Academics

Featured Case Study: Ellen Schall and the Department of Juvenile Justice

Featured Case Study: Ellen Schall and the Department of Juvenile Justice

When Dean Ellen Schall was appointed commissioner of New York City’s Department of Juvenile Justice, she transformed the troubled agency into one that Harvard University and the Ford Foundation selected to win their prestigious Innovations Award. This iconic case study is featured on Electronic Hallway at the University of Washington Evans School of Public Affairs

FELPS Hosts NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott

FELPS Hosts NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott

NYC Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott addresses NYU Wagner's Fellowship for Emerging Public Service Leaders on April 27, 2011.

Just three weeks into his role as head of the nation's largest public school system, New York City Schools Chancellor Dennis Walcott spoke with NYU Wagner's Fellowship for Emerging Leaders in Public Service (FELPS) on April 27.

He discussed his career path, including founding a youth mentorship program, heading the National Urban League, and serving as Deputy Mayor of Education and Community Development. Chancellor Walcott also talked about leadership lessons he has learned from these experiences, including the importance of recognizing mentorship moments, the growth that comes from hiring people who will challenge you, and strategies for maintaining work-family balance in public service careers.

Financial Management

Advanced Professional Certificate in Health Finance

This graduate-level certificate offers knowledge and skills for financial managers in healthcare organizations. This certificate will allow you to conduct financial analysis, understand issues of budgeting, cost determination, pricing and rate setting in a healthcare environment. It also provides a solid understanding of the economic principles in the context of the field of health care.

Students must complete 15 credits to obtain this Certificate (courses are 3 credits unless noted).

Required Courses:

Students complete the following courses (12 credits):

  • CORE-GP 1021 Financial Management for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Organizations
  • HPAM-GP 4830 Health Economics: Principles (1.5 credits)
  • HPAM-GP 4831 Health Economics: Topics in Domestic Health Policy (1.5 credits) or HPAM-GP 4832 Health Economics: Topics in International Health Policy
  • HPAM-GP 4840 Financial Management for Health Care Organizations I: Financial Management and Budgeting (1.5 credits)
  • HPAM-GP 4841 Financial Management for Health Care Organizations II: Capital Financing and Advanced Issues (1.5 credits)
  • HPAM-GP 2845 Advanced Health Care Payment Systems

Students must also complete one course (3 credits) from the following:

PREREQUISITE COURSES:

Students must waive the following courses if they are prerequisites to any of the above elective courses a student wishes to take toward the certificate. If a student is unable to waive a course below, they must take it in addition to the 12 credits required for the certificate.

  • CORE-GP 1018 Microeconomics for Public Management, Planning, and Policy Analysis
  • CORE-GP 1011 Statistical Methods for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Management

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Financial Management and Public Finance

Advanced Professional Certificate in Financial Management and Public Finance

This graduate-level certificate is designed for students with, or aspiring towards, a career in finance in the nonprofit and public sectors.

The curriculum exposes students to a broad array of analytical tools, including economics, budgeting, accounting, capital financing, investment management, debt management and financial statement analysis.

Students must complete 12 credits to obtain this Certificate (courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted).

Required Courses:

Students must complete or waive the following course:

  • CORE-GP 1021 Financial Management for Public, Non profit, and Health Organizations

Electives:

Students must choose electives for the certificate from the following list of courses:

Prerequisite Courses:

Students must waive the following courses if they are prerequisites to any of the above elective courses a student wishes to take toward the certificate. If students are unable to waive the course(s), only one course from the list below may count toward the certificate and other courses would need to be completed in addition to the certificate.

  • CORE-GP 1018 Microeconomics for Public Management, Planning, and Policy Analysis 
  • CORE-GP 1011 Statistical Methods for Public, Nonprofit, and Health Management

 

For Former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Whirlwind Day at Wagner

For Former UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Whirlwind Day at Wagner

Gordon Brown (r.) enjoys light-hearted moment at Henry Hart Rice Forum with Mitchell Moss.

Gordon Brown, the British Labour Party leader who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from June 2007 to May 2010, and is a current Member of Parliament, spent an engaging day at NYU Wagner on April 11 with groups of students, faculty, alumni, staff, and the dean, Ellen Schall. In the evening, he spoke to more than 150 friends of the public-service graduate school as the guest of the Henry Hart Rice Forum moderated by Mitchell Moss, Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy and Planning at Wagner.

The Right Honourable Mr. Brown projected optimism about globalization. He said vast increases in producers and consumers in fast-developing countries such as China, India, Indonesia and Brazil will benefit the West, as long as the U.S. and Europe invest heavily in science, technology and education and keep the doors of global trade open.

In this way, Mr. Brown argued, the West can ensure it will profit and gain new sources of employment from globalization -- and ease the understandable anxiety so rife today about economic change.

"For the first time last year, in almost 200 years, Europe and America are being out-produced, out manufactured, and out-invested by the rest of the world," he said. "...It makes people insecure; it makes people feel, ‘Are we witnessing the decline of the West?...And then people feel insecure about their jobs."

It is this economic "sea change," which surpasses even that of the Industrial Revolution, that holds the seeds of opportunity for a more balanced global economy, according to the former prime minister.

"The people who are producing goods in China, India, and elsewhere - they don't want just to be workers producing goods; they want to be consumers too," he said.

"They want to enjoy some of benefit of the goods that come with a higher standard of living. They want to be part of the industrial society as middle class consumers of the future," and they want to have "houses, electrical goods, better clothes, higher quality food, health care, and education."

"There is a huge opportunity for us in what is about to happen, because we in America and Europe can be the people who are equipped to sell goods and services that are sold in the rest of the world," added Mr. Brown.

Mr. Brown, who has a PhD in History from the University of Edinburg, was introduced by Dean Schall and queried by Professor Moss about his youthful influences (mainly his parents and his school teachers), rapport with U.S. presidents (from Clinton to Bush to Obama), and Scotland's historical impact on the American experiment.

The event was held at the Kimmel Center of New York University. Mr. Brown is the university's inaugural Distinguished Global Leader in Residence.

In his remarks, the former prime minister warned against a "race to the bottom" that will occur if countries are permitted to attract business via deregulation. What is required, he stated, is the development and maintenance of consistent international standards for investment.

Fielding a question from a Wagner student about the environmental impact of burgeoning consumer economies, he said that worldwide treaties, such as the one attempted but not enacted at the recent Copenhagen Climate Summit, are clearly merited .

Foreign Policy Magazine Names Prof. Beth Noveck on Its List of "Top Global Thinkers"

Foreign Policy Magazine Names Prof. Beth Noveck on Its List of "Top Global Thinkers"

NYU Wagner Visiting Professor Beth Noveck is featured in the December issue of Foreign Policy magazine as one of the “Top 100 Global Thinkers 2012,” and joins five others at New York University also recognized on the magazine's list -- including: Danah Boyd of Steinhardt, Chen Guangcheng of the School of Law, and, from Stern, Jonathan Haidt, Paul Romer, and Nouriel Roubini.

Professor Noveck’s book, Wiki Government: How Technology Can Make Government Better, Democracy Stronger, and Citizens More Powerful, has been translated into Russian, Arabic and Chinese. According to the Foreign Policy profile: “Open government isn't built in a day, or one presidential term, for that matter. But if the initiatives she [Noveck] has set in motion – from the National Archives dashboard for citizen archivists to the Department of Health and Human Services website for comparing insurance options –are any indication, Noveck has arguably done more than anyone to lay the foundations for a Washington that feels less like a cloistered village and more like an online public square.”

Professor Noveck served in the White House as the first U.S. Deputy Chief Technology Officer and as founder and director of the White House Open Government Initiative (2009-11). She has served as an advisor to UK Prime Minister David Cameron on how technology can better employ technology in the public sector. She also served on the 2008 Obama-Biden transition team and was a volunteer advisor to the Obama for America campaign on issues of technology, innovation, and government reform.  She focuses her scholarship, activism, and teaching on the future of democracy in the 21st century. Specifically, her work addresses how we can use technology to create more open and collaborative government. With a grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, she is collaborating with colleagues to create a research network on the impact of technology on democratic institutions.

She will be a featured guest at a Foreign Policy gala on November 29 in Washington, D.C.

Former British Prime Minister Discusses Globalization in Special Lecture

Former British Prime Minister Discusses Globalization in Special Lecture

The NYU Office of the President welcomed NYU Wagner, Stern, and CAS students to a special lecture with The Right Honourable Gordon Brown MP, former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, on September 22 at the Kaufman Management Center at NYU Stern. Mr. Brown led a discussion on developments in globalization.

During his talk, Mr. Brown addressed issues relating to globalization, with a focus on fledgling political movements arrayed against it. He started with the growing tide of secessionist sentiments that have manifested themselves in such countries as Scotland, Belgium, Spain, and Italy. Mr. Brown, who is a native of Scotland, took questions regarding Scotland’s recent vote not to secede from the U.K., and stated that such reactionary responses as xenophobia and protectionism are counterproductive to the pursuit of the global solutions.  

Mr. Brown then emphasized the importance of global cooperation; especially in an era when individual governments are not able to tackle today’s global concerns alone. As an example, he pointed to the UN Climate Change Conference of 2009. He argued that this was the kind of multi-lateral summit needed to address global problems, even though several issues emerged, such as reporting and enforcement challenges, that eventually ensured the conference’s unsuccessful outcome.

He also discussed the global economic recession of 2008, noting that many European countries initially believed the financial crisis would only affect the United States. However, as countries throughout Europe began having similar economic collapses, the realization of an inter-connected economy quickly emerged. This led to another global and multi-lateral approach as the G20 was created to address these economic issues. Unfortunately, Mr. Brown pointed out, global cooperation faded later that year and these types of economic calamities were soon labeled as a Greek crisis or an Ireland crisis.

The former prime minister closed by stating that without serious global leadership and multi-lateral cooperation, perennial crises such as child trafficking, global poverty, and global epidemics will continue to endanger our future. He emphasized that it is imperative that we reform our global institutions, inform public opinion on the positives of globalization, and encourage political leaders to focus on important issues through a global, not a national lens. Only then, he said, will we begin to see true positive change for global challenges.

Author: Jayson W. Browder (Global Executive MPA, 2015), is an Air Force and Iraq Veteran and U.S. Fulbright Scholar (Turkey)

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