The Conflict, Security, and Development Series

Co-presented by the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at NYU Law School, the Center for Global Affairs at NYU's School for Professional Studies, The Program in International Relations at NYU's GSAS, the Robert L. Bernstein Institute for Human Rights, and the Office of International Programs at NYU Wagner

Each Tuesday, the Conflict, Security, and Development Series will examine new research, discuss creative policy approaches, and highlight recent innovations in responding to the challenges of security and development in conflict and post-conflict situations. 

The Conflict, Security, and Development Series—WINDFALL: How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America’s Power

Date:
Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Location:
The Puck Building - 295 Lafayette Street, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10012

Former Washington policymaker and current Harvard professor Meghan O’Sullivan discusses her new book on the day of its release. Books will be available for purchase. 

Speaker: Meghan L. O'Sullivan author of Windfall How the New Energy Abundance Upends Global Politics and Strengthens America’s Power​​​​​


The Conflict, Security, and Development Series—Education Builds Peace, Right? The Complicated Answer from Rwanda and Beyond

Date:
Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Location:
The Puck Building - 295 Lafayette Street, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10012

When people talk about education and conflict, there are two typical approaches. The first focuses on ways in which conflict disrupts the provision of education. The second is that education can prevent conflict. Both are undoubtedly important. By focusing almost exclusively on the conviction that schooling can build peace, we have too often overlooked how schooling can do the reverse—contribute to conflict. Based on research in Rwanda and beyond, this discussion will be on the multiple complicated relationships between education, peace, and conflict, and what they suggest for those committed to conflict prevention and development.

 

Speaker: Elisabeth King

 


The Conflict, Security, and Development Series—Citizenship-stripping and Counter-terrorism Policy: Moral, Legal and Strategic Considerations

Date:
Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Location:
The Puck Building - 295 Lafayette Street, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10012

Citizenship is widely considered to be the most stable form of individual legal status. Yet, international law provides limited constraints on the state’s sovereign prerogative to denationalize (citizenship-stripping or involuntary loss of citizenship). Deprivation of nationality, as we have repeatedly seen throughout world history, is often a prelude to expulsion and exile. Over the last century, the use of formal/legal denationalization has declined steadily, and citizenship has opened up—to women, to national minorities, to long-term residents, and dual nationals. Since 9/11, however, states have increasingly deployed denationalization as a tool in combating terrorism-related national security threats. The trend seems likely to continue.

In this discussion, we will review the applicable legal standards and practical examples from several current national contexts as a basis for debating whether denationalization should be available to states as a counter-terrorism measure.

Speaker: Laura Bingham, Senior Managing Legal Officer, Equality and Inclusion, Open Society Justice Initiative


The Conflict, Security, and Development Series—Profits of Hope: The Role of Migrant Smugglers in our Modern World

Date:
Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Location:
The Puck Building - 295 Lafayette Street, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10012

As millions of men, women, and children seek passage to Europe in order to escape violent conflicts, repressive governments, and a lack of economic opportunity, their movements are enabled and actively encouraged by networks of smugglers and traffickers that amass billions of dollars by facilitating their transport. Many smugglers carry out their activities with little regard for human life. Others are revered by their clients, considered saviors who deliver them to safety and the chance for a better life. Peter Tinti, co-author of Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, Savior, will discuss the people who comprise these networks, and why efforts to combat them often do more harm than good.

Speaker: Peter Tinti is an independent journalist and Senior Research Fellow at the Global Initiative Against Transnational Organized Crime. Among other outlets, his writing, reporting, and photography has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Foreign Policy, and Vice.

His book, Migrant, Refugee, Smuggler, Savior, will be available for purchase.

 


The Conflict, Security, and Development Series—Explaining the Micro Dynamics of the Populist Cleavage in 'New Turkey'

Date:
Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Time:
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Location:
The Puck Building - 295 Lafayette Street, The Rudin Family Forum for Civic Dialogue, 2nd Floor, New York, NY 10012

Over the last decade, the literature on populism has flourished as it has sought to account for the causes, definitions, and consequences of the significant support and prolonged political success of populist leaders and parties. However, the political and emotional reception of populist performance by populist constituencies is still an under-researched subject. Based on a qualitative study that was conducted in Istanbul between October and December 2016, this talk will focus on how performative populist political style is received, reproduced, and reflected in the emotional and political frameworks of the populist constituencies.

Speaker: Evren Balta


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