Finance

Pathways After Default: What Happens to Distressed Mortgage Borrowers and Their Homes

Pathways After Default: What Happens to Distressed Mortgage Borrowers and Their Homes
Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics 48(2), February 2014.

Sewin Chan, Vicki Been, Andrew Haughwout and Claudia Sharygin
02/01/2014

We use a detailed dataset of seriously delinquent mortgages to examine the dynamic process of mortgage default—from initial delinquency and default to final resolution of the loan and disposition of the property. We estimate a two-stage competing risk hazard model to assess the factors associated with post-default outcomes, including whether a borrower receives a legal notice of foreclosure. In particular, we focus on a borrower’s ability to avoid a foreclosure auction by getting a modification, by refinancing the loan, or by selling the property. We find that the outcomes of the foreclosure process are significantly related to: loan characteristics including the borrower’s credit history, current loan-to-value and the presence of a junior lien; the borrower’s post-default payment behavior, including the borrower’s participation in foreclosure counseling; neighborhood characteristics such as foreclosure rates, recent house price depreciation and median income; and the borrower’s race and ethnicity.

Is Micro Too Small? Microcredit vs. SME Finance

Is Micro Too Small? Microcredit vs. SME Finance
World Development 43: 288-297. 2013.

Bauchet, Jonathan and Jonathan Morduch
12/15/2013

Microcredit and SME finance are often pitched as alternative strategies to create employment opportunities in low-income communities. So far, though, little is known about how employment patterns compare. We integrate evidence from three surveys to show that, compared to Bangladeshi microcredit customers, typical SME employees in Bangladesh have more education and professional skills, and live in households that are notably less poor. SME jobs also require long work weeks, clashing with family responsibilities. The evidence from Bangladesh rejects the idea that SME finance more efficiently creates jobs for the population currently served by microcredit.

Pension Obligation Bonds and Government Spending

Pension Obligation Bonds and Government Spending
Public Budgeting and Finance, 33(4):43-65

Thad Calabrese and Todd Ely
10/29/2013

We examine the use of pension obligation bonds (POBs) as a financing strategy to address the effects of unfunded pension liabilities on government operating budgets. POBs are publicly marketed as money-saving mechanisms that reduce pension system payments while allowing for increased spending on other government priorities. We review general POB usage and examine whether POBs altered school district spending patterns in Oregon and Indiana. Our results indicate that districts issuing POBs have not increased educational spending relative to other districts. Because POBs cost money to issue and manage, decision makers are encouraged to consider annual budgetary effects prior to issuance.

Moroccan Migrants as Unlikely Captains of Industry: Remittances, Financial Intermediation, and La Banque Centrale Populaire

Moroccan Migrants as Unlikely Captains of Industry: Remittances, Financial Intermediation, and La Banque Centrale Populaire
In S. Eckstein, ed. Immigrant Impact in their Homelands. Durham: Duke University Press.

Iskander, N.
09/06/2013

The impact that remittances – the monies that migrants send home – have on the development on migrant-sending economies is a matter of considerable debate. This essay presents the case of Morocco and its state-controlled bank, La Banque Centrale Populaire (BCP), to argue that the major determinant of remittance impact on development is the quality and breadth of financial intermediation to which migrants have access. By providing a set of financial tools that allowed migrants to deposit, save, and invest with the institution, the BCP, since 1969, simultaneously made remittances funds available the migrants for their personal expenditures and to the Moroccan government for large-scale industrial investment. However, to create financial services for migrants with an appeal broad enough to bring significant amounts of remittance liquidity into the banking sector, BCP had to engage migrants in an open and collaborative process of product design. Ultimately, this paper argues, migrants’ involvement in the design of financial products enabled them to use the banking system to redirect remittances resources to rural and semi-rural areas most migrants were from, and to amend the industrial development priorities of the Moroccan government.

Economics, First Edition.

Economics, First Edition.
McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Karlan, Dean and Jonathan Morduch
09/06/2013

Built from the ground up to focus on what matters to students in today’s high-tech, globalized world, Dean Karlan and Jonathan Morduch’s Economics represents a new generation of products, optimized for digital delivery and available with the best-in-class adaptive study resources in McGraw-Hill’s LearnSmart Advantage Suite. Engagement with real-world problems is built into the very fabric of the learning materials as students are encouraged to think about economics in efficient, innovative, and meaningful ways.

Drawing on the authors’ experiences as academic economists, teachers, and policy advisors, a familiar curriculum is combined with material from new research and applied areas such as finance, behavioral economics, and the political economy, to share with students how what they’re learning really matters. This modern approach is organized around learning objectives and matched with sound assessment tools aimed at enhancing students’ analytical and critical thinking competencies. Students and faculty will find content that breaks down barriers between what goes on in the classroom and what is going on in our nation and broader world.

By teaching the right questions to ask, Karlan and Morduch provide readers with a method for working through decisions they’ll face in life and ultimately show that economics is the common thread that enables us to understand, analyze, and solve problems in our local communities and around the world.

Financial Incentives and Fertility

Financial Incentives and Fertility
Review of Economics and Statistics, Volume 95 (Number 1), March 2013, pp. 1-20.

Dehejia, Rajeev and Alma Cohen.
03/01/2013

This paper investigates how fertility responds to financial incentives. We construct a large, individual-level panel data set of over 300,000 Israeli women during the period 1999–2005 with comprehensive information on their fertility histories, education, religious affiliation, ethnicity, and income. We exploit variation in Israel’s child subsidy program to identify the impact of changes in the price of a marginal child on fertility. We find a positive, statistically significant, and economically meaningful price effect on fertility. This positive effect is strongest for households in the lower range of the income distribution, weakens with income, and is present in all religious and ethnic subgroups. There is also a significant price effect on fertility among women who are close to the end of their lifetime fertility, suggesting that at least part of the effect that we estimate is due to a reduction in total fertility. Finally, we investigate how changes in household income affect fertility choices. Consistent with Becker (1960) and Becker and Tomes (1976), we find that the income effect is small in magnitude, and is negative at low income levels and positive at high income levels.

Beyond Foundation Funding: Revenue-Generating Strategies for Sustainable Social Change

Beyond Foundation Funding: Revenue-Generating Strategies for Sustainable Social Change
RCLA Report; February 2013

Jennifer Dodge, Amparo Hofmann-Pinilla, Angela Beard and Caitlin Murphy
02/05/2013

As social change organizations diversify their funding to be less reliant on foundations, they are finding creative ways to adapt traditional strategies and experiment with new ones. This report from RCLA and the Mertz Gilmore Foundation offers specific revenue-generation strategies and examples of nonprofits putting them into practice to offer immediate, actionable guidance for social change organizations, funders and technical assistance providers.

Balanced Budget Requirements and State Spending: A Long-Panel Study.

Balanced Budget Requirements and State Spending: A Long-Panel Study.
Public Budgeting & Finance 33(2): 1-18.

Smith, Daniel L. and Yilin Hou.
01/01/2013

This study tests the effects of balanced budget requirements on three measures of state expenditure using data on 48 states for the years 1950 to 2004. We find that the following rules are effective in constraining expenditures: 1) requiring that the governor submit a balanced budget; 2) placing controls on supplemental appropriations; and 3) prohibiting the carry-over of a deficit from one fiscal year or biennium into the next. The latter two rules exert larger individual effects than the first. All else equal, states can best improve their prospects of reigning in spending by instituting technical rules that govern budgetary outcomes, as opposed to political rules that dictate how the budget is assembled and approved. 

Employee Benefit Financing and Municipal Bankruptcy

Employee Benefit Financing and Municipal Bankruptcy
Journal of Government Financial Management 62(1): 12-19.

Ives, Martin and Thad Calabrese
01/01/2013

Five municipalities with populations over 100,000 have declared bankruptcy since 2008, as have some smaller ones, including Central Falls, RI, in 2011. The bankruptcies have unsettled citizens, current and retired employees, and creditors of the governments involved; further, the apparent increasing willingness of municipal officials to file for bankruptcy has raised concerns nationwide. Municipal bankruptcy is exceedingly rare. Only 650 US Bankruptcy Code Chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy cases were filed between 1937 and 2012; by contrast, 2009 alone saw more than 11,000 Chapter 11 corporate reorganization filings. The bankruptcy of Central Falls shows what can happen when systematic underfunding of employee benefit promises runs into a weak, declining economy. Central Falls is a relatively poor municipality. The consequences of bankruptcy can be severe for citizens, employees and creditors. As the current bankruptcy filings unfold in the courts, there is growing alarm among those concerned with government finances regarding the impact of bankruptcy on future borrowing costs and on the safety of employee benefit promises.

How Microfinance Really Works

How Microfinance Really Works
The Milken Institute Review

Morduch, Jonathan
01/01/2013

About half of the world’s adults lack bank accounts. Most of these “unbanked” are deemed too expensive to serve, or not worth the hassle created by banking regulations. But what may be good business from a banker’s perspective isn’t necessarily what’s best for society. The inequalities that persist in financial access reinforce broader inequalities in the distribution of income and wealth. This is the opening for microfinance and also its challenge. Microlending has been sold as a practical means to get capital into the hands of small-scale entrepreneurs who can then earn their way out of poverty. The idea appeals to our impulse to help people help themselves and to our conviction that bottom-up development depends on the embrace of the market. By eschewing governments and traditional charities, the sector promises to sidestep the bureaucracy and inertia that have hobbled other attempts to expand the opportunities of the poor.

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