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Micro-insurance: The Next Revolution

Micro-insurance: The Next Revolution

Most citizens and businesses in developing countries cannot buy insurance against common risks; insurance markets are thin and public responses are limited. Health insurance, life insurance, and property insurance are unobtainable for average citizens in most of the world, and this is doubly so for the poorest. Wagner Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics Jonathan Morduch describes why, and how new ideas can change things. Others have so far focused mainly on how to build strong institutions that can provide insurance. In this essay instead the focus is on the design of products that can most help poor customers deal with risks.

Microfinance and social-justice philanthropy

Microfinance and social-justice philanthropy

Professor Jonathan Morduch's research about microfinance, a growing prescription for global poverty, will have him delivering talks this spring at the World Bank, Yale School of Management, Wharton School, Columbia Graduate School of Business, and the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business. He spoke with NPR affiliate KQED out of the San Francisco Bay Area on Apr. 6, 2007 about microfinance and social-justice philanthropy, and was turned to for an article on the microfinance movement in the April 16 issue in Time magazine.

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