Housing & Community Development

Race, Class and Social Control in the Streets

Race, Class and Social Control in the Streets
Sociological Forum. 2001, Vol. 16(4), pp. 759-772.

Conley, D. & Ryvicker, M.
01/01/2001

Jane Jacobs has recently become the most popular, pop sociologist around. There has been a spiked resurgence of media interest in her 1961 urban studies classic, The Death and Life of Great American Cities. This may be due partly to the recent release of her new book, The Nature of Economies. But there is probably something more to it. For journalists, Jacobs' account of the neighborhood life of New York City's Greenwich Village of the 1950s seems to induce nostalgic longings for a greater sense of community. The bustling, narrow streets Jacobs describes were filled with both small shops and tenement residences, with hoards of pedestrians engaged in both business and sociability, and with strangers and lifelong inhabitants alike. This apparent chaos was actually a ballet of multitudes and Jacobs uncovered the latent order that undergirded the community.

Risk and Insurance in Transition: Perspectives from Zouping County, China

Risk and Insurance in Transition: Perspectives from Zouping County, China
Chapter 8 in Community and Market in Economic Development, Oxford University Press, edited by Professors Masahiko Aoki and Yujiro Hayami.

Morduch, J. & Sicular, T.
01/01/2001

This book explores the role of community in facilitating the transition to market relationships in economic development, and in controlling and sustaining local public goods such as irrigation, forests, grazing land, and fishing grounds. Previously it was customary to classify economic systems in terms of varying combinations of state and market control of resource allocation. In contrast, this book recognizes community as the third major element of economic systems. This new approach also departs from the conventional view that markets and community norms should be treated as mutually exclusive means of organizing economic activity, instead clarifying the situations in which they may become complementary. Further discussion focuses on the conditions under which management of local commons can, and should, be delegated to local communities rather than subjected to the control of central government.

State Autonomy & Civil Society: The Lobbyist Connection

State Autonomy & Civil Society: The Lobbyist Connection
Critical Review 2001, Volume 14, Number 2.

Kersh, R.
01/01/2001

The much-noted decline of state autonomy theories owes partly to external challenges to state power, such as globalization, supranational regimes, and the like. But advanced democratic states have also long been seen as threatened from within, especially by powerful private interest groups.The extent of private-interest influence on policy making depends in important part on corporate lobbyists, a group whose activities are chronicled in this essay. Lobbyists exercise considerably more autonomy from the private clients who hire them than has previously been acknowledged. This portrait ultimately suggests that the national state and civil society may be mutually supportive rather than strictly separate spheres.

Universal Freckle

Universal Freckle
lead chapter in The Making and Unmaking of Whiteness,Durham, NC: Duke University Press, *Peer reviewed. Reprinted in Privilege (edited by Michael S. Kimmel) ABC-Clio Press.

Conley, D., Klinenberg, E., Nexica, I., Rasmussen, B.B., Sandell, J. & Matt Wray, (Eds.).
01/01/2001

Bringing together new articles and essays from the controversial Berkeley conference of the same name, "The Making and Unmaking of Whiteness" presents a fascinating range of inquiry into the nature of whiteness. Representing academics, independent scholars, community organizers, and antiracist activists, the contributors are all leaders in the "second wave" of whiteness studies who collectively aim to combat the historical legacies of white supremacy and to inform those who seek to understand the changing nature of white identity, both in the United States and abroad. The editors not only raise provocative questions about the intellectual, social, and political goals of those interested in the study of whiteness but assess several of the topic's major recurrent themes: the visibility of whiteness (or the lack thereof); the "emptiness" of whiteness as a category of identification; and conceptions of whiteness as a structural privilege, a harbinger of violence, or an institutionalization of European imperialism.

An Affordable Debt Policy for New York State and New York City

An Affordable Debt Policy for New York State and New York City
Citizens Budget Commission, October,

Richwerger, K. & Brecher, C.
10/01/2000

Do New York State and New York City have too much debt? This report addresses the question by presenting criteria for deciding how much state and local debt is affordable, and recommending how those criteria should be applied to decisions by New York State and New York City. This report provides a measure that can be used by states and cities throughout the nation to judge the impact that their debt will have on their ability to compete with other jurisdictions effectively.

Race-Based Neighborhood Projection: A Proposed Framework for Understanding New Data on Racial Integration

Race-Based Neighborhood Projection: A Proposed Framework for Understanding New Data on Racial Integration
Urban Studies 37(9), Aug 2000, pp. 1513-1533.

Ellen, I.G.
08/01/2000

This paper outlines the race-based, neighbourhood projection hypothesis which holds that, in choosing neighbourhoods, households care less about present racial composition than they do about expectations about future neighbourhood conditions, such as school quality, property values and crime. Race remains relevant, however, since households tend to associate a growing minority presence with structural decline. Using a unique data-set that links households to their neighbourhoods, this paper estimates both exit and entry models and then constructs a simple simulation model that predicts the course of racial change in different communities. Doing so, the paper concludes that the empirical evidence is more consistent with the race-based projection hypothesis than with other common explanations for neighbourhood racial transition.

Making More Effective Use of New York State's Prisons

Making More Effective Use of New York State's Prisons
Citizens Budget Commission, May,

Brecher, C. & Lynam, E.
05/01/2000

This report focuses on the cost-effectiveness of the policies of the New York State Department of Correctional Services, and makes four recommendations for achieving operational savings without diminishing public safety. These recommendations are: (1) to extend the reach and effectiveness of tested alternatives, such as boot camp and the CASAT program; (2) to develop new alternatives for additional inmate groups; (3) to reengineer the parole system; (4) to create an enhanced research and development unit.

Federal Housing Policy and the Rise of Nonprofit Providers

Federal Housing Policy and the Rise of Nonprofit Providers
Journal for Housing Research, 11(2):297-317.

O'Regan, K. & Quigley, J.M.
01/01/2000

During the past decade, federal housing policy has shifted to recognize a key role for nonprofit housing providers in providing affordable housing. Two federal programs, Low-Income Housing Tax Credit and HOME, are now the primary federal housing production programs, and the legislation governing both programs provides explicit support for nonprofit providers of new housing. This article focuses on these two programs to document the change in emphasis, looking at the extent to which resources flow to nonprofit providers. We explicate the rationale for this shift and speculate on future federal policy toward nonprofits.

We find that both programs channeled sizable shares of their funding to nonprofits throughout the 1990s, in patterns consistent with program design. It is also possible that the scale and form of funding itself has affected the nonprofit sector. Changes in the funding of nonprofits have not been uniform spatially, and the nonprofit sector's share of such funding appears to have leveled off. As currently structured, these programs do little to simplify the complicated financial dealings and multiple sources of funding common among nonprofit housing providers. Shifts in policy priorities and emerging financial stresses may necessitate changes in federal policy toward the nonprofit sector.

 

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