Anthony Kovner

Anthony Kovner
Professor of Public and Health Management

Anthony R. Kovner, Professor of Public and Health Management, is an organizational theorist by training. His research interests include health services management and governance. He has been a senior manager in two hospitals, a nursing home, a group practice, and a neighborhood health center, as well as a senior health care consultant for a large industrial union. Professor Kovner has written numerous articles on health services management, evidence-based management, and hospital governance. His books include: Health Care Management in Mind: Eight Careers (Springer, 2000) and Health Care Delivery in the United States 10th edition, coeditor, (Springer 2011). He is currently the director of the executive MPA program for nurse leaders at Wagner. Professor Kovner has served as a consultant to the New York Presbyterian Hospital & Health Care System, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Montefiore Medical Center, and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, among others. He was a board member of the Lutheran Medical Center for 25 years and was the former director for over 15 years of NYU/Wagner's program of health policy and management. Kovner was awarded the Filerman Prize for Educational Leadership in 1999 by Association of Programs in Health Administration. Professor Kovner received his Ph.D. in public administration from the University of Pittsburgh, and his MPA from Cornell University.

Semester Course
Fall 2014 UPADM-GP.231.001 Managing Innovation in Health Care

This course is aimed at students intending to work as clinicians or as managers in the health care industry.  In this course, students will: understand how health care organizations operate, the contexts they face; the opportunities and constraints facing those who wish to innovate in health care organizations; how healthcare organizations are governed and managed; examine successful innovations implemented in healthcare organizations; understand how to motivate workforce in healthcare organizations; and improve writing, presenting, and listening skills.


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Fall 2014 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2014 HPAM-GP.4847.001 Caring Dilemmas: Learning from Narrative

This course uses novels, plays and films to help health policy and management students analyze the dilemmas that doctors, nurses, managers and caregivers face in caring for the vulnerable. Students learn how they and others think and feel about ways of responding to these dilemmas in best practice.

Enrollment is strictly limited to 18 students.


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Spring 2013 HPAM-GP.4833.001 Health Care Management I: Control and Organizational Design

This is a 2-credit course intended for graduate students and is designed to study how to manage in and lead health care organizations (HCOs). Topics covered will include: the use of evidence-based management in health care, how health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations, how performance control systems work in health care organizations, management of acute and chronic care delivery systems, and models of accountable health care systems.


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Spring 2013 PADM-GP.4113.001 Evidence-Based Management

This is a seven week course on evidence-informed decision-making leading to the design of a capstone proposal or similar project. The student will learn: to frame management challenges as answerable questions; gather evidence through literature review, search for best practice and design of management research; and, develop a compelling argument for a capstone or similar management project.

There are no pre-requisites. The school-wide core is highly recommended, as it is anticipated that most students will register for the course during the semester prior to taking the Capstone.


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Fall 2012 HPAM-GP.4847.001 Caring Dilemmas: Learning from Narrative

This course uses novels, plays and films to help health policy and management students analyze the dilemmas that doctors, nurses, managers and caregivers face in caring for the vulnerable. Students learn how they and others think and feel about ways of responding to these dilemmas in best practice.

Enrollment is strictly limited to 18 students.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2012 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2012 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2011 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 HPAM-GP.4833.001 Health Care Management I: Control and Organizational Design

This is a 2-credit course intended for graduate students and is designed to study how to manage in and lead health care organizations (HCOs). Topics covered will include: the use of evidence-based management in health care, how health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations, how performance control systems work in health care organizations, management of acute and chronic care delivery systems, and models of accountable health care systems.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 HPAM-GP.4834.001 Health Care Management II: Adaptation and the Professional Manager

This is a 2-credit course intended for graduate students and is designed to study how to manage in and lead health care organizations (HCOs). Topics covered will include: strategic planning and marketing in HCOs, particularly in non-profit organizations, how HCOs assess and adapt to change, ethical issues in HCO's, and constraints/opportunities for managerial careers in HCOs.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2010 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 HPAM-GP.1833.001 Health Services Management
Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This course is intended for graduate students and is about learning how to manage in health care organizations (HCOs).

At the end of this course, students will understand:
• Use of evidence-based management in health care.
• How health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations.
• How health care organizations assess and adapt to change.
• How performance control systems work in HCOs.
• Constraints/opportunities in shaping organizational performance and managerial careers.

Students will also learn to work better with others on team projects, and improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills.
Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 CAP-GP.3891.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders II

Continuation of CAP-GP.3890.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 CAP-GP.3891.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders II

Continuation of CAP-GP.3890.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


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Fall 2009 UPADM-GP.0211.001 Getting Things Done: Implementation in Health Policy and Management
A course for students who wish to drive initiatives for improving health care by applying proven management techniques. Assignments will include design of a “contract” to get something done and a work plan to accomplish a project which the student would lead in accomplishing. Also required is a book report on pertinent readings, an oral presentation of the proposed project, and a final 2,000-word paper. The course will begin with a discussion of evidence-based management, which is the primary method used in developing the design of the contract. Guest speakers will discuss projects they were able to accomplish and projects which failed, giving the reasons why. A guest speaker from the library will review search strategy for the literature and the professor will discuss how to learn about best practice. This is intended to be a small seminar with class enrollment limited to 15.
Download Syllabus
Fall 2009 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 HPAM-GP.1833.001 Health Services Management
Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This course is intended for graduate students and is about learning how to manage in health care organizations (HCOs).

At the end of this course, students will understand:
• Use of evidence-based management in health care.
• How health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations.
• How health care organizations assess and adapt to change.
• How performance control systems work in HCOs.
• Constraints/opportunities in shaping organizational performance and managerial careers.

Students will also learn to work better with others on team projects, and improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills.
Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 CAP-GP.3890.001 Capstone: Advanced Projects for Healthcare Leaders I

Couples with CAP-GP.3891.

As part of the core curriculum of the NYU Wagner Masters program, Capstone teams spend an academic year addressing challenges and identifying opportunities for a client organization or conducting research on a pressing social question. Wagner's Capstone program provides students with a centerpiece of their graduate experience whereby they are able to experience first-hand turning the theory of their studies into practice under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Projects require students to get up-to-speed quickly on a specific content or issue area; enhance key process skills including project management and teamwork; and develop competency in gathering, analyzing, and reporting out on data. Capstone requires students to interweave their learning in all these areas, and to do so in real time, in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment.


Download Syllabus
Fall 2008 HPAM-GP.1833.001 Health Services Management
Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This course is intended for graduate students and is about learning how to manage in health care organizations (HCOs).

At the end of this course, students will understand:
• Use of evidence-based management in health care.
• How health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations.
• How health care organizations assess and adapt to change.
• How performance control systems work in HCOs.
• Constraints/opportunities in shaping organizational performance and managerial careers.

Students will also learn to work better with others on team projects, and improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills.
Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 PADM-GP.4135.001 Nonprofit Governance

This course is intended for graduate students interested in learning about the governance of nonprofit organizations and the role of nonprofit boards.

The role of the nonprofit board member has always been significant, but never as demanding as it is today.  With nonprofits addressing significant community needs with constricting financial resources, board members must provide both strategic leadership and responsible stewardship, with a focus on financial sustainability.  This course will examine the role of the board and will explore common questions about the roles of board members: Are board members essentially advocates and fundraisers?  Do they direct the organization to the extent staff is unable? Or is the board’s role primarily defined by their need to resolve a crisis situation for the nonprofit organization?

By the end of this course, students will understand how nonprofits are governed and some of the current issues in nonprofit governance. Topics covered in classroom lecture, discussion and applied case studies will include the structure, functions, recruitment and composition of nonprofit boards; the relation of the board to management; the board’s role in both compliance and strategic planning; and improving board performance and accountability.

At the end of the course, learners will understand:
1. Board structure, functions and composition.
2. The relationship of the board to organizational/CEO performance.
3. Fiduciary, strategic, and generative governance.
4. Common problems and issues in non-profit governance, from both short and long term perspectives.
5. How to assess interventions to improve board performance.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 HPAM-GP.1833.001 Health Services Management
Required for M.P.A. (health) students.

This course is intended for graduate students and is about learning how to manage in health care organizations (HCOs).

At the end of this course, students will understand:
• Use of evidence-based management in health care.
• How health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations.
• How health care organizations assess and adapt to change.
• How performance control systems work in HCOs.
• Constraints/opportunities in shaping organizational performance and managerial careers.

Students will also learn to work better with others on team projects, and improve their critical thinking and written and oral communication skills.
Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2014

Kovner, A. R. 2014. Evidence-Based Management: Implications for Nonprofit Organizations Nonprofit Management and Leadership, Spring 2014, 24(3): 417–424. doi: 10.1002/nml.21097
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Abstract

The article reviews evidence-based management and its implications for practice and teaching. My focus is on strategic decision making in nonprofit organizations. Evidence-based management is a process that includes framing the question, finding evidence, assuring accuracy, applicability, and actionability of evidence until the evidence is the best available.

2012

Friedman, Leonard and Anthony R. Kovner (eds.) 2012. 101 Careers in Healthcare Management Springer Publishing Company
Abstract

Careers in health administration continue to grow despite an overall downturn in the economy. This is a field that offers tremendous job opportunities across the spectrum of healthcare delivery and payment organizations. 101 Careers in Healthcare Management is the only comprehensive guide to careers in health administration, ranging from entry-level management positions to the most senior executive opportunities. The guide clearly explains the responsibilities and duties of each of these careers and how they differ from other management jobs. It describes the integral role of healthcare administrators in creating and sustaining the systems that allow healthcare clinicians to do their best work.

The book covers educational requirements, opportunities, traditional and nontraditional career pathways, and helps students assess whether they are temperamentally and intellectually suited to a career in healthcare management. Based on the most current data from the U.S. Department of Labor and professional societies in healthcare management, the guide describes careers in 14 different healthcare and related settings. These include long-term care, physician practices, commercial insurance, consulting firms, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, information technology, and biotechnology. Additionally, the book offers numerous interviews with health administrators, from those in entry-level positions to CEOs, to more vividly portray potential careers.

2010

Sandman, D., & Kovner, A. 2010. A Philanthropy Tackles Growth In Health Costs At The State Level Health Affairs, 29, no. 7 (2010): 1411-1414 
Abstract

Slowing the rate of growth of health spending is as critical a goal at the state level as it is at the national level. Philanthropy can hardly address this issue alone, yet it has an obligation to take on big and seemingly intractable problems. The New York State Health Foundation is committed to stimulating innovative and replicable approaches to bending the cost curve.

This article describes how the foundation recently awarded six grants to support efforts related to payment reform, hospital re-admissions, medical malpractice reform, palliative care, and the quantification of other cost containment approaches that could be pursued atthe state level.

2009

Kovner, A.R. 2009. Managing Relationships: Take Care of Your Nurses In Health Services Management: Cases, Readings, and Commentary, Ninth Edition. Kovner, A., A. McAlearney, D. Neuhauser, eds.

Kovner, A.R 2009. Orthopedic Unit In Health Services Management: Cases, Readings, and Commentary, Ninth Edition. Kovner, A., A. McAlearney, D. Neuhauser, eds.

Kovner, A.R., Fine, D.R. & D'Aquila, R. 2009. Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare Chicago:  Health Administration Press,
Abstract

Too often in the fast-moving healthcare field, decision makers rely primarily on what has worked before. Evidence-Based Management in Healthcare explains how healthcare leaders can move from making educated guesses to using the best available information to make decisions.

Learn what evidence-based management (EB management) is and how it can focus thinking and clarify the issues surrounding a decision. The book provides a straightforward process for asking the right questions, gathering supporting information from various sources, evaluating the information, and applying it to solve management challenges.

Numerous real-life examples illustrate how the EB management approach is used in a variety of situations, from inpatient bed planning to operating room scheduling to leadership development. These examples also demonstrate the potential costs and benefits of EB management.

2008

Kovner, A.R. 2008. Governance, Management, and Accountability in AR Kovner and J. Knickman (eds.) Health Care Delivery in the United States, New York, Springer, 9th edition,
View Book
Abstract

How do we understand and also assess the health care of America? Where is health care provided? What are the characteristics of those institutions which provide it? Over the short term, how are changes in health care provisions affecting the health of the population, the cost of care, and access to care? These core issues regarding our health policy are answered in this text.This is a textbook for course work in health care, the handbook for administrators and policy makers, and the standard for in-service training programs

Kovner, A.R. & Johnas, S. (eds.). 2008. Health Care Delivery in the United States New York, Springer, 9th edition,
Abstract

How do we understand and also assess the health care of America? Where is health care provided? What are the characteristics of those institutions which provide it? Over the short term, how are changes in health care provisions affecting the health of the population, the cost of care, and access to care? Health Care Delivery in the United States, 8 th Edition discusses these and other core issues in the field. Under the editorship of Dr. Kovner and with the addition of Dr. James Knickman, Senior VP of Evaluation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, leading thinkers and practitioners in the field examine how medical knowledge creates new healthcare services. Emerging and recurrent issues from wide perspectives of health policy and public health are also discussed. With an easy to understand format and a focus on the major core challenges of the delivery of health care, this is the textbook of choice for course work in health care, the handbook for administrators and policy makers, and the standard for in-service training programs.

Kovner, A.R. & Knickman, J 2008. The State of Health Delivery in the United States in AR Kovner and J. Knickman (eds), Health Care Delivery in the United States, New York, Springer, 9th edition,
View Book
Abstract

How do we understand and also assess the health care of America? Where is health care provided? What are the characteristics of those institutions which provide it? Over the short term, how are changes in health care provisions affecting the health of the population, the cost of care, and access to care? These core issues regarding our health policy are answered in this text.This is a textbook for course work in health care, the handbook for administrators and policy makers, and the standard for in-service training programs

2006

Kovner, A.R. & Rundall, T.G. 2006. The Promise of Evidence-Based Management Frontiers of Health Services Management, Spring 2006, Vol 22, No 3, 3-22.
View Publication
Abstract

More and more, healthcare providers are committing to evidenced-based clinical practice as a rational way to deliver care. Rather than make decisions anecdotally, clinicians find that the addition of research provides statistical evidence for their decisions, and thus should result in better, more consistent care. But, what about management decisions? Shouldn't evidence also be sought by hospital executives before making strategic decisions that will affect their organizations? Do not these decisions also affect the quality and safety of patient care? And if so, what is preventing executives from using such evidence before making these decisions? This issue of Frontiers explores these questions from both the research and practitioner points of view. In the feature article, "Evidence-Based Management Reconsidered," Anthony Kovner, PhD (professor of health policy and management at New York University), and Thomas Rundall, PhD (professor of organized health systems at University of California-Berkeley), make the case for why evidence-based health services management (EBHSM) can and should be used. Kovner and Rundall suggest that EBHSM can be applied to core business transactions, as well as to operational and strategic management, and they elaborate on a five-step process for making that happen. Acknowledging that there is little use of the EBHSM approach in the field today, the authors recommend strategies to facilitate greater use of this model.

The three commentaries explore the issues raised in the above articles. All of the authors agree that evidence-based management is an idea whose time has come. From all the "evidence," it has become clear that more often than not clinical errors occur as a result of a system failure-management-type decisions made without the proper knowledge and information. So, what will it take to get EBHSM implemented throughout healthcare? Hopefully, some of the ideas and strategies presented in this issue will get us closer to that goal.

 

2005

Kovner, A.R. & C.T. Kovner. 2005. Dear Chief Executive Officer: The Perceptions of a Recently Discharged Patient Quality Management of Health Care, Fall 2005, Vol 14, No 4, 219-223.
Abstract

Details the hospital experience of a health professional who underwent cardiac arterial bypass graft on the said urban medical center. Errors or potential errors that were cited in the way that ancillary staff, nurses and even some physicians failed in or neglected their responsibilities, both medical and humane; System failures observed, largely in the provision of nonclinical, so called hotel services; Possible cause of many of the problems identified.

2004

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D. 2004. Health Services Management: Readings, Cases and Commentary Chicago: Health Administration Press, 8th edition,
Abstract

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks. This text-newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases-offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management that will help your students learn the role of manager in a healthcare organization.

Throughout its past editions, Health Services Management has featured the best literature on health services management to help learners understand the role of the manager, organizational design and control, the blending of organization and health professionals, change (adaptation), and responsiveness (accountability). This new edition continues that effort, and features new readings and classroom-tested cases.

The cases take place in a variety of organizations, including a faculty practice, a neighborhood health center, a small rural hospital, an HMO, as well as a variety of other settings. This book will prepare your future managers for the multitude of healthcare settings they could face in their careers.

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D. 2004. Reorganizing Primary Care at Mount Sinai Hospital Health Services Management: Readings, Cases and Commentary, 8th ed.  Chicago, Health Administration Press,
Abstract

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks.

This text�newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases�offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management.

Throughout its past editions, Health Services Management has featured the best literature on health services management to help readers understand the role of the manager, organizational design and control, the blending of organization and health professionals, change (adaptation), and responsiveness (accountability). This new edition continues that effort, and features new readings.

The cases take place in a variety of organizations, including a faculty practice, a neighborhood health center, a small rural hospital, an HMO, as well as a variety of other settings.

2003

Kovner, A.R. 2003. Agenda Setting for Health Care Management Research: Report of a Conference Health Care Management Review, Vol. 28, No. 4, pp. 319-322.
Abstract

Highlights the "Agenda Setting for Health Care Management Research," conference held in New York City on January 23-24, 2003. Generating research funding; Barriers to using management research; Overcoming barriers to funding.

Kovner, A.R. 2003. Evidence-Based Trends: A Course in Health Services Management Journal of Health Administration Education, Vol. 20, No. 4, pages 235-242.
Abstract

This article traces the development of a course in health services management over 40 years and presents the course within a context of teaching evidence-based management. One emphasis of the course is on teaching through storytelling--students developing learning capability to listen to what each stakeholder has to say, and then figuring what to do about it. Students share evidence from the professor's own work experience, the student's own work experience, peer-reviewed published articles, and case studies.

Kovner, A.R. 2003. Teaching Evidence-Based Healthcare Management: Context and Overview of the Special Issue Journal of Health Administration Education, Vol. 20, No. 4, pages 221-224.

2002

Kovner, A.R. 2002. Governance and Management in A.R. Kovner and S. Jonas (eds.) Health Care Delivery in the United States, New York, Springer, 7th edition, pp 339-62.
Abstract

How do we understand and also assess the health care of America? Where is health care provided? What are the characteristics of those institutions which provide it? Over the short term, how are changes in health care provisions affecting the health of the population, the cost of care and access to care? These core questions regarding our health policy are answered in this text.

Kovner, A.R. 2002. Hospitals in A.R. Kovner and S. Jonas (eds.) Health Care Delivery in the United States, New York, Springer, 7th edition, pp 145-72.
Abstract

How do we understand and also assess the health care of America? Where is health care provided? What are the characteristics of those institutions which provide it? Over the short term, how are changes in health care provisions affecting the health of the population, the cost of care and access to care? These core questions regarding our health policy are answered in this text.

Kovner, A.R. 2002. Managers, Teachers, Researchers: Sharing Experience in Health Care Health Care Management Review, 27 (4), pp. 68-75.
Abstract

The author observes that academic training is an asset for any managerial position in the health sector. As with medicine and nursing, health care management should be more evidence-based. The author argues that top managers in health care generally lack adequate internal support to rigorously evaluate strategic interventions or consultant recommendations and to learn from industrywide best practices.
2001

Kovner, A.R. 2001. Better Information for the Board Journal of Healthcare Management, 46:1, Jan-Feb 2001, pp 53-66.
Abstract

Focuses on the importance of adequate management information for the performance of hospital boards in the United States. Responsibilities of board members in healthcare organizations; Adaptation of organization mission and strategy; Key recommendations to board members and managers.

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D. (eds.) 2001. Health Services Management: Readings and Commentary Chicago, Health Administration Press, 7th edition,
Abstract

Managers of a healthcare organization have numerous demands on their time, their skills, their knowledge, and their budgets. They are responsible for adapting to change, managing their office, making effective decisions, among countless other tasks. This text-newly revised to include readings, commentary, and cases-offers a bridge from management theory to the actual world of healthcare management that will help your students learn the role of manager in a healthcare organization.

Kovner, A.R. 2001. Interview from the Field: A Conversation with Anthony R. Kovner on Management Research The Journal of Health Administration, 20:1, Winter 2002, pp. 84-87.

Kovner, A.R. 2001. The Future of Health Care Management Education: An Evidence-Based Approach Journal of Health Administration Education, pp 107-116.

Kovner, A.R. & Neuhauser, D. (eds.) 2001. The Physician-Led Organization Health Services Management: A Book of Cases, 6th Ed.  Chicago, Health Administration press,
Abstract

This book of updated cases emphasizes a manager's need for skills in strategy, operations, and relations. To aid both professors and students, the cases are divided into the same categories as are used in Health Services Management: Readings and Commentary, Seventh Edition: role of the manager, control, organizational design, professional integration, adaptation, and accountability. All of the cases have been tested in the classroom.

2000

Kovner, A.R. & Channing, A.H. 2000. A Career Guide for Health Services Managers Chicago, Health Administration Press, 3rd edition,
Abstract

Learn the professional and personal skills necessary to succeed as a healthcare executive. This book covers everything from finding your niche to working with clinicians. Topics covered include: * Where health services managers work * How to build an ideal career * What skills make a good manager * How to manage physicians, boards, and others * How to advance within an organization and within the industry

Kovner, A.R. 2000. Health Care Management in Mind: Eight Careers New York, Springer,

Kovner, A.R., Elton, J.J. & Billings, J. 2000. Transforming Health Management: An Evidence Based Approach Frontiers of Health Services Management, 16:4, Summer 2000, pp 3-24.
Abstract

Explores the concept of evidence-based management, demonstrates how it can enhance health management practice, and introduces an organizational structure for promoting the evidence-based approach. Challenge of making better-informed strategic decisions; Management research in healthcare; Approaches related to evidence-based management; Evidence-based management decision making; Case vignettes.

1999

Kovner, A.R. 1999. Health Maintenance Organizations and Managed Care in Kovner, A.R. and S. Jonas (eds.)Health Care Delivery in the United States. New York, Springer, 6th edition, pp 279-306.

Kovner, A.R., Sparer, M. & Brown, L. 1999. Implementing Medicaid Managed Care: The New York City Story Journal of Health Care Finance, 26:1, Fall 1999, pp 1-17, also published in Managed Care Quarterly 7:4, Autumn 1999, pp 49-61.

1997

Kovner, A.R., Ritvo, R. & Holland, T. 1997. Board Development in Two Hospitals: Lessons from Demonstrations Hospital and Health Services Administration Spring 1997, Vol. 42 No. 1 pp 87-99.
Abstract

Explores approaches in improving the effectiveness of nonprofit hospitals' boards of trustees as shown by the Alpha Health Care System and Beta Hospital. Kellogg project on effective governance; Factors influencing changes; Board assessment; Initiation of board development; Importance of time management; Chief executive officer's support to strengthen board effectiveness.

Kovner, A.R. et al. 1997. Health Services Management: A Book of Cases, 5th edition. Health Administration Press, Chicago.

Kovner, A.R., Holland, T. & Ritvo, R. 1997. Improving Board Effectiveness Chicago, America Hospital Publishing.

1996

Kovner, A.R. 1996. Assessing Medicaid Managed Care in Eastern State Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Spring 1996, 15:2, pp 276-284.
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Abstract

This case examines the expanding role of managed care programs in improving health care for the poor while controlling runaway health care costs. The case asks what the commissioner of health in a large eastern state should do to effectively monitor Medicaid managed care programs in her state. The commissioner faces intense pressures for cost containment and strong, but not universal, support for the managed care solution to health care cost problems. The commissioner is herself concerned that the cost savings attributed to managed care may not be real and that the unintended effects on health care may be adverse. Her immediate challenge is to determine what kinds of data she should require service providers to submit to her agency so that she may effectively monitor managed care programs for health care quality, provide positive feedback to health care providers, and establish politically credible program oversight.

Kovner, A.R. 1996. Management Development for Mid-Level Managers: Results of a Demonstration Project Hospital and Health Services Administration Winter 1996, Vol. 41 No. 4, pp 485-502.
Abstract

Examines a demonstration program to develop skills and experience for middle managers ar a mid-sized urban hospital in the United States. Background information on the management development program at the New York Downtown Hospital; Participation by middle and senior management; Program curriculum; Program weaknesses, opportunities, threats; Recommendations for replication.

1995

Kovner, A.R. 1995. Strategic Leadership: A New Course for Clinician Managers Journal of Health Administration Education Summer 1995, Vol. 13 No. 3, pp 473-83.