Date Title Podcast Doc More
03/27/2012 No Time to Lose: The Promise and Policy Implications of Expanded Learning Time

No Time to Lose: The Promise and Policy Implications of Expanded Learning Time

Join the Wagner Education Policy Studies Association (WEPSA) and a panel of experts as they discuss the various policy implications, funding impacts, and programmatic approaches to extending the day and expanding learning time in and outside of schools. As charter schools, after-school partnerships, and other models increasingly challenge the traditional school day, districts are becoming more innovative in their approaches to time. Philanthropic organizations also play a powerful role in this nonprofit-public-policy dynamic, building the capacity of nonprofits to pursue innovative solutions and raising the bar for impact and results. Representatives from a non-profit after-school program, philanthropy, a policy intermediary, and the Department of Education, among others, will examine this timely issue.

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03/26/2012 Dual Language Public Schools: Policy, Practice, & Implications for Research

Dual Language Public Schools: Policy, Practice, & Implications for Research

Presented by Berman Jewish Policy Archive

How do dual language public schools advance the cultural horizons of their students and work for a healthier society at large? These schools engage the interest and concerns of numerous stakeholders, among them: educators, parents, scholars, and ethnic/religious communities. Can they, do they and should they serve as vehicles for cultural preservation and identity transmission?

Join a diverse group of scholars and practitioners as we discuss:

--Major objectives of dual language public schools, both in terms of the student and the larger society.

--The major objections to dual language public schools and impediments to their growth and success.

--Creating a research agenda to advance the discourse on the dialectic above.

The discussion will take place from 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM with a reception to follow.

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03/22/2012 Addressing Diversity in the Workplace: An interactive workshop

Addressing Diversity in the Workplace: An interactive workshop

Presented by Wagner Management and Leadership Organization, Alliance of Latin American Students, Stonewall Policy Alliance, and Wagner Women's Caucus

WMLO Workshop Facilitator: David P. Rivera, Doctoral Candidate in Counseling Psychology, Columbia University

How Well Do You Manage Diversity?
WMLO, in partnership with ALAS, SPA and WWC, is hosting an interactive workshop to address and understand how to manage the different dimensions of race, culture, ethnicity, physical abilities, age, gender, sexual orientation, and other characteristics that give rise to a variety of perspectives, affecting performance, motivation, success, and interactions with others in the workplace.

The learning objectives for the workshop are:

* To increase knowledge about diversity in the workplace
* To encourage self-awareness about cultural and social identities and our individual biases, attitudes, and behaviors
* To develop skills to effectively address diversity in the workplace.

Refreshments and Drinks will be served during the workshop

Facilitator Bio: David P. Rivera
David P. Rivera, M.S. is a doctoral candidate in counseling psychology at Teachers College, Columbia University. He holds degrees in psychology and counseling from Johns Hopkins University and the University of Wyoming. His research focuses on issues impacting the marginalization and health of people of color and sexual minorities. David’s research has been published in The Counseling Psychologist, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, and The Journal of Counseling and Development. His work also includes publications on workplace diversity issues. He has received multiple recognitions for his work, including national honors from the American Psychological Association and the American College Counseling Association.

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03/22/2012 IPSA's Discussion of Chronic Disease and Economic Development in Nicaragua with La Isla Foundation

IPSA's Discussion of Chronic Disease and Economic Development in Nicaragua with La Isla Foundation

In recent decades, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as a devastating epidemic in the agricultural communities near Chichigalpa, Nicaragua. Studies have shown a developing epidemiological pattern that differs from traditional causes, with CKD most prevalent among young, male agricultural workers.

La Isla Foundation was formed in 2008 with the aim of reducing the burden of disease on affected communities. By engaging with individuals on the ground and coordinating the efforts of health institutions from around the world, La Isla Foundation has helped bring attention to communities which sit at the fault lines of global issues.

Join the International Public Service Association (IPSA), Alliance of Latino and Latin American Students (ALAS), Wagner Health Network (WHN), and Wagner Food Policy Alliance (WFPA) for a presentation by the La Isla Foundation with a Q and A session and a reception to follow.

Read more at the Huffington Post website: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/02/12/mystery-disease-central-america_n_1272286.html

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03/21/2012 State of the Digital City: Government 2.0 and its Impact on Policymaking

State of the Digital City: Government 2.0 and its Impact on Policymaking

Presented by Wagner Policy Alliance

In 2011, Mayor Bloomberg’s office rolled out its Road Map for the Digital City, a vanguard municipal plan for increasing avenues for digital engagement, government transparency, and data accessibility for New York City residents and businesses. One year later, the City boasts hundreds of recently released data sets, dozens of apps developed through city-supported hackathons and competitions, more than 200 social media engagement channels, and GovFresh’s 2011 City of the Year award for its leadership in technology-supported democracy. Clearly, much is happening on the web—but what is the impact on the ground? How have the City’s digital initiatives affected public service? Who is engaging? And what changes will government 3.0 bring?

Join the Wagner Policy Alliance for a panel discussion and reception with esteemed experts and practitioners.

Panelists:
NYC Council Member Gale Brewer, Founding Chair of the Committee on Technology in Government

John Kaehny, Executive Director and Founding Board Member, Reinvent Albany

Anthony Townsend, Research Director, Institute for the Future, and NYU Adjunct Assistant Professor

Moderator:
Shankar Prasad, NYU Adjunct Associate Professor and Yourlist.org Founder

Sponsored by NYU Wagner's Urban Planning Student Association and NYU Law School's Law and Government Society

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03/20/2012 Rudin Center for Transportation Presents "The Five Borough Taxi Plan: A Discussion with NYC Taxi and Limousine Commissioner David Yassky"

Rudin Center for Transportation Presents "The Five Borough Taxi Plan: A Discussion with NYC Taxi and Limousine Commissioner David Yassky"

Announced by Governor Cuomo in December 2011, the Five Borough Taxi Plan is a Taxi and Limousine Commission approved bill that will issue 18,000 permits to livery cabs, which will allow them to pick up street hails in: Brooklyn, Queens (airports are not included), the Bronx, Staten Island, and Manhattan above East 96th Street and above West 110th Street.

The new permit holding vehicles will be equipped with special markings for easy identification, a roof light, a meter, a credit card reader, and GPS tracking. In addition, the plan will require a specific percentage of the permits to be issued to wheelchair accessible vehicles. The bill also allows for the Taxi and Limousine Commission to sell 2,000 additional taxicab medallions.

Join us for a conversation with Commissioner Yassky about these and other aspects of the new Five Borough Taxi Plan.

David Yassky is the eleventh person to serve as Commissioner/Chairman of the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission. Previously, Commissioner Yassky completed eight years of service in the New York City Council, representing the neighborhoods of Brooklyn Heights, Park Slope, Greenpoint and Williamsburg. On the Council, he sponsored legislation to promote the use of fuel-efficient hybrid cars as taxicabs and authored innovative laws in the areas of affordable housing and economic development.

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03/13/2012 Roundtable Discussion on Long-Term Liabilities & Re-thinking Pension Investments

Roundtable Discussion on Long-Term Liabilities & Re-thinking Pension Investments

Presented by The Fund for Public Advocacy, in partnership with the Office of New York City Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and the NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, with generous support from The New York Community Trust and the Peterson Foundation. Co-sponsored by the The Wagner Economics and Finance Association.

Introductory Remarks
Bernard Schwartz
Chairmen and CEO, BLS Investments
 
Panel Discussion
Mike Fishman, 32BJ Service Employees International Union
Steven Lydenberg, Hauser Center for Nonprofit Organizations at Harvard University
Peter Goldmark, Former Budget Director of New York State

Moderated by
Dr. Mark Funkhouser, Director of Governing Institute and Former Mayor of Kansas City

The Fund for Public Advocacy, in partnership with the Office of New York City Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and the NYU’s Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, with generous support from The New York Community Trust and the Peterson Foundation, is sponsoring a series of roundtable discussions to engage members of the public, government officials, and other key stakeholders on New York City’s long-term liabilities.  The previous roundtables explored pensions and healthcare, and this one will focus on rethinking pension investments.
 
Pension funds for public employees are powerful investors with large amounts of assets.  New York City alone currently has $115.2 billion in assets under management.  Strong investment performance is essential to the long-term financial health of the City.  How these funds invest not only affects rates of return, but also has the potential to yield complementary benefits to the community.  Investments may be targeted to spur economic drivers such as infrastructure improvements, housing development, and new enterprise – and create jobs along the way.  This roundtable will explore the benefits, risks, and challenges to implementing new ways of investing.

8:00 AM -- Registration 8:30 AM -- Keynote & Panel Discussion   Refreshments and a light breakfast will be provided.
 
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03/06/2012 A Conversation with Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center

A Conversation with Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Director of the Schomburg Center

On March 6, 2012, Wagner's Black Student Alliance (BSA) and Students for Criminal Justice Reform (SCJR) will welcome Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, the Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and author of "The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America" to NYU.


Women of Color Policy Network Executive Director and NYU Wagner Professor Dr. Nicole Mason will interview Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad about the work of the Schomburg Center, as well as his book on the criminal justice system and its effect on black men, "The Condemnation of Blackness."  This will be followed by a question and answer period.

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03/06/2012 The Politics of Truth, Justice and Reconciliation: A Comparative Study on Argentina, Chile, Peru and Uruguay

The Politics of Truth, Justice and Reconciliation: A Comparative Study on Argentina, Chile, Peru and Uruguay

Dr. Vilma "Nina" Balmaceda, Director, Center for Scholarship and Global Engagement; Associate Professor of Political Science, Nyack College.  
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03/05/2012 NYU MEATLESS MONDAYS LAUNCH

NYU MEATLESS MONDAYS LAUNCH
Monday, March 5th | 12-2PM
Rudin Forum

You have the power to reduce climate change with every meal you eat. Join the Climate Change: It's What's For Dinner as we launch a series of meatless events around campus.

Come join the Meatless Mondays campaign launch, featuring:

-Tasty *free* vegetarian food from Sacred Chow

-Sustainable Lunch Maps for good options around NYU

-Meat-free meal guides to cook your own tasty veggie-friendly food

-Raffles for local restaurants

Curious about the carbon footprint of your meals? The meat industry contributes to our emissions much more than most of us realize. Livestock alone creates more greenhouse gas emissions than all the cars, trucks, planes, and other fossil-fueled modes of transportation in the world according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in their widely cited report, Livestock's Long Shadow. In fact, our current food system--from industrial farming to packaging to transporting--contributes as much as one-third of total greenhouse gas emissions. Some reports even tip the scale closer to half.

Pledge to go meatless on Mondays this year and join the movement to cut the meat, once a week. All students and staff participating in MM this year will receive buttons, recipes and resources to lower our environmental footprint. Collective pledges will be aggregated to measure our communal impact throughout the year.

The Climate Change: It's What's For Dinner campaign is a joint collaboration of the Wagner Food Policy Alliance, the Wagner Climate Coalition, NYU Steinhardt Food Studies, NYU Law/Students for Animal Legal Defense Fund and is supported by a Green Grant from the NYU Office of Sustainability.

Follow the action, find recipes and connect with resources: Twitter | Website | Questions?  Email bronsing@nyu.edu

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02/29/2012 WEPSA Networking Reception

WEPSA Networking Reception

Presented by Wagner Education Policy Studies Association

The Networking Receptions is a time for current graduate students, alumni, and leaders and practitioners in the education field to make meaningful connections.

Mingle with education leaders in the NYC community and learn more about the activities these organizations engage in and what it takes to lead these agencies.

Agencies attending include the NYC Department of Education, Citizen Schools, The After School Corporation, Revolution Foods, Uncommon Goods, and many more.

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02/28/2012 Accountability to Beneficiaries of Humanitarian Aid: What is it and How Can it Be Measured?

Accountability to Beneficiaries of Humanitarian Aid: What is it and How Can it Be Measured?

Mark Foran, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine; Attending Emergency Physician, Bellevue Hospital Center and NYU Langone Medical Center; Associate Faculty, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative  
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02/24/2012 Cine ALAS

Cine ALAS

Join the Association for Latin@s and Allies in Public Service for a screening of Fresa y Chocolate, (Strawberry and Chocolate), a seminal film exploring LGBT issues in communist Cuba. Conversations about themes central to the film within the modern Cuban context and networking to follow.

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02/21/2012 Going Solo: A Conversation about Cities, Social Policy, and Public Sociology with Eric Klinenberg and Sudhir Venkatesh

Going Solo: A Conversation about Cities, Social Policy, and Public Sociology with Eric Klinenberg and Sudhir Venkatesh
Co-sponsored by the Craft of Ethnography Project, a joint initiative of the Columbia University Department of Sociology and the NYU Institute for Public Knowledge.

The incredible rise of living alone is the greatest social change that we’ve failed to name and identify, let alone understand. In 1950, four million Americans lived alone. Today, more 32 million do, accounting for 28 percent of American households. The rates of living alone are even higher in urban areas. More than 40 percent of all households consist of just one person in Atlanta, Denver, Seattle, San Francisco, and Minneapolis. In Manhattan, the figure is nearly 50 percent.
 

Eric Klinenberg examines the seismic impact of these changes in his new book, Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (Penguin Press). In this public event, the renowned Columbia University sociologist and best-selling author Sudhir Venkatesh joins Klinenberg in conversation.  They will discuss Going Solo, the state of contemporary cities, and the reemergence of public sociology.

 

Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology, Public Policy, and Media, Culture, and Communications at New York University, and editor of the journal Public Culture. His books include Heat Wave:  A Social Autopsy of Disaster in Chicago, which won six scholarly and literary prizes and is currently being adapted as a feature documentary, and Fighting for Air: The Battle to Control America’s Media. In addition to his scholarly publications, Klinenberg has contributed to the New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, Fortune, the Wall Street Journal, the London Review of Books, and This American Life.  (Listen to a story from Going Solo on a podcast from This American Life).

Sudhir Venkatesh is William B. Ransford Professor of Sociology, and the Committee on Global Thought, at Columbia University. His most recent book is Gang Leader for a Day (Penguin Press), which received a Best Book award from The Economist and is currently being translated into several languages. His previous books include Off the Books: The Underground Economy of the Urban Poor (Harvard University Press, 2006) about illegal economies in Chicago, and American Project: The Rise and Fall of a Modern Ghetto (2000) about life in Chicago public housing. Venkatesh’s editorial writings have appeared in The New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and the Washington Post, and his stories have appeared in This American Life, WIRED, and on National Public Radio.

 
A book signing with both speakers will immediately follow the conversation.  Both books will be available for sale.
 

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02/21/2012 The United States and its Covert War in Mexico: Who’s Winning?
The United States and its Covert War in Mexico: Who’s Winning? Ginger Thompson, Washington Correspondent, The New York Times  
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02/21/2012 Rudin Center for Transportation Presents "A Conversation with Council Member James Vacca"

Rudin Center for Transportation Presents "A Conversation with Council Member James Vacca"

Council Member Vacca’s involvement in public service and transportation policy began early in life at the age of 13 when he organized his fellow JHS students to rally for better bus service from the MTA. Before long, he was fighting for stop signs, traffic lights, the fixing of potholes, and other local issues that affected his community.

In 1980, at the age of 25, Mr. Vacca became the District Manager of Community Board #10, where he served until he took office as Councilmember of the 13th District in January of 2006. For 26 years as District Manager, he fought for one of the most diverse districts in the borough. At Community Board #10, Jimmy Vacca was constantly in the vanguard on issues facing the residents of his district. Since he started fighting against graffiti and other types of "quality of life" crimes in the 1980's, his former community board district benefited from his proactive stance by being rated both the safest and cleanest in the Bronx for many years. Over the past several years, he has been the voice of the community in its efforts against rampant overdevelopment, and through his leadership, City Island, Throggs Neck, and Ferry Point were recently rezoned to stop the rapid growth in these neighborhoods.

Today, Mr. Vacca represents the Bronx’s 13th Council district which includes the areas of Pelham Parkway North and South, Pelham Bay, Country Club, City Island, Throggs Neck, Allerton, and Morris Park. As chair of the New York City Council Committee on Transportation, Mr. Vacca plays an integral role in the transportation and infrastructure policymaking.

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02/17/2012 IPSA's Book Launch of Ecomind by Frances Moore Lappé

IPSA's Book Launch of Ecomind by Frances Moore Lappé

What if the ecological crisis were, at heart, a crisis of perception? In her new book, EcoMind, Frances Moore Lappé helps facilitate a much needed shift.

Join the International Public Service Association (IPSA) for a discussion and book launch with Moore Lappé. Engage in the dialogue with the NYU community about developing your own Ecomind. Appetizers and drinks will be served. The event will be followed by a small reception.

The author argues that much of what is wrong with the world, from our eroding soil to our eroding democracies, results from ways of thinking out of synch with human nature and nature’s rhythms. Moore Lappé weaves her analysis together with stories of real people the world over, who, having shifted some basic thought patterns, are shifting the balance of power in our world. She reveals that the gap between the world we long for and the world we thought we were stuck with can be bridged after all--if we can learn to think like an ecosystem. EcoMind shows us the way.

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02/17/2012 Film Screening and Discussion: Invisible Slaves: An MTV EXIT Special

Film Screening and Discussion: Invisible Slaves: An MTV EXIT Special

Please join us for a special screening of Invisible Slaves: An MTV EXIT Special, a documentary film hosted by nineteen time Latin Grammy Award Winners, Calle 13. The screening will be followed by remarks on the partnership between UNICEF and MTV, the challenges and outcomes of using media and celebrity to raise awareness about human trafficking, and a short question and answer session. MTV EXIT is a campaign about freedom — about our rights as human beings to choose where we live, where we work, who our friends are, and who we love.

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02/16/2012 Creating a Sustainable Food Chain from Farm to Fork

Creating a Sustainable Food Chain from Farm to Fork

Please join the Wagner Food Policy Alliance in welcoming Walter Robb, Co-CEO of Whole Foods, and Carolyn Dimitri, Professor of Food Studies at Steinhardt for a lively conversation on organics, ethical supply chain management and the role of institutions, such as Whole Foods, in supporting a sustainable food chain.   Discussion, 6:30-8 PM / Reception, 8-9 PM

Walter Robb, Co-CEO, joined Whole Foods Market in 1991 operating the Mill Valley, CA store until he became president of the Northern Pacific Region in 1993 where he grew the region from two to 17 stores. He became Executive Vice-President of Operations in 2000, Chief Operating Officer in 2001 and Co-President in 2004. Now as Co-CEO, Robb oversees six regions and is on the Whole Planet Foundation Board of Directors. An avid organic advocate, Robb is on the Advisory Board for the Organic Center for Education and Promotion. He is also on the Board of Regents for the University of the Pacific.

Carolyn Dimitri is an applied economist interested in food issues, which includes organic food, local foods, and the economic history of food marketing institutions.  Prior to joining the Food Studies faculty at NYU Steinhardt as a Research Associate Professor, she worked as a senior economist at the Economic Research Service of the US Department of Agriculture for 12 years.  Along with collaborators, she has obtained grants to study retailer and intermediary behavior regarding organic marketing and procurement practices, and urban agriculture around the US. Other recent work includes an analysis of regional food hubs across the country.  Dr. Dimitri earned her Ph.D. in Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park, and a BA in Economics from the University at Buffalo. She blogs at www.sustainablefoodeconomics.com.

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02/15/2012 The Interaction Between Climate, Surface Hydrology, and Human Water Demands
The Interaction Between Climate, Surface Hydrology, and Human Water Demands
Dr. Tara Troy, Earth Institute Post-Doctoral Fellow, IRI, Columbia University   

This discussion explores two case studies on how climate, surface hydrology, and human water demands interact. The first case focuses on Northern Eurasia to examine how changes in climate are driving changes in the surface hydrology. Through the use of a numerical land surface model and in-situ observations, Dr. Troy shows that the interactions of precipitation and temperature trends during the past century have resulted in changes in the snowpack and streamflow in the region. The second case focuses on the interactions of climate variability and human water demands in the Indus River Basin, the breadbaskets of India and Pakistan. 

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02/15/2012 The Road Map to Ending Trafficking: Policy, Law Enforcement and Social Services

The Road Map to Ending Trafficking: Policy, Law Enforcement and Social Services

Brownbag lunch panel on the system-level ways we approach the issue of ending human trafficking in NYC and the U.S. Emphasis will be placed on the roles, current efforts and common barriers different agencies play and experience in securing justice for trafficking victims.

Tentative speakers include representatives from the NYC Office of the Criminal Justice Coordinator, the Kings County Police Department and Safe Horizon.

This event will start promptly at noon.

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02/14/2012 Pimping in the US: A Deeper Look at Commercialized Sex

Pimping in the US: A Deeper Look at Commercialized Sex

At this Valentine’s Day event, we will learn about domestic sex trafficking of American nationals from Bradley Myles, Executive Director of Polaris Project. Afterwards, guests are invited to a dessert and drinks reception with representatives from various organizations serving women and children engaged in prostitution.

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02/14/2012 Mega-dams, Oil and 'Terrorists': Blowback from U.S. Geopolitics in the Horn of Africa

Mega-dams, Oil and 'Terrorists':  Blowback from U.S. Geopolitics in the Horn of Africa

Claudia Carr, Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley  
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02/13/2012 Book Launch: What the U.S. Can Learn from China

Book Launch: What the U.S. Can Learn from China
Presented by Demos and NYU Wagner

Ann Lee, Demos Senior Fellow
in conversation with
Matthew Bishop, US Business Editor and NY Bureau Chief of The Economist

Introduced by Rich Benjamin

While America is still reeling from the financial crisis and high unemployment, China’s economy continues to grow and is predicted by some to surpass the U.S. by 2020. In her new book, What the U.S. Can Learn from China, expert Ann Lee outlines lessons the U.S. can glean from China’s growth.

From education to governance and foreign aid, Lee details the policies and practices that have made China a global power and then isolates the ways the U.S. can use China’s enduring principles to foster much-needed change at home. She does not ignore China’s shortcomings, particularly in the area of human rights, but rather asserts that overemphasizing these differences will cause the US to miss a vital opportunity.

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02/13/2012 Supply Chains: Slave-Made Products in the Global Market

Supply Chains: Slave-Made Products in the Global Market

As part of "Stop Traffic: Human Trafficking Awareness Week," Wagner's International Public Service Association, Wagner's Women's Caucus, and Wagner Health Network are pleased to co-sponsor this kick-off event.

This event will explore the supply chains of some common products, from cocoa to clothing. We will examine our role as consumers in creating the demand for slave-made products, and strategies for ensuring that products are made with adult, compensated labor. Potential speakers will come from The Body Shop, Free the Slaves, Made by Survivors, Kopali Organics, and Human Rights First.

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