Transportation

Weather Impact on Transit Ridership in Chicago

Weather Impact on Transit Ridership in Chicago
Transportation Research Record, Vol. 2034, pp. 3-10.

Guo, Z., Wilson, N.H.M. & Rahbee, A.
01/01/2007

This paper explores the weather-ridership relationship and its potential applications in transit operations and planning. Using the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) as a case, the paper investigates the impact of five weather elements (temperature, rain, snow, wind, and fog) on daily bus and rail ridership, and its variation across modes, day types, and seasons. The resulting relationships are applied to the CTA ridership trend analysis, showing how preliminary findings may change after controlling for weather. The paper emphasizes the importance of having a theoretical framework encompassing weather and travel.

High Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements of Success - Part 2

High Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements of Success - Part 2
MTI Report, 06-03, San Jose, CA: Mineta Transportation Institute, November

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
11/01/2006

In August 2005, the Mineta Transportation Institute issued the report, High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements for Success. The report noted that since the 1960s, highspeed ground transportation (HSGT) has "held the promise of fast, convenient, and environmentally sound travel for distances between 40 and 600 miles." After briefly discussing the different experiences with HSGT between the United States and its Asian and European counterparts, the report proceeded to review three U.S. cases-Florida, California, and the Pacific Northwest-as a means for identifying lessons learned for successfully implementing high-speed rail (HSR) in the United States.
This report is, in essence, volume 2 of the previous study. Also using a comparative case study approach, this effort adds to the earlier work with three additional cases-the Chicago Hub, the Keystone Corridor, and the Northeast Corridor (NEC). As with the earlier report, the goal of this study is to identify lessons learned for successfully implementing HSR in the United States. Given the early stages of most of these projects, "success" is defined by whether a given HSR project is still actively pursuing development or funding. However, in the case of the Northeast Corridor, a fuller discussion of success is provided since HSR has been implemented on that corridor for some time now.

Pennsylvania’s “Key” to Successful High Speed Rail

Pennsylvania’s “Key” to Successful High Speed Rail
New York Transportation Journal (NYTJ) 10, 1, Fall 2006, 4-5 .

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
09/01/2006

Many countries have or will soon deploy new high-speed rail (HSR) (separate right-of-way (ROW) using technologies that allow speeds over 200 mph) or Maglev (separate ROW using magnetic levitation technologies allowing speeds beyond 300 mph). In the United States, however, though Congress first authorized studies aimed at deploying HSR in 1965, and despite at least 17 different efforts (some with multiple attempts), over the past 40 years nearly all HSR projects have failed to progress. Further, the two which do exist - the Empire Corridor (between New York City and Albany, NY) and Northeast Corridor (NEC) - fall far short of speeds and performance levels elsewhere.
Last year, the Rudin Center completed a study, funded by the Mineta Transportation Institute (MTI), aimed at identifying key elements for successful US HSR outcomes. The resulting report, described in NYTJ (Spring 2005), summarized US HSR legislative
history and developed in-depth case studies for Florida, the Pacific Northwest, and California. This year, MTI funded the Center to develop three more cases - the Chicago Hub, the NEC, and the Keystone Corridor. The following discussion is derived from the Keystone case which, along with the others is undergoing peer review. As one of the few cases where HSR has been (or is about to be) implemented in the United States, the Keystone holds important lessons for future efforts.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Fall 2006, Vol. 10, No. 1.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Sterman, B.P., (eds).
09/01/2006

This issue features an article by AARP's Robert Hodder on the transportation challenges that older adults face. Also included are articles on Stewart Airport, written by Doreen Frasca of Frasca & Associates, and the Atlanta Beltline project, written by Liz Drake of EDAW. In addition, Joel Ettinger of NYMTC writes about new approaches for improving transportation planning in the New York metropolitan region.

Danger Ahead! How to Balance the MTA’s Budget

Danger Ahead! How to Balance the MTA’s Budget
Citizens Budget Commission, June

Brecher, C.
06/01/2006

Despite its essential role in sustaining the New York economy, the MTA is not financed in a consistent or sensible
manner. Specifically, the financing arrangements for the MTA result in:
Problem 1: Repeated operating deficits.
Problem 2: Capital investments insufficient to bring its facilities to a state of good repair.

In order for New York to maintain a strong and vibrant economy, its transportation system has to be kept up to par and expanded to meet future needs. This report examines the two problems and suggests alternative financing policies for the MTA that would balance its operating budget and provide sufficient capital to accelerate the pace at which its facilities are brought to a state of good repair.

The next section describes the vital role of the MTA in transporting people to their jobs in New York's central business district. The following sections explain the MTA's problems identified above, present the CBC's guidelines for funding the MTA services in the future, and estimate the agency's expenditure and revenue requirements under those guidelines. The final section deals with options for meeting revenue requirements by increasing cross subsides from auto users.

Why Partnerships?: Historical and Legislative Background on Public-Private Partnerships for Surface Transportation

Why Partnerships?: Historical and Legislative Background on Public-Private Partnerships for Surface Transportation
Prepared for Innovative Transportation Financing and Contracting Strategies - Opportunities for NY State, Symposium, March

de Cerreño, A.L.C.
03/01/2006

On March 8, 2006, a symposium was held in Albany, New York, on public-private partnerships or Transportation Development Partnerships (TDP) as they are called in the State of New York. Co-sponsored by the New York State Department of Transportation and the University Transportation Research Center housed at the City College of New York, the symposium attracted over 250 guests who heard from 22 speakers from around the world. This symposium was timely as the federal government is encouraging partnerships for transportation projects, many states have implemented partnership projects, and many more states are aggressively investigating the potential for public-private partnerships. These proceedings are intended to describe the presentations made by the speakers at the symposium and advance the discussion on public-private partnerships in transportation.

The New York Transportation Journal

The New York Transportation Journal
Winter 2006, Vol. 9, No. 2.

Sander, E.G., Publisher & de Cerreño, A.L.C, Sterman, B.P., (eds).
02/01/2006

This issue contains an interview with Urban Designer and Architect Jan Gehl by Janette Sadik-Khan, Senior Vice President of Parson Brinckerhoff and President of Company 39. Also included is an article focusing on developing Nassau County, as well as a piece highlighting current Rudin Center research on "Pedestrian and Bicyclist Standards and Innovations in Large Central Cities."

Risks and Costs of a Terrorist Attack on the Electricity System

Risks and Costs of a Terrorist Attack on the Electricity System
The Economic Impacts of Terrorist Attacks Volume 2, edited by H.W. Richardson, P. Gordon and J.E. Moore II, Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishers.

Zimmerman, R., Restrepo, C., Simonoff, J.S. & Lave, L.B.,
01/01/2006

As suggested by the title, this is a collection of essays on the economic effects of successful terrorist attacks focusing on the electrical transmission, and transportation infrastructure of the United States. Those familiar with the literature on the economic effects of natural disasters will
find the arguments and economic models quite familiar. The individual essays are by leading experts who do not necessarily agree on the most appropriate methods or policy conclusions. This provides a refreshing measure of potential controversy.

High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements for Success

High-Speed Rail Projects in the United States: Identifying the Elements for Success
Rudin Center for Transportation Policy and Management, NYU Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, and the Mineta Transportation Institute College of Business, San Jose, State University, October 2005

de Cerreño, A.L.C. & Evans, D.M.
10/15/2005

For almost half a century, high-speed ground transportation (HSGT) has held the promise of fast, convenient, and environmentally sound travel for distances between 40 and 600 miles. While a number of HSGT systems have been developed and deployed in Asia and Europe, none has come close to being implemented in the United States. Yet this is not for lack of trying. There have been several efforts around the country, most of which have failed, some of which are still in the early stages, and a few of which might come to pass. The goal of this study was to identify lessons learned for successfully developing and implementing high-speed rail (HSR) in the United States. Through a broad literature review, interviews, and three specific case studies "Florida, California, and the Pacific Northwest" this study articulates those lessons and presents themes for future consideration.

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