Molly Schultz Hafid

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Public Service

Molly Schultz Hafid is the Assistant Director of the Unitarian Universalist Veatch Program at Shelter Rock, where she is responsible for the Democratic Participation, Civil and Constitutional Rights and Community Organizing program areas. Prior to the Veatch Program, she worked as the Director of Grantmaking Programs at a progressive social justice foundation committed to combating the root causes of economic and social injustice. She managed a portfolio that included grantmaking to community organizing and advocacy groups, redevelopment and recovery grants in the Gulf Coast region (following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita), the development of the Seasons Fund for Social Transformation, and management of the individual donor-advised fund program. Schultz Hafid has also worked as a Program Manager of Strategic Partnerships at the Jewish Funders Network and as the Acting Deputy Director of the North Star Fund in New York City.

Schultz Hafid is also Part-Time Faculty at The New School teaching graduate courses in grantmaking and fundraising for the Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy; and, Adjunct Faculty at the School of Visual Arts teaching undergraduate visual arts students about globalization and social movements.  She serves as an Expert Reviewer for the Corporation for National and Community Service Social Innovation Fund (SIF) and a Peer Reviewer for the journal Foundation Review.  Schultz Hafid has written and presented extensively on social justice grantmaking and on her work to improve the use of financial due diligence and streamline the grantmaking process.  She serves on the Board of Directors for the Neighborhood Funders Group, Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees, and the National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy. 

Schultz Hafid has an undergraduate degree in Anthropology and Literature from Antioch College in Ohio and a Masters of Public Administration with a specialization in International Nonprofit Management from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University.  She also has an executive education certificate in Nonprofit Financial Sustainability from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School.  Her ongoing research interest is the role of charitable capital flows in building civil society in the Middle East and North Africa. Schultz Hafid was a recipient of a research fellowship with the John D. Gerhardt Center on Philanthropy and Civic Engagement at the American University in Cairo and has published on the subject of emerging trends in Social Justice Philanthropy in Egypt and the broader MENA region.

This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy.  Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.  By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.

Coursework will include case studies, individual foundation research, and opportunities for students to become familiar with the research by and about the philanthropic sector.  Classes will combine lectures, guest speakers, and class debates to understand and analyze different approaches to grantmaking, identify how they shape foundation priorities, and learn how to effectively position their work within the philanthropic sector.

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This course focuses on the three sets of key questions: (1) mission and vision ("What areas or activities should we be working in?"); (2) strategy and operations ("How can we perform effectively in this area?"); and (3) leadership (“What leadership skills are needed to develop and implement strategies effectively?”).  We will cover both strategy formulation ("What should our strategy be?") and strategy implementation ("What do we need to do to make this strategy work?"). 

All organizations – government agencies as well as non-profit or private companies with a public purpose – face substantial challenges that demand strategic responses, often in uncertain economic, social, or political contexts.  To deal effectively with these challenges, managers need knowledge and skills in strategic management and leadership:  setting and aligning goals with the organization’s mission; handling complex trade-offs between demand for services and resource constraints; defining measures of success; motivating staff and other stakeholders; developing relationships with relevant groups; dealing with crises and environments in transition; and leading organizational change.  In short, the course emphasizes the multiple, related requirements of the leader/manager's job: analysis, creativity, and action.

Download Syllabus

This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy.  Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.  By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.

Coursework will include case studies, individual foundation research, and opportunities for students to become familiar with the research by and about the philanthropic sector.  Classes will combine lectures, guest speakers, and class debates to understand and analyze different approaches to grantmaking, identify how they shape foundation priorities, and learn how to effectively position their work within the philanthropic sector.

Download Syllabus

This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy.  Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.  By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.

Coursework will include case studies, individual foundation research, and opportunities for students to become familiar with the research by and about the philanthropic sector.  Classes will combine lectures, guest speakers, and class debates to understand and analyze different approaches to grantmaking, identify how they shape foundation priorities, and learn how to effectively position their work within the philanthropic sector.

Download Syllabus

This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy.  Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.  By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.

Coursework will include case studies, individual foundation research, and opportunities for students to become familiar with the research by and about the philanthropic sector.  Classes will combine lectures, guest speakers, and class debates to understand and analyze different approaches to grantmaking, identify how they shape foundation priorities, and learn how to effectively position their work within the philanthropic sector.

Download Syllabus

This course will explore the fault lines within the field of philanthropy and prepare students to effectively leverage resources for their organizations. The course will examine different approaches to grantmaking including: social entrepreneurship, effective altruism, venture philanthropy, social justice grantmaking, and strategic philanthropy.  Students will learn the differences across these conceptual frameworks and understand how they influence the ways in which foundations establish goals, develop strategies, evaluate grantees, and determine grant awards.  By exploring both the conceptual and pragmatic dimensions of across grantmaking frameworks, students will understand the tensions and debates within the philanthropic sector and be well prepared to identify those foundations most likely to support their work.

Coursework will include case studies, individual foundation research, and opportunities for students to become familiar with the research by and about the philanthropic sector.  Classes will combine lectures, guest speakers, and class debates to understand and analyze different approaches to grantmaking, identify how they shape foundation priorities, and learn how to effectively position their work within the philanthropic sector.

Download Syllabus