyer
09/16/2011
The Long Process to Rebuild Lower Manhattan [Commentary]
Russell Sage Foundation
09/15/2011
The Lost Liberal GOP
Politico
09/12/2011
Polling Israel in NY-9
Politico
09/06/2011
Janette Sadik-Khan Is the Best Mechanic the City Streets Have Had in a Generation, So Why Do Motorists Hate Her So Much?
The New York Observer
08/29/2011
NY Subway Running in Time for Morning Commute
New York Times
08/17/2011
A toll hike we have to swallow: Port Authority needs money to keep bridges & tunnels in shape [Commentary]
NY Daily News
08/08/2011
Cuomo Appoints Panel to Choose New Transit Chief
New York Times
08/04/2011
The Reinvention of Rahm Emanuel
Business Weeek
07/28/2011
Class Struggle [Commentary]
The Architect's Newspaper
07/15/2011
Opinion: Tom Coburn Wrong On Behavioral Research [Commentary]
Politico
06/27/2011
Same-Sex Marriage: Obama is not Cuomo, Part I
Washington Post
06/23/2011
Champion of Cities
Wall Street Journal
06/13/2011
East River Ferry Service, with 7 Stops, Starts Run
The New York Times
06/07/2011
Let Us Give Thanks (Commentary)
New York Times
03/31/2011
For Fifth Avenue by the Park, 2 East Sides
The New York Times
03/27/2011
Census shows major city changes
Crain's
03/15/2011
Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer Calls for Local and National Action to Repair New York's Broken Infrastructure
Office of the Manhattan Borough President
03/07/2011
Brooklyn increases in population, wealth
Washington Square News
02/01/2011
The World's Biggest College Town
New York Observer
12/09/2010
Bridge and Tunnel Types
The New York Times
12/06/2010
Andrew Cuomo Dreams Of Electric Cars, But Lacks Clear Funding Stream
City Hall News
11/29/2010
Mayor Hasn't Been Meek About School Control
Wall Street Journal
11/16/2010
NY Governor-Elect Cuomo Announces Transportation Transition Team
Transportation Nation
11/15/2010
Wives in Short Supply Among NY's New Elected Pols
DNAinfo
11/14/2010
The School That Ate New York
New York
11/05/2010
Can California and New York be Saved? [commentary]
The New York Times
11/03/2010
Governor Faces a Tough Road
The Wall Street Journal
10/26/2010
NYC Just Ain't That Smart?
Metro
10/22/2010
Your Life, Your Map
The New York Times
10/13/2010
C anceled NJ tunnel reflects mood on spending
Reuters
10/11/2010
Hevesi in Handcuffs
Politico
09/05/2010
Silver's $200 million slush fund
New York Post
08/27/2010
New Skyscraper to Compete with Empire State Bldg.
AOL
08/26/2010
Newark is entering 'new frontier' with idea to sell municipal buildings in time to close budget gap
Newark Star Ledger
08/25/2010
Unwelcome Neighbor for Empire State Building
The New York Times
08/12/2010
BP Spill: Catastrophe, Sure. Disaster? Nah.
Mother Jones
08/03/2010
Conde Nast to Move to Skyscraper at Ground Zero
New York Times
07/24/2010
A Racial U-Turn
New York Magazine
07/18/2010
RSVP to Me, Mayor Mike!
The New York Post
06/29/2010
Ray 'Stop-and-Frisk' Kelly for Mayor?
Village Voice
06/27/2010
Wall Street Career Dogs New Deputy Mayor
Crain's
05/12/2010
The Struggle to Preserve the Brooklyn Navy Yard
The New York Times
05/02/2010
Commishing upon a star
NY Post
04/29/2010
Harvard's Glaeser: Jacobs was Wrong (About Preservation).
New York O bserver
04/28/2010
Kirsten Gillibrand: Last Woman Standing
Huffington Post
04/15/2010
The Capitol Pressroom
WCNY
04/03/2010
Mayor Mike's 3rd Term Blues
New York Post
03/27/2010
Struggling Towns Must Evolve or Die (commentary)
The New York Times
03/22/2010
Despite Much Rezoning, Scant Change in Residential Capacity
New York Times
03/09/2010
Series of political scandals bodes poorly for Albany
Washington Square News
03/06/2010
Democratic Trainwreck
The Daily Beast
03/04/2010
New York Gone Wild
Politico
02/28/2010
Next Problem: Governing New York
New York Times
02/23/2010
Orthodox Scandals Could Harm Power Base, Experts Warn
The Jewish Week
12/23/2009
Liu Courts the Press in Many Languages
New York Times
11/02/2009
Fiscal Blood on the Tracks (op-ed)
The New York Times
10/15/2009
Bloomberg Has Added Jobs, and Lost Some, Too
New York Times
10/08/2009
Money Draws Film Shoots to the Area
Albany Times-Union
09/29/2009
How New York City's Seven Newspapers Are (Nearly) Surviving
Village Voice
09/15/2009
Two Fashion Stalwarts, Reared on Same Bronx Catwalk
New York Times
09/10/2009
Recession Gives Jolt to Jobless Residents
The Riverdale Press
09/01/2009
Ted Kennedy's Death Ends Era of Irish Power (opinion)
Politico
08/19/2009
What - You Want Responsibility?
New York Post
08/17/2009
The Untouchable: Can a Good Mayor Amass Too Much Power?
The New Yorker
08/12/2009
FiOS Enrolls at NYU
Multichannel News
07/26/2009
SUV idling issue shows Mayor Mike Bloomberg may have more blind spots
NY Daily News
07/16/2009
Coney Island Plans Rouse Ire
Forbes
07/13/2009
Tracking Business Services: Best and Worst Cities for High-Paying Jobs
New Geography.com
07/02/2009
Gilly Meets Her Match In Maloney
New York Post
06/19/2009
Queens: The borough that deserves more respect
New York Daily News
05/31/2009
New York: Metropolis Born of a Merger
The New York Times
05/08/2009
To the Hardy, Lady Liberty’s Crown Beckons Anew
The New York Times
04/23/2009
Amanda Burden: Supermarket Zoning Plan Weeks Away
The New York Observer
04/15/2009
As Finance Offices Empty, Developers Rethink Ground Zero
The New York Times
04/06/2009
Workers follow jobs to suburbs; Companies shift from downtowns for lower costs
USA Today
04/02/2009
The Long Buildup Before the New Buildings
The New York Times
03/27/2009
N.Y. Ready for its Close-up (op-ed)
Albany Times-Union
03/26/2009
U.S. unprepared for a disaster, prof says
Washington Square News
03/17/2009
Is NY Better Off?
New York Post
03/16/2009
Disaster Relief Needs to be Faster
UPI
03/14/2009
Main Federal Disaster Relief Law Has Fallen Behind Modern Threat Levels
TerraDaily.com
03/13/2009
Main federal disaster relief law has fallen behind modern threat levels, NYU professor finds
ScienceBlog
02/27/2009
Gillibrand in U.S. News & World Report
Albany Times Union.com
02/03/2009
The Future of New York City
WNYC The Brian Lehrer Show
01/31/2009
Ad drought ravages media firms
Crain's
01/26/2009
Don't Let Red Tape Stymie Stimulus (op-ed)
NY Post
01/24/2009
Gillibrand’s Upstate New York Politics May Not Appeal Statewide
Bloomberg News
01/16/2009
Legacy Vs. Re-election
NY Daily News
01/10/2009
In New York, no crisis for niche manufacturers
The New York Times
12/18/2008
Wonderful? Sorry, George, It’s a Pitiful, Dreadful Life
The New York Times
12/16/2008
Caroline Kennedy launches Senate campaign
Los Angeles Times
12/01/2008
Obama advisers could include five with New York ties
Newsday
11/26/2008
Free Holiday Turkeys, a Ritual in Decline
The New York Times
10/31/2008
The Primal Loft
The New York Times
10/27/2008
Why Meltdown Won't Stop NYC (op-ed)
New York Post
10/15/2008
Debating the Pros and Cons of Term Limits
The New York Times.com
10/04/2008
Dion, Fey a duo for odd time
Crain's
09/17/2008
Wall St. crisis spreads to real estate projects
Metro
09/16/2008
Wall Street Troubles: Are They Too Much to Bear?
The Washington Post
09/01/2008
More Kindred Spirits: Mitchell Moss and 'Market Urbanism' Blog
New York Sun
07/07/2008
New Yorkers wooed for their money
Financial Times
07/05/2008
You Had a Friend in Albany (op-ed)
The New York Times
06/27/2008
Foreign Investment in City is Growing, Report Says
The New York Times
05/22/2008
Death By 'Preservation' (op-ed)
New York Post
05/14/2008
Ex-FEMA chief urges revamping disaster legislation
Arkansas Democrat Gazette
05/07/2008
Panelists Press Congress to Rewrite Law Governing Federal Disaster Response
Government Executive.com
04/13/2008
Bloomberg Reshapes City Despite High-Profile Setbacks
Newsday
03/11/2008
How Scandal Shot Down Spitzer the 'Sheriff'
Newsday
03/06/2008
Buying City Hall
Forbes
03/03/2008
Unease Erodes Ambition in Real Estate
The New York Sun