Anne Marie Brady

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Service

Dr. Anne Marie E. Brady is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Service of NYU's Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and an expert on individual rights and responsibilities to welfare in Germany, Britain, and the United States. Her academic research has drawn primarily upon qualitative methods. Her dissertation work explored the role of active labor market policies in assisting Unemployment Benefit II recipients (the long-term unemployed) integrate into the regular labor market under Germany’s Hartz IV welfare reforms.

Dr. Brady has also investigated people’s everyday experiences of poverty and social exclusion through work she has done with the Centre for the Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) and LSE Housing and Communities at the London School of Economics (LSE). In addition, she has worked in Washington, D.C. analyzing U.S. social housing policies (Section 8, Section 202, LIHTC) and is currently researching the effect targeted support interventions have on increasing access to and success in higher education for foster care youth at the City University of New York (CUNY).

Dr. Brady holds a B.A. in History and German from Creighton University, an M.A. in Medieval History from Fordham University, an M.Sc. in Social Policy and Planning and a Ph.D. in Social Policy Research from the London School of Economics (LSE). 

This course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life course—some groups experiencing poverty more so than others. This course will discuss the role of labor markets, family structure and social organization in shaping poverty. And finally, it will explore how social policies seek to ameliorate poverty and other forms of social disadvantage throughout the life course. But when thinking about how ‘successful’ social policies are at alleviating poverty, this course will demonstrate that ‘success’ is actually influenced by the conceptions of poverty adopted by policymakers in the first place.

Download Syllabus

This course examines the nature and extent of poverty primarily in the U.S. but with a comparative perspective (developed countries in Europe). To start, this course will focus on how poverty is defined and measured. It will proceed to explore how conceptions of poverty are socially constructed and historically bounded; examine what the causes and consequences of poverty are and discuss how these are complex and interwoven; and show how people can experience poverty at different points in their life course—some groups experiencing poverty more so than others. This course will discuss the role of labor markets, family structure and social organization in shaping poverty. And finally, it will explore how social policies seek to ameliorate poverty and other forms of social disadvantage throughout the life course. But when thinking about how ‘successful’ social policies are at alleviating poverty, this course will demonstrate that ‘success’ is actually influenced by the conceptions of poverty adopted by policymakers in the first place.

Download Syllabus