Academics

Banking the World: Empirical Foundations of Financial Inclusion - Jonathan Morduch

Banking the World: Empirical Foundations of Financial Inclusion - Jonathan Morduch

Jonathan Morduch, professor of public policy and economics at NYU Wagner, has co-edited a new collection about the world’s vast “unbanked” population. The book, Banking the World: Empirical Foundations of Financial Inclusion, examines how to realize the goal of extending banking and other financial services to the estimated 2.5 billion people, just over half the adult population globally, who lack them. It. is published by The MIT Press and can be ordered here.

Morduch, a contributor to the volume, is the executive director and co-founder of the Financial Access Initiative, an inter-university research center housed at the Wagner school. The full gamut of essays explore such topics as the complexity of surveying people about their use of financial services; evidence of the impact of financial services on income; and the occasional negative effects of financial services on poor households, including disincentives to work and over-indebtedness. Along with Murdoch, the book's co-editors include Robert Cull and Asli Demirglic-Kunt.

About the Editors:

Robert Cull is a Lead Economist in the Finance and Delivery Private Sector Development Team of the World Bank’s Development Research Group. Asli Demirgüç-Kunt is Director of Development Policy in the World Bank’s Development Economics Vice Presidency and Chief Economist of the Financial and Private Sector Development Network (FPD).

Asli Demirguc-Kunt is Senior Research Manager, Finance and Private Sector, in the World Bank's Development Economics Research Group. She is the coeditor of Financial Structures and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Comparison of Banks, Markets, and Development (MIT Press, 2001).

Jonathan J. Morduch is Professor of Public Policy and Economics at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. He is the coauthor of The Economics of Microfinance (MIT Press) and Portfolios of the Poor: How the World's Poor Live on $2 a Day.

Bill Clinton counselor's latest assignment - teaching at Wagner

Bill Clinton counselor's latest assignment - teaching at Wagner

Politico.com's "Playbook," a roster of the latest DC news and happenings compiled by reporter Mike Allen, included the following item on January 19 about NYU Wagner's Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Administration Doug Band:

"ALUMNI NEWS: After conceiving and building the Clinton Global Initiative, Clinton counselor/consigliere/post-presidency architect Doug Band recently joined the NYU staff as an adjunct professor and will use his nearly 16 years working for the Clintons to teach a public service, policy and politics course (despite earning his master's and law degrees from Georgetown). Doug also serves on the international advisory board for Coca-Cola, and on the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Vote Vets boards, all while still running Clinton, Inc., helping heads of state around the world transition out of office, and raising his son Max, who recently turned one (and has started walking), with his wife Lily in NYC."

 

 

Capstone Event Exhibits Findings of More than 80 Student Teams

Capstone Event Exhibits Findings of More than 80 Student Teams

New messaging for the New York City Fire Department aimed at attracting minorities. A study of food supply chain vulnerabilities for the Myanmar Association for Public Policy. Research on whether a statistically significant relationship exists between political representation (Democratic or Republican) and infant mortality rates across the United States.

The much-anticipated exhibition of NYU Wagner's Capstone Program, held May 13, included 82 student teams – with 365 students in all. The teams crisply presented the summaries of their consulting work for 70 different organizations in 2013-14.  Four applied research projects were also presented. Those projects described above were just three examples of the Capstone Program's latest output.

Some 400 guests, including students, faculty, alumni, and organizational clients, attended the upbeat, findings-filled evening event at the Kimmel Center for University Life.

This year as in past years, NYU Wagner's Capstone program has provided students with a centerpiece of their graduate school education whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice in the field. Since 1995, more than 4,800 students have participated in nearly 1,110 projects for more than 750 organizations in the nonprofit, public, and private sectors, and in the city, region, and world.

 

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