Sarah Sheon Gerecke
Adjunct Associate Professor of Planning

Sarah Gerecke is Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Office of Housing Counseling at the US Department of Housing and Urban Development, a program whose mission is to ensure that families have the knowledge they need to obtain, sustain and retain their homes through HUD's network of 2,400 approved housing counseling agencies.  She has also contributed to policy relating to the FHA mortgage insurance program, the National Mortgage Servicing Settlement, and HUD's response to Hurricane Sandy.  Until 2011, she was Executive Director of the Furman Center. Sarah is also an Adjunct Associate Professor of Planning at the NYU Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service where she teaches a seminar in land use, housing and community development in New York City to Wagner and Law students. Until July 2009, she was Chief Executive Officer of Neighborhood Housing Services (NHS) of NYC, where she supervised lending, education, community development and real estate programs that resulted in $185 million invested in underserved communities in 2008, assisting over 11,000 residents. She joined NHS as Chief Operating Officer in 2001. From 1994-2001, Sarah was Vice President for Housing Programs at Westhab, Inc., Westchester's largest provider of housing for homeless and disadvantaged residents, where she supervised supportive housing and transitional residential programs.

Sarah served in various positions in New York City government between 1986 and 1994, including Assistant Commissioner for Production and Planning for the Department of Housing Preservation and Development and Assistant to Deputy Mayor Robert Esnard. From 1984 - 1986, she practiced real estate law for Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison. She is a graduate of Harvard Law School (magna cum laude) and Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs (cum laude). Ms. Gerecke was a New York City Urban Fellow and has received numerous awards including HPD Outstanding Alumna. She lives in the Bronx.

 

Semester Course
Fall 2012 URPL-GP.2670.001 Land Use, Housing and Community Development Seminar

This interdisciplinary seminar brings together law, urban planning and public policy students to analyze historical and contemporary trends in affordable housing, community development, land use, and housing finance using New York City as a laboratory that is both unique from, and similar to, other American cities.  The course focuses on housing/community development policy, real estate and mortgage financing, subsidies, community participation, environmental impact, and neighborhood change such as gentrification and displacement, with particular emphasis upon how issues of race, poverty, and the economic climate affect federal, state, local and community responses.  We will discuss the causes and consequences of government intervention in housing and neighborhoods, developing tools for students to determine the need for public intervention, the optimal design and financing of housing and community development programs, and how to evaluate success. 

Permission of instructors required to register. Please contact Academic Services to register.

The course is taught at the School of Law.
 


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 URPL-GP.2670.001 Land Use, Housing and Community Development Seminar

This interdisciplinary seminar brings together law, urban planning and public policy students to analyze historical and contemporary trends in affordable housing, community development, land use, and housing finance using New York City as a laboratory that is both unique from, and similar to, other American cities.  The course focuses on housing/community development policy, real estate and mortgage financing, subsidies, community participation, environmental impact, and neighborhood change such as gentrification and displacement, with particular emphasis upon how issues of race, poverty, and the economic climate affect federal, state, local and community responses.  We will discuss the causes and consequences of government intervention in housing and neighborhoods, developing tools for students to determine the need for public intervention, the optimal design and financing of housing and community development programs, and how to evaluate success. 

Permission of instructors required to register. Please contact Academic Services to register.

The course is taught at the School of Law.
 


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 URPL-GP.2670.001 Land Use, Housing and Community Development Seminar

This interdisciplinary seminar brings together law, urban planning and public policy students to analyze historical and contemporary trends in affordable housing, community development, land use, and housing finance using New York City as a laboratory that is both unique from, and similar to, other American cities.  The course focuses on housing/community development policy, real estate and mortgage financing, subsidies, community participation, environmental impact, and neighborhood change such as gentrification and displacement, with particular emphasis upon how issues of race, poverty, and the economic climate affect federal, state, local and community responses.  We will discuss the causes and consequences of government intervention in housing and neighborhoods, developing tools for students to determine the need for public intervention, the optimal design and financing of housing and community development programs, and how to evaluate success. 

Permission of instructors required to register. Please contact Academic Services to register.

The course is taught at the School of Law.
 


Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2011

Gerecke, S., with V. Been et al. 2011. Navigating Uncertain Waters: Mortgage Lending in the Wake of the Great Recession
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2009

Gerecke, S. 2009. Burning Down the House The Stamford Review (volume 2, 2009), pp. 12-17.
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1984

Gerecke, S. with Charles M. Haar et al. 1984. Enterprise Zones: Inner-city Panacea or Supply-Side Showpiece? Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.