Feb 10, 2011

Professors Receive MacArthur Grant to Help Study Impact of Foreclosures on Children

The MacArthur Foundation has announced support for a multi-disciplinary, cross-university set of researchers, including three from NYU Wagner, to study the enormous instability in the housing arrangements of many American families over the last decade, and the impact of this instability on children.

According to the researchers, "policymakers know surprisingly little about how such instability affects children, and therefore are hampered in their ability to craft responses." The project approved for Foundation support aims to fill these gaps and provide better guidance to federal, state, and local housing and education officials, community organizations, and elected officials about the benefits of housing stability.

The three Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service professors working on the project are:

Ingrid Gould Ellen, professor of public policy and urban planning, and faculty co-director of the Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy, a joint initiative of NYU Wagner and the School of Law.

Amy Ellen Schwartz, professor of public policy, education, and economics, and director of the Institute for Education and Social Policy at NYU. She also teaches at NYU Steinhardt.

Leanna Stiefel, professor of economics, and associate director of Institute for Education and Social Policy, who also teaches at Steinhardt.

The trio's co-PI's include:

Vicki Been, Boxer Family Professor of Law, New York University, and faculty director of the Furman Center, and the principal investigator on this project; David Figlio, professor of education and social policy at Northwestern University; Ashlyn Aiko Nelson, assistant professor at Indiana University's School of Public and Environmental Affairs; and Stephen L. Ross, professor of economics at the University of Connecticut.

The co-investigators note that, to date, some research has examined how residential moves affect children's educational outcomes, but the research has been limited by concerns that effects attributed to moves cannot be separated from those of unobserved characteristics of the families that move and of the neighborhoods to which they move.

Further, existing research does not adequately distinguish between types of housing moves: those that the family plans versus those that are more involuntary; those that involve only a change in housing versus those that take the child to a new neighborhood or school; or those that place the child in better neighborhoods or schools versus those that do not.

Using longitudinal data linking foreclosures and other kinds of housing upheavals to individual public school student records in four major markets that are suffering from unusual housing instability-New York City, and the counties of San Diego and Fresno in California and Pinellas County in Florida - Professors Ellen, Schwartz, Stiefel and their co-investigators will test the hypothesis that housing instability negatively affects students' educational outcomes.

In addition, they we will assess whether any effect that housing instability has on children differs by the child's race or the predominant race of the neighborhood in which the child lives or to which the child moves, and if so, what explains those differences.

The research grant was announced as part of a group of nine new MacArthur Foundation grants totaling $5.6 million for explorations of the role that housing plays in the long-term health and well-being of children, families, and communities.

 

What's new at NYU Wagner?

Publications

Video

  • WAGTalk: Daniel Smith, “Why Do Cities Go Bankrupt?”

    Professor Dan Smith discusses three of the biggest municipal bankruptcies in U.S. history: Detroit, Michigan; Jefferson County, Alabama; and Stockton, California.
    Finance
  • WAGTalk: Ingrid Gould Ellen, “Preserving History or Hindering Progress”

    The preservation of historic neighborhoods has been the subject of controversy in New York City and in cities around the country. Professor Ingrid Ellen sheds light on this debate.
    Urban Planning
  • WAGTalk: Jonathan Morduch, “U.S. Financial Diaries”

    The U.S. Financial Diaries project tracked the financial behaviors of 250 low-income American households. Professor Jonathan Morduch discusses how public policy and the private sector can create financial options for households working hard to get ahead.
    Poverty
  • NYU Wagner's 75th Celebration

    On June 12, 2014, NYU Wagner celebrated 75 years of public service education.
    Education
  • WAGTalk: John Billings, “Improving Care for High Cost/ High Risk Patients”

    Professor John Billings presents research that aims to identify and improve care for high cost/high risk Medicaid patients.
    Health