Jan 17, 2013

Banking the World: Empirical Foundations of Financial Inclusion - Jonathan Morduch

Jonathan Morduch, professor of public policy and economics at NYU Wagner, has co-edited a new collection about the world’s vast “unbanked” population. The book,  Banking the World: Empirical Foundations of Financial Inclusion, examines how to realize the goal of extending banking and other financial services to the estimated 2.5 billion people, just over half the adult population globally, who lack them. It. is published by The MIT Press and can be ordered here.

Morduch, a contributor to the volume, is the executive director and co-founder of the Financial Access Initiative, an inter-university research center housed at the Wagner school. The full gamut of essays explore such topics as the complexity of surveying people about their use of financial services; evidence of the impact of financial services on income; and the occasional negative effects of financial services on poor households, including disincentives to work and over-indebtedness. Along with Murdoch, the book's co-editors include Robert Cull and Asli Demirglic-Kunt.

About the Editors:

Robert Cull is a Lead Economist in the Finance and Delivery Private Sector Development Team of the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt is Director of Development Policy in the World Bank’s Development Economics Vice Presidency and Chief Economist of the Financial and Private Sector Development Network (FPD).

Asli Demirguc-Kunt is Senior Research Manager, Finance and Private Sector, in the World Bank's Development Economics Research Group. She is the coeditor of Financial Structures and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Comparison of Banks, Markets, and Development (MIT Press, 2001).

Jonathan J. Morduch is Professor of Public Policy and Economics at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. He is the coauthor of The Economics of Microfinance (MIT Press) and Portfolios of the Poor: How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day.

What's new at NYU Wagner?

Publications

Video

  • WAGTalk: Daniel Smith, “Why Do Cities Go Bankrupt?”

    Professor Dan Smith discusses three of the biggest municipal bankruptcies in U.S. history: Detroit, Michigan; Jefferson County, Alabama; and Stockton, California.
    Finance
  • WAGTalk: Ingrid Gould Ellen, “Preserving History or Hindering Progress”

    The preservation of historic neighborhoods has been the subject of controversy in New York City and in cities around the country. Professor Ingrid Ellen sheds light on this debate.
    Urban Planning
  • WAGTalk: Jonathan Morduch, “U.S. Financial Diaries”

    The U.S. Financial Diaries project tracked the financial behaviors of 250 low-income American households.
    Poverty
  • NYU Wagner's 75th Celebration

    On June 12, 2014, NYU Wagner celebrated 75 years of public service education.
    Education
  • WAGTalk: John Billings, “Improving Care for High Cost/ High Risk Patients”

    Professor John Billings presents research that aims to identify and improve care for high cost/high risk Medicaid patients.
    Health