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CAP-GP.3601
1.5 points

Couples with CAP-GP.3602.

CAP-GP.3602
1.5 points

Continuation of CAP-GP.3601.

CAP-GP.3890
1.5 points

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

CAP-GP.3891
1.5 points

Continuation of CAP-GP.3890.

EXEC-GP.3190
4.5 points

Restricted to students in the Executive MPA PSL Program.

This course is designed to create an “action learning” community in which students will integrate their professional experiences, and other graduate course work, with a final exploration of leadership concepts, theory and applied practice.

EXEC-GP.1194
4.5 points

Only open to students in the Global and Public Service Leader Executive MPA Programs.

HPAM-GP.2867
3 points

All health systems, in the industrialized world, grapple with problems of cost, access, equity and quality of health care; and the trade-offs among these objectives. Reforms based on promoting markets, managed competition, public contracting, improved management, and changing financial incentives are some important issues under discussion in most nations.

HPAM-GP.2242
3 points

The Wagner School Summer Institute brings together faculty and students from the United States and other parts of the world for an on-site exploration of international health policy and prospects in Geneva, Switzerland.

HPAM-GP.2848
3 points

The overall goal of this course is to develop students’ skills in the financial analysis of key strategies for today’s health care organizations.  To achieve this goal, we will (1) explore the drivers of value creation, valuation approaches, and differences in capital structures between nonprofit and for-profit healthcare providers; (2) examine horizontal consolidation among nonprofit and for-profit providers (mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, and the like), and vertical consolidation between providers and payers; and (3) consider sources of financing, including private and public e

INDEP-GP.1900
3 points

1.5-3 credits. An independent reading must be proposed to, and approved and supervised by a full-time faculty member. Professors are not required to take on any student for an independent reading and may be more inclined in cases where the student defines her or his interest in a subject fairly precisely. Students must submit a reading list and agree to specific due dates for assignments with the faculty member supervising the independent reading.

NONCR-GP.932
0 points

This non-credit, 3-session module introduces students to the basic functionalities of Microsoft Excel such as basic formulas, absolute versus relative cell reference, formatting, and time-value of money financial functions. The module is held in a computer lab and every student has a computer. It is intended for students with limited or no Excel experience, and is designed to be taken concurrently with CORE-GP 1021 (Financial Management).

NONCR-GP.906
0 points

This noncredit module focuses on those math skills that are essential to statistics, microeconomics, and financial management. Students taking quantitative courses are encouraged to take advantage of this review.

NONCR-GP.907
0 points

This short, non-credit class aims to give students an overview of the key elements of successful writing, and equip them with the tools to approach any writing assignment, from memos to emails to reports to research briefs. This class is designed to be a companion piece to other coursework, and students will be asked to bring in assignments from other courses to work on in class. Topics covered include introductions, structure and organization, paragraphs and

NONCR-GP.104
0 points

This is an interactive 90-minute introduction to writing, citing, and integrating sources in graduate essays. Although we will cover various citation methods, including MLA and Chicago, we will focus on APA Style. Students will gain practice in citing scholarly and popular sources in text and in the Works Cited page of projects and will develop skill incorporating articles into their own prose. In addition to integrating sources, this workshop is also a brief introduction to NYU library resources and services available to Wagner students.

NONCR-GP.106
0 points

Do you feel like a professional juggler as you try to achieve your goals, get everything done, and still have a life?  In this workshop, you'll learn time management tools and tips that can help you articulate your goals and maximize your time to achieve them.  It's a hands-on workshop with lots of interaction, and you'll leave with a personalized plan of attack to start you on your way to success.  Specific topics include writing your top goals and understanding what's stopping you from using your time most effectively. You also get some tips about efficient study habits.

NONCR-GP.108
0 points

Throughout this four-session workshop, students will use their experiences and education as the context for a series of career-related analyses based on the following four lenses: Issue, System, Organization, and Role. All discussions will be brought back to Composing Your Career (CYC), a framework for maximizing one’s time at Wagner based on the SEER strategy: Smart, Experienced, Engaged, and Reflective. All of this will lead to an action plan to maximize one’s time at Wagner in the pursuit of a successful public service career.
 

PADM-GP.2106
3 points

Introduction to Community Organizing is for those who could imagine running national or local advocacy organizations that make change happen or anyone who wants to understand the art of community organizing. It will provide an overview of and training in contemporary community organizing practice in the United States. This includes defining what community organizing is and identifying its value base; exploring the strategies, tactics and activities of organizing; and thinking about marketing, language and evaluation.

PADM-GP.2245
3 points

Many developing countries have been significantly reforming the scope and organization of the public sector in recent years. This course critically examines the changing structures and operations of government fiscal systems in developing countries, with particular emphasis on the growing trend to strengthen sub-national levels.

PADM-GP.2445
3 points

This course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life course—some groups experiencing poverty more so than others.

PADM-GP.2441
3 points

Reforming education policy and finance are at the center of intense debates at all levels of government, driven in part by the recognition of the central role that education plays in the economy. Education affects the productivity of the labor force, the distribution of income, economic growth, and individuals’ earnings and quality of life. This course uses economic principles to analyze K-12 education. The course begins with an examination of the demand for education, both by the private sector (particularly individuals) and the public sector.

PADM-GP.2112
3 points

This course addresses the macro and micro effects of gender in the workplace, from the complicated reasons for the lack of representation of women in senior leadership across sectors to the interpersonal dynamics of women and men working together. The landscape for business has changed dramatically over the last few decades, and with a shift towards a more global workforce, understanding the intersection of work dynamics and gender is critical.

PADM-GP.4110
1.5 points

Effective development, planning, execution and communication of special projects are critical to all types of public service organizations. Service organization, health providers and other institutions constantly pursue new initiatives – offering new services, developing creative approaches to service delivery, beginning new program components, opening new facilities, introducing new technologies – to address the demands of their constantly changing environment. Nonprofit and government organizations face similar pressures are also rely on special projects to address them.