Jewell Jackson McCabe

Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Administration

Jewell Jackson McCabe

With wide-ranging experience in both the public and private sectors, Jewell Jackson McCabe is a business woman who serves as a director on a variety of boards, is a Presidential, Gubernatorial and Mayoral appointee, a consultant to major corporations, cultural and civic institutions and is organizer founder of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women. In 1993 Ms. McCabe was one of four candidates on the “short list” for president of the NAACP becoming the first woman in 84 years under consideration for chief executive officer of America’s leading civil rights organization. She has been featured on news and general interest programs, including the Charlie Rose and the Today Show.

Ms. McCabe is a former corporate director of Reliance Group Holdings, a publicly held Fortune 500 holding company. She is currently president of the board of the Independent Filmmaker Project [IFP]. She served as a trustee on the board of Bard College and was the first Black trustee of the board of The Wharton School of Business, where she served for ten years, holds two Honorary Doctorates. Ms. McCabe was appointed by President Clinton to the United State Holocaust Memorial Council where she was a member of the Holocaust Council’s congressionally-mandated Committee on Conscience. Governor Mario M. Cuomo appointed Ms. McCabe to the New York State Council on Fiscal and Economic priorities. She was appointed Chair of the New York State Job Training Partnership Council the federal block grant to train the disadvantaged. Mayor Koch appointed Ms. McCabe to the New York City Commission on the Status Women, she was subsequently reappointed by both Mayors Dinkins and Giuliani. Her overriding objective as noted in an article in Fortune Magazine “Is to establish common ground for women-of-color between the public and private sectors.”

 

Women have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women’s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential.

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This interdisciplinary course examines the causes and consequences of racial inequality in the American city. We will analyze the strategies, tools, and public policies that impact marginalized groups. Our study will focus primarily on the roles of both electoral and institutional politics.

This course has been designed to underscore the necessity of understanding spatial manifestations of inequality (e.g. segregation) as an essential tool for deciphering the characteristics of oppressive institutional power and public policy.

This course is focused on three key dimensions of work as presented in our required reading and course assignments:  1) Dismantling structural inequalities: how does a spatial lens help to identify and address the root causes of discrimination; 2) Expanding by transforming (disrupt) the scope: how can focusing on spatial manifestations of inequality be used to impact analytical and political frames to make visible distinct forms of oppression; and, 3) Exacting accountability for "all lives mattering": how geography is crucial to develop and enact meaningful comprehensive justice oriented public policy.

Download Syllabus

Women have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women’s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential.

Download Syllabus

This interdisciplinary course examines the causes and consequences of racial inequality in the American city. We will analyze the strategies, tools, and public policies that impact marginalized groups. Our study will focus primarily on the roles of both electoral and institutional politics.

This course has been designed to underscore the necessity of understanding spatial manifestations of inequality (e.g. segregation) as an essential tool for deciphering the characteristics of oppressive institutional power and public policy.

This course is focused on three key dimensions of work as presented in our required reading and course assignments:  1) Dismantling structural inequalities: how does a spatial lens help to identify and address the root causes of discrimination; 2) Expanding by transforming (disrupt) the scope: how can focusing on spatial manifestations of inequality be used to impact analytical and political frames to make visible distinct forms of oppression; and, 3) Exacting accountability for "all lives mattering": how geography is crucial to develop and enact meaningful comprehensive justice oriented public policy.

Download Syllabus

Women have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women’s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential.

Download Syllabus

Women have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women’s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential.

Download Syllabus