February 13, 2013

As published in

The Atlantic

Click here for the Atlantic page

On February 13, The Atlantic and The Atlantic Cities launched Start-Up City: Miami, gathering leading entrepreneurs and tech experts from London, New York, California, Kansas City, and more at the New World Center in Miami for a day of discussions about different aspects of the city’s innovation ecosystem. In partnership with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and in association with the Creative Class Group, the inaugural program explored the emerging models of "urban tech" taking root in cities around the world.

In recent years, Miami has seen a surge in entrepreneurship and creative ventures. After a decade of rapid growth and urbanization, much work remains to be done if Miami is to become a hub for the global creative class. What short-term and long-term strategies will do the most to attract entrepreneurs and start-ups to the city?  Featuring roundtables, panels, and interviews on tech, design, start-up incubators, audience Q&A, a networking lunch and more, this daylong program gave participants a 360-degree view of how to attract tech, talent, and innovation to the Miami community. Click here for the program agenda.


Urbanism Case Study Roundtable: The Urban Tech Shift – Lessons from New York and London

Featuring Eric van der Kleij and Neil Kleiman
Moderated by Richard Florida, Senior Editor, The Atlantic

 


 

October 11, 2012

As published in
Governing

Click here for the Governing article

How 'Ideation' Can Power Innovation

The innovation delivery teams that five cities across the country have launched are part of an effort, supported by the Bloomberg Philanthropies, to produce smarter, more informed, big-picture solutions to significant policy and service-delivery challenges. At the core of their efforts is a concept known as "ideation."

In the context of local-government innovation, "ideation" means directly examining a problem in a systematic way, amassing many possible solutions culled from many places, and then probing and testing those ideas to see which are most likely to work.

This post, the fourth in a series on the topic of innovation delivery teams, offers something of a beginner's guide for cities interested in using ideation to help them set better policy; a full report on the subject can be found here.

Click here to read more.

 


 

August 27, 2012

As published in
Fast Company - Co.EXIST

 


The Dawn of Social Innovation 3.0
We’ve reached a new stage of social innovation, where bold ideas are now being turned into real-world projects.

Neil Kleiman, from NYU's Wagner School of Public Service, says social innovation has evolved twice since its creation, meaning we’re in the period he calls social innovation 3.0. The original iteration was the realization that new ideas and tactics were nesseary to solve the world’s problems. This was followed by a stage of actually developing and testing those ideas. Our current stage--perhaps the most important--involves institutionalizing those ideas, so that they take hold in businesses, governments, and organizations around the world.

Click here for the full Co.EXIST post


 

August 14, 2012

As published in
Governing

Click here for the Governing article

Kick-Starting the Flow of Ideas

In this series of columns, I have been exploring the concept of "ideation" — a fancy word for the process of developing and testing new ideas. For cities, this requires both fostering creativity and gaining different perspectives, and while that might sound simple, it can actually be quite disruptive. Idea generation and development demands that everyone involved get out of his or her comfort zone to see and discuss things afresh. There is a powerful tool for engendering this kind of mindset: competition.

Click here to read more.

 


 

July 10, 2012

As published in
Governing

Click here for the Governing article

How 'Ideation' is Growing Business in Memphis

City leaders face tremendous pressure to respond to crises quickly and decisively, and they frequently excel at doing just that. "What are we going to do about this?" or "What can we do about this?" are the sort of questions that drive policy. Too rarely, however, do city officials have the time and space to ask, "What should we do about this?"

In short, municipal policymaking is often a reactive process rather than an active one.

Click here to read more.

 


 

June 12, 2012

As published in
Governing

Click here for the Governing article

Incorporating Innovation into Local Government

Backed by $24 million in foundation funds, five cities are creating dedicated teams in their mayors' offices to look for ways to fundamentally restructure how the cities do what they do. There is much to be learned from this ambitious effort.

In an economic downturn that has left municipal budgets tight and the need for government services great, the interest in creative thinking about local problems is understandably intense. The number of Google hits on the words “government innovation” has increased in just the past two years from 38 million to 1.4 billion as leaders and line staff at every level of government look to do more with less.

Click here to read more.