Mark Willis
Adjunct Professor of Urban Planning

Mark Willis is the executive vice president of the Community Development Group at JPMorgan Chase. He joined Chase Manhattan Bank, a predecessor of Morgan Chase, in 1989 as the president of its Chase Community Development Corp. and in 1998 he became the president of the Chase Manhattan Foundation.

Before joining Chase, Mr. Willis had held various positions with the City of New York, culminating in his appointment as the deputy commissioner for development in the Department of Housing Preservation and Development. He has served as the director of the Office of Tax Policy and as the special assistant to the deputy mayor for finance and economic development. He has also held posts in the research department of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and with Maine Printing Co.

Mr. Willis has an undergraduate degree in economics and a Ph.D. in urban economics and industrial organization from Yale University, as well as a degree from Harvard Law School.

Semester Course
Spring 2014 URPL-GP.4638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy

This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2012 URPL-GP.4638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy

This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2011 URPL-GP.4638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy

This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.


Download Syllabus
Spring 2010 URPL-GP.2638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy
This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.
Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 URPL-GP.2638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy
This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.
Download Syllabus
Spring 2009 URPL-GP.2638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy
This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.
Download Syllabus
Spring 2008 URPL-GP.2638.001 Housing and Community Development Policy
This course will explore a range of issues relating to U.S. housing and community development policy, including the role housing plays in building and strengthening neighborhoods and communities. Topics to be covered are the structure of housing and related financial markets; the economic and social bases for government to intervene in these markets; and the relative merits and demerits of the different tools available to intervene in these markets including: subsidization, both directly and through the tax system; regulation of financial institutions, e.g. the Community Reinvestment Act; FHA/Ginnie Mae and government sponsored enterprises; zoning; and regulation of lands and rents. The course will also examine the role of the legal system to enforce laws and regulations and set the agenda for housing and community development policy.
Download Syllabus
Date Publication/Paper
2011

Madar, J. & Willis, M.A. 2011. A Canary in the Mortgage Market? Why the recent FHA and GSE loan limit reductions deserve attention Furman Center White Paper
Abstract

On October 1, 2011, the maximum loan size eligible for Federal Housing Administration (FHA) insurance or a guarantee from Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (known as "Government-Sponsored Enterprises" or "GSEs") dropped in dozens of metropolitan areas around the country. When this change took effect, a segment of the mortgage market in each of these areas instantly lost some or all federal backing. If enough borrowers seeking loans in this segment are unable to find financing, the result will be further downward pressure on the corresponding segment of the housing market. In this report, we use recent mortgage origination data to explore some of the possible implications of this policy change for the housing market and the U.S. mortgage finance system.

In the Press

09/27/2011
'Do No Harm' on Conforming Loan Limits [Commentary]
HousingWire