Poverty

The Supplemental Poverty Measure and Communities of Color

The Supplemental Poverty Measure and Communities of Color

Women of Color Policy Network
03/01/2011

With nearly 44 million individuals living in poverty, including 24 million people of color, the anticipated publication of the Supplemental Poverty Measure in the fall of 2011 provides an opportunity to review our nation's progress towards poverty alleviation and collaboratively strategize ways to ensure that anti-poverty efforts are inclusive of the most vulnerable segments of society. This policy brief explains how the new measure will help policymakers, researchers, and advocates better understand the breadth and depth of poverty's impact on communities of color.

The Impact of Recent Budget Proposals on Women of Color, Their Families, and Communities

The Impact of Recent Budget Proposals on Women of Color, Their Families, and Communities

Women of Color Policy Network
02/01/2011

The House and Presidential budget proposals released in February of 2011 include plans to reduce or eliminate funding to key programs that assist low-income families and communities of color. This policy brief highlights the detrimental impact of the proposed social spending cuts and emphasizes the need to invest in the long-term economic security of women of color, their families, and communities.

Credit is Not a Right

Credit is Not a Right

Gershman, John and Jonathan Morduch.
01/01/2011

Is credit a human right? Muhammad Yunus, the most visible leader of a global movement to provide microcredit to world’s poor, says it should be. NYU’s John Gershman and FAI’s Jonathan Morduch disagree. In their new paper, Credit is Not a Right, they ask whether a rights-based approach to microcredit will in fact be effective in making quality, affordable credit more available to poor families – and, more importantly, whether it is a constructive step in terms of the broader goal of global poverty reduction. Jonathan Morduch argues his case in this video.

Borrowing to Save

Borrowing to Save
Journal of Globalization and Development 102 (2), December 2010.

Jonathan Morduch
12/01/2010

Poor families often borrow even when they have savings sufficient to cover the loan. The practice is costly relative to drawing down one’s own savings, and it seems particularly puzzling in poor communities.  The families themselves explain that it is easier to repay a moneylender than to “repay” oneself, an explanation in line with recent findings in behavioral economics.  In this context, high interest rates on loans can help instill discipline.  While workable, the mechanism is hardly optimal; options could be improved through access to a contractual saving device that helps savers rebuild assets after a major withdrawal.

Using cross-curricular, problem-based learning to promote understanding of poverty in urban communities

Using cross-curricular, problem-based learning to promote understanding of poverty in urban communities
Journal of Social Work Education, 46(1), 147 – 156.

Gardner, D., Tuchman, E., & Hawkins, R.
11/01/2010

This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach students about the scope and consequences of urban poverty through an innovative cross-curricular project. We illustrate the process, goals, and tasks of the Community Assessment Project, which incorporates community-level assessment, collection and analysis of public data, and social policy analysis and planning. Students in three master's classes (Social Work Research I, Ending Poverty: Models for Social Change and Social Action, and Advanced Social Policy in Aging) worked in self-directed groups to explore the impact of economic insecurity on our most vulnerable clients. The project engaged students, linked research and policy practice, and helped to educate the next generation of social workers about urban poverty and strategies for community-based research and practice.

Income and Poverty in Communities of Color

Income and Poverty in Communities of Color

Women of Color Policy Network
09/01/2010

The U.S. Census Bureau’s recent statistics on income highlight the need for increased social supports for working families, the allocation of additional funds to create quality jobs with good wages, and the development of bold and targeted policies to help individuals and groups disproportionately impacted by the recession recover.

The Economics of Microfinance, 2nd edition

The Economics of Microfinance, 2nd edition
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Beatriz Armendáriz and Jonathan Morduch
06/01/2010

Contents:

1 Rethinking Banking 

2 Why Intervene in Credit Markets? 

3 Roots of Microfinance: ROSCAs and Credit Cooperatives

4 Group Lending

5 Beyond Group Lending

6 Savings and Insurance

7 Gender

8 Commercialization and Regulation

9 Measuring Impacts

10 Subsidy and Sustainability

11 Managing Microfinance 

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