Jason Franklin
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Administration

Jason has a background in philanthropy education, nonprofit strategy and leadership, and urban policy and education advocacy. He serves as Executive Director of Bolder Giving, a nonprofit organization seeking to inspire people to give at their full lifetime giving potential. He is also a Lecturer on Public Administration and Doctoral Candidate at New York University's Wagner School of Public Service. His research focuses on the role of charitable foundations in the policy making process. Jason teaches courses on philanthropy, nonprofit management, and public policy including Philanthropy, Advocacy & Social Change; Strategic Management for Public Service Organizations; and Theory and Practice of Grantmaking. He was the Distinguished Doctoral Teacher of the Year in both 2009 and 2010.

He is an experienced national donor educator and leader with over a decade of volunteer, professional and scholarly experience in philanthropic and social change work. He serves on the boards of Resource Generation, Proteus Fund, North Star Fund, and Social Justice Philanthropy Collaborative and on the advisory board of Wealth for the Common Good. Prior to his work with Bolder Giving, he worked at the 21st Century School Fund where he most recently served as Deputy Director. Previously, he coordinated the Rockefeller Foundation's Next Generation Leadership Network housed at the NYU Research Center for Leadership in Action and has also worked for the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, White House Office of National AIDS Policy, and Oregon Commission on Children and Families.

A serial social entrepreneur, he co-founded Oregon Students Supporting Education (a statewide student organizing effort that helped prevent major budget cuts to Oregon public schools), the Multnomah Youth Commission (a youth-led agency that advises city and county leaders on program and policy decisions), and IAM LLC (an urban brownfield development planning firm that won the 2004 Goldman Sachs Global Social Venture Competition). He has an MS in Urban Policy and Nonprofit Management from the New School's Milano Graduate School and a BA in Political Communication from the George Washington University.

 

Semester Course
Summer 2013 PADM-GP.2110.001 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


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Fall 2013 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


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Spring 2011 UPADM-GP.224.001 Philanthropy, Advocacy and Social Change

With over $550 billion dollars in assets and contributions exceeding $36 billion/year, private charitable foundations are a source of concentrated social and political influence in American society. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the roles and influence (positive and negative) of philanthropy on political advocacy and social change movements in the US; the scope and diversity of the philanthropic sector; political advocacy approaches and tactics; and examples of current philanthropic involvement in advocacy and social change movements across the political spectrum. The course will include several guest speakers -- both philanthropic leaders and activists -- and site visits with funders to local advocacy efforts in New York City.


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Fall 2010 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 UPADM-GP.0224.001 Philanthropy, Advocacy and Social Change

With over $550 billion dollars in assets and contributions exceeding $36 billion/year, private charitable foundations are a source of concentrated social and political influence in American society. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the roles and influence (positive and negative) of philanthropy on political advocacy and social change movements in the US; the scope and diversity of the philanthropic sector; political advocacy approaches and tactics; and examples of current philanthropic involvement in advocacy and social change movements across the political spectrum. The course will include several guest speakers -- both philanthropic leaders and activists -- and site visits with funders to local advocacy efforts in New York City.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


Download Syllabus
Summer 2009 PADM-GP.2110.001 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 CORE-GP.1022.001 Introduction to Public Policy

Introduction to Public Policy covers a wide range of topics, from the norms and values informing democratic policymaking to the basics of cost-benefit and other tools of policy analysis. Though emphases will differ based on instructor strengths, all sections will address the institutional arrangements for making public policy decisions, the role of various actors-including nonprofit and private-sector professionals-in shaping policy outcomes, and the fundamentals (and limits) of analytic approaches to public policy.

Note: Students who have not taken an American Government course in many years, and need to brush up on knowledge of the basic design and functions of the governmental units in the United States, are strongly encouraged to take Introduction to Governance (NONCR-0989) module prior to taking Introduction to Public Policy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 PADM-GP.2110.001 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 NONCR-GP.0989.001 Introduction to Governance

This course is intended to provide a brief overview of how the United States is governed as a basis for further coursework as a graduate student at the Wagner School. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will understand the: process through which the current system of governance in America was developed; branches of the federal government, including their powers and composition; election process and the role of political parties and interest groups; dominant US political ideologies; and general functions of state and local governments.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 UPADM-GP.0224.001 Philanthropy, Advocacy and Social Change

With over $550 billion dollars in assets and contributions exceeding $36 billion/year, private charitable foundations are a source of concentrated social and political influence in American society. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the roles and influence (positive and negative) of philanthropy on political advocacy and social change movements in the US; the scope and diversity of the philanthropic sector; political advocacy approaches and tactics; and examples of current philanthropic involvement in advocacy and social change movements across the political spectrum. The course will include several guest speakers -- both philanthropic leaders and activists -- and site visits with funders to local advocacy efforts in New York City.


Download Syllabus
Summer 2008 PADM-GP.2110.001 Strategic Management

This is a required course for the management specialization.

This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 CORE-GP.1022.002 Introduction to Public Policy

Introduction to Public Policy covers a wide range of topics, from the norms and values informing democratic policymaking to the basics of cost-benefit and other tools of policy analysis. Though emphases will differ based on instructor strengths, all sections will address the institutional arrangements for making public policy decisions, the role of various actors-including nonprofit and private-sector professionals-in shaping policy outcomes, and the fundamentals (and limits) of analytic approaches to public policy.

Note: Students who have not taken an American Government course in many years, and need to brush up on knowledge of the basic design and functions of the governmental units in the United States, are strongly encouraged to take Introduction to Governance (NONCR-0989) module prior to taking Introduction to Public Policy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 UPADM-GP.0224.001 Philanthropy, Advocacy and Social Change

With over $550 billion dollars in assets and contributions exceeding $36 billion/year, private charitable foundations are a source of concentrated social and political influence in American society. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the roles and influence (positive and negative) of philanthropy on political advocacy and social change movements in the US; the scope and diversity of the philanthropic sector; political advocacy approaches and tactics; and examples of current philanthropic involvement in advocacy and social change movements across the political spectrum. The course will include several guest speakers -- both philanthropic leaders and activists -- and site visits with funders to local advocacy efforts in New York City.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 PADM-GP.1790. Governance Qualifying Examination
The Governance Qualifying Examination is graded on a pass-fail basis, and administered at least three times per academic year. Students must register for the examination via Torchtone or Albert. The content of the exam will flow directly from the topics outlined in the syllabus and covered in the relevant chapters of American Government. The exam is in a multiple choice and true/false format.
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Date Publication/Paper
2009

Stewart, R.A. & Franklin, J. 2009. Introduction Journal of Arts Management, Law and Society, Fall 2009
Abstract