Academics

Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award Goes to Two NYU Wagner Scholars

Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award Goes to Two NYU Wagner Scholars

A distinguished pair of NYU Wagner professors have been named as recipients of New York University's 2012 Martin Luther King Jr. Faculty Award.

Congratulations to Shankar Prasad, who is adjunct assistant professor of public administration, and Associate Professor Deirdre Royster, who is co-affiliated with the NYU Department of Sociology.

The faculty award recognizes University professors who exemplify the spirit of the late civil rights leader through their scholarship, research, and teaching by making a positive contribution to their students in the classroom and to the greater NYU community.

Professors Prasad and Royster and three other honorees were recognized at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Faculty Award Reception on  February 8 in Pless Hall Lounge. Prasad's research focuses on political learning within immigrant communities across the United States. Royster is the author of "Race and the Invisible Hand: How White Networks Exclude Black Men From Blue-Collar Jobs" (2003).

 

Michael Moore Film 'Sicko' Draws Attention to Prof. Victor Rodwin's Expertise on French Health Care

Michael Moore Film 'Sicko' Draws Attention to Prof. Victor Rodwin's Expertise on French Health Care

Michael Moore's current documentary "Sicko" is drawing attention to NYU Wagner Professor Victor Rodwin's extensive work on the French health care system. The French system is a complicated blend of private and public financing which, according to a Business Week article in which he is quoted, provides a model that might work in the U.S. In the New Republic, meanwhile, senior editor Jonathan Cohn turns to Prof. Rodwin for a better understanding of the French system. Rodwin's book, "Universal Health Insurance in France How Sustainable" -- a collection of essays he organized and which are written by himself and other experts -- was published earlier this year by the Embassy of France in Washington, D.C. Aimed at policymakers in the U.S. and France, the volume grew out of a health care roundtable convened at the Wagner School. Rodwin is Professor of Health Policy and Management at Wagner.

Missing: Hard Data and Analysis on Microcredit

Missing: Hard Data and Analysis on Microcredit

Microfinance's global acclaim has been fueled, in part, by anecdotes about cash-strapped micro-entrepreneurs propelled out of poverty by bits of extra cash in the form of microloans. But research by NYU Wagner's Professor of Public Policy and Economics Jonathan Morduch shows that little actually is known about the magnitude of very poor people who benefit from microloans -- or to what degree. The evidence that does exist, meanwhile, is flawed.

Professor Morduch is a leading microfinance expert, the co-author of the 2005 book "The Economics of Microfinance" (MIT Press), and lead researcher of the NYU Wagner-based Financial Access Initiative supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. On January 21, 2008, he delivered a Distinguished Lecture hosted by the Center for Analytical Finance of the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad. Entitled "Microfinance: The Next Capitalist Revolution?", the presentation focused on expanding concepts of microfinance to meet the needs of the next generation of unbanked customers. The lecture focused on consumer finance, livelihoods strategies, and the roles of the private and poverty sector.

While in India, Professor Morduch also delivered presentations at the Reserve Bank of India, the Delhi School of Economics, and the National Council on Applied Economic Research.

Professor Morduch also visited Japan in December, 2007, where he gave the keynote speech at a symposium on microfinance attended by academics, policymakers, and bankers, held at the Japan Bank for International Cooperation. He delivered talks at Kobe University, the University of Tokyo, and the Ministry of Finance.

Friday, February 1, 2008, Professor Morduch discusses his groundbreaking new paper, "How Can the Poor Afford Microfinance," at the First Annual Forum on Financial Access, hosted at New York University by the Financial Access Initiative. The conference, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., includes a student debate competition moderated by a senior writer and editor from The Economist and discussions by leading experts on microfinance and poverty. For further information, click below.

 

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