Jacob Victory

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Health Policy and Management

Jacob Victory is currently the Senior Vice President of Strategy, Product and Member at the Health Republic Insurance of New York, the largest Consumer Oriented and Operated Plan (COOP) health plan in the nation, with over 213,000 members, and the largest health plan on the New York State of Health (the Exchange). Jacob is responsible for market research and strategy; product development and management; member experience; and operational, policy and implementation. Prior to joining Health Republic, Jacob was Vice President of Medical Operations and Program Development for CenterLight Healthcare, the $850 million subsidiary of CenterLight Health System that is comprised of four managed long term care health plans focused on the medically complex Medicare, Medicaid and Dually Eligible populations. Jacob reported to the Chief Medical Officer and was responsible for the development, operations and strategic planning of clinical programs that included behavioral health, palliative care, transitional care, social work services, innovative care models including the integration of nurse practitioners into outpatient primary care settings/diagnostic and treatment settings, pastoral care and volunteers services, clinical and risk adjustment assessment units, along with leading corporate clinical initiatives related to revenue maximization.

Prior to joining CenterLight Healthcare, Jacob held multiple roles at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York (VNSNY), the nation’s largest not-for-profit home health care organization. He was most currently the Vice President of Performance Management Projects, focusing on projects related to implementing health care reform initiatives focused on new care delivery models and on organization-wide initiatives tasked with enhancing operational efficiencies to improve quality, processes and cost-structures. Jacob also served as the Vice President of VNSNY Children and Family Services, the umbrella for the eight maternal and pediatric programs within VNSNY that annually served 10,000 medically and socio-economically compromised children and families. Jacob has also served as the Director of Operational Performance Management, Director of Operations for Rehabilitation Services and Project Manager to the President and CEO, all while at VNSNY. Prior to joining VNSNY, Jacob held various positions within the strategic planning departments at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital and Cabrini Medical Center and completed his management residencies at the Weill-Cornell Physician Organization and Clara Maass Medical Center.

Jacob has recently had three health management case studies published in a graduate school textbook: Health Management Services: Cases, Readings and Commentary. In 2009, Jacob completed a year-long leadership fellowship at the Coro Leadership Center, focusing on public policy and, in particular, New York City’s public school system’s initiative on education reform.  Jacob is currently a Trustee of the Helene Fuld College of Nursing, an Advisory Board member of the a.i.r. harlem, and the former Chairman of the Board of Danza Espana/American Spanish Dance Theater.  An abstract painter, Jacob has had two SoHo art exhibitions.  Jacob holds a BA in English Literature, with honors, from Rutgers University and an MPA in Health Policy and Management from the NYU-Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, where he is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor.   

Required for MPA Health students. This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with basic concepts and ideas concerning the distribution of health and illness in society, the organization of the health care system, and the relationship of one to the other. We begin by considering the evolution of the U.S. health care system and of health policy. We then present an international perspective on the U.S. health care system with an emphasis on the Affordable Care Act, alternative government roles, current challenges and the future of the health care system. In the second part of the course, we explore divergent perspectives for analyzing health and health care: clinical, epidemiological, economic, sociological/cultural and public health. In the third part, we focus on, selected issues in HPAM: the challenge of mental health, variations in medical practice and the quality of care, health care rationing and access to care. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of how practitioners in the field of HPAM should respond to the growing awareness of the social determinants of health and the growth of the medical-industrial complex for HPAM.

Class readings cover major topics in the study of health and health care delivery: the organization and financing of health care systems; cost and access to health care; health policy challenges and the Affordable Care Act; the roles of government in health systems and policy; the epidemiology of health and medical care, economic and ethical issues related to health care rationing, the social determinants of health. Along with covering these subjects, we emphasize the value of understanding diverse disciplinary perspectives, the challenges of meeting the varied (and often conflicting) needs and motivations of health care system stakeholders, and the ways in which the United States health care system differs from those of other wealthy nations.

Download Syllabus

Required for MPA Health students. This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with basic concepts and ideas concerning the distribution of health and illness in society, the organization of the health care system, and the relationship of one to the other. We begin by considering the evolution of the U.S. health care system and of health policy. We then present an international perspective on the U.S. health care system with an emphasis on the Affordable Care Act, alternative government roles, current challenges and the future of the health care system. In the second part of the course, we explore divergent perspectives for analyzing health and health care: clinical, epidemiological, economic, sociological/cultural and public health. In the third part, we focus on, selected issues in HPAM: the challenge of mental health, variations in medical practice and the quality of care, health care rationing and access to care. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of how practitioners in the field of HPAM should respond to the growing awareness of the social determinants of health and the growth of the medical-industrial complex for HPAM.

Class readings cover major topics in the study of health and health care delivery: the organization and financing of health care systems; cost and access to health care; health policy challenges and the Affordable Care Act; the roles of government in health systems and policy; the epidemiology of health and medical care, economic and ethical issues related to health care rationing, the social determinants of health. Along with covering these subjects, we emphasize the value of understanding diverse disciplinary perspectives, the challenges of meeting the varied (and often conflicting) needs and motivations of health care system stakeholders, and the ways in which the United States health care system differs from those of other wealthy nations.

Download Syllabus

Required for MPA Health students. This introductory course is designed to familiarize students with basic concepts and ideas concerning the distribution of health and illness in society, the organization of the health care system, and the relationship of one to the other. We begin by considering the evolution of the U.S. health care system and of health policy. We then present an international perspective on the U.S. health care system with an emphasis on the Affordable Care Act, alternative government roles, current challenges and the future of the health care system. In the second part of the course, we explore divergent perspectives for analyzing health and health care: clinical, epidemiological, economic, sociological/cultural and public health. In the third part, we focus on, selected issues in HPAM: the challenge of mental health, variations in medical practice and the quality of care, health care rationing and access to care. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of how practitioners in the field of HPAM should respond to the growing awareness of the social determinants of health and the growth of the medical-industrial complex for HPAM.

Class readings cover major topics in the study of health and health care delivery: the organization and financing of health care systems; cost and access to health care; health policy challenges and the Affordable Care Act; the roles of government in health systems and policy; the epidemiology of health and medical care, economic and ethical issues related to health care rationing, the social determinants of health. Along with covering these subjects, we emphasize the value of understanding diverse disciplinary perspectives, the challenges of meeting the varied (and often conflicting) needs and motivations of health care system stakeholders, and the ways in which the United States health care system differs from those of other wealthy nations.

Download Syllabus