Research That Matters

Both domestically and globally, research by NYU Wagner faculty examines issues of public importance with an eye to making a difference.

With the dropdown below, you can access current projects sorted by subject area.

AIG Research Fund

Jonathan J. Morduch Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Director of the Policy Specialization, Executive Director of the Financial Access Initiative

The purpose of the AIG Research Fund is to strengthen research at NYU Wagner on extending banking and insurance markets to poor and under-served markets and to support leading researchers in translating evidence into action through support of the Financial Access Initiative. The current study investigates how health insurance can affect the quality care available to poor households. This will include a quantitative review of the experience of insured and non-insured individuals while seeking treatment for a specific aliment.

Analysis and Technical Assistance in Support of Health Reform Year 4

Sherry Glied Dean, Professor of Public Service

Analysis and Technical Assistance in Support of Health Reform, Year 3

Sherry Glied Dean, Professor of Public Service

Campaign for Public Service

Paul Light Paulette Goddard Professor of Public Service

This Project is designed to help opinion leaders and policy experts explore the connection between public service excellence and successful implementation of action on urgent problems such as banking reform, economic recovery, climate change, homeland security, humanitarian aid, and educational achievement.

Casey Foundation funded project at Brookings

Paul Light Paulette Goddard Professor of Public Service

Crime Lab NYC

Patrick Sharkey Associate Professor of Sociology (NYU Department of Sociology)

CRISP: Type 1: Reductionist and Integrative Approaches to Improve the Resiliency of Multi-Scale Interdependent Critical

Rae Zimmerman Professor of Planning and Public Administration

David Bohnett Public Service Fellowships

Sherry Glied Dean, Professor of Public Service

David Bohnett Public Service Fellowships

ECHO Endocrine Project

John Billings Professor of Health Policy and Public Service, Director of Health Policy and Management Program

Health Agency of the Greater Paris Region

Victor G. Rodwin Professor of Health Policy and Management

In a recent study comparing France with the United States, we found that the rate of all-cause rehospitalization within 30 days following discharge, for the older population, 65 years and over, was 14.7% in France in 2010 (Gusmano, et al., 2014). Although the risk of rehospitalization is well documented worldwide, it is poorly understood (Boutwell, 2011; Ryan, 2012; Joynt, 2012) . One major issue is whether readmission to a hospital is a meaningful indicator of hospital performance. There is no doubt that rehospitalization has a deleterious effect on the well-being of patients, and leads to an increase in socioeconomic costs (Jencks, 2009; Carey, 2015). A better understanding of the factors associated with rehospitalizations, however, would be useful in developing strategies to reduce them. In France, an important policy issue today revolves around the challenge of coordinating health services among inpatient hospital care and community-based outpatient care (both GPs and specialists). As a consequence, more information is needed on the frequency of rehospitalization and the care pathways followed by patients following hospital discharge and readmission. We propose to address this question within Ile-de-France (IDF).

 

The study we propose will rely on the SNIIRAM database, including PMSI over the four-year period (2010-2013). It consists of two parts: 1) a descriptive component that would document, for the first time, rates of all-cause rehospitalization in IDF; and 2) an analytic component, based on logistic regression analysis, which would investigate the individual and neighborhood-level factors associated with rehospitalization.

 

The descriptive component: This study would calculate residence-based, all-cause rehospitalization rates, in IDF, for two age cohorts: 65 years and over; and 18-65 years, for each of the 502 PMSI areas and whatever aggregations of these areas would be most useful for the ARS. In addition, the study would calculate these rates for each hospital in IDF.

 

The analytic component: Based on the rehospitalization rates (residence-based for each of the 502 PMSI areas and by hospital, we would analyze, using logistic regression analysis, the factors associated with higher rehospitalization rates. From the SNIIRAM database, we would examine the following individual-level factors for all patients rehospitalized within 30 days following initial hospitalization: their discharge diagnoses and procedures, age, gender, severity of illness, and their use of health care services (GPs and specialistes) and prescription drugs during the period between their discharge and rehospitalization. From the census, for each of the territorial areas corresponding to PMSI areas, or aggregations of areas (residence-based or those within which each of the hospitals is located), we would also examine the following neighborhood-level factors: average income or deprivation indices, level of urbanization or density, human development index, density of physicians and nurses.

Health, Environmental, and Development Policy in Ghana

Karen Grépin Assistant Professor of Global Health Policy

Intelligent Paratransit Activities

Mitchell L. Moss Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy & Planning, Director of Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management

Issue Advocacy Lab

Erica Gabrielle Foldy Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management, Director of Management Specialization

The goal of Issue Advocacy Lab (Advocacy Lab for short) is to create a course providing students with the opportunity to engage in real-time organizing and advocacy on behalf of a particular issue campaign -- a robust form of service learning. Along with reading about how to engage in social change efforts, students would actually contribute to a particular campaign, through activities that could include background research on the issue and the contextual landscape, developing strategy, conducting outreach such as doorknocking and web-based approaches, and organizing community meetings or educational events. These activities would take place in the context of a course in which students would also engage in more traditional pedagogical activities, including readings, case studies, outside speakers and written assignments. While the core of Advocacy Lab will be classroom learning, the experience outside the classroom is the central innovation of the course, adding a novel component to Wagner’s already existing clinical curriculum.

JFEW Fellowship

Ellen Schall Martin Cherkasky Professor of Health Policy & Management

Jewish Foundation for Education of Women supports and funds students in the Dual Degree Program in Nonporfit Management and Jewish Studies at the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service (Wagner School). The JFEW Fellowship at NYU Wagner helps the Dual degree students gain essential skill, experiences, and contacts; at the same time, it would enable JFEW to nurture and prepare future leaders.

Mandell L. Berman Jewish Policy Archive

Steven Schall Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Administration

The goal of the The Mandell L. Berman Jewish Policy Archive (JPA) is to collect and make available online, free of charge, original research and related materials on Jewish life in North America in order to inform policy decisions in the Jewish community. JPA will help scholars, students, lay leaders, foundations, practitioners, and researchers. It will also create a platform for discussion about the major policy questions facing Jewish life in North America.

Medicaid Evaluation and Program Analysis

John Billings Professor of Health Policy and Public Service, Director of Health Policy and Management Program

Municipal-level Health Data for American Cities

Neil Kleiman Clinical Assistant Professor of Public Service

Policies for Action: Policy and Law Research to Build a Culture of Health

Sherry Glied Dean, Professor of Public Service

Public Transportation and Mandatory Evacuations Prior to Extreme Weather Events in NYC

Rae Zimmerman Professor of Planning and Public Administration

Public-Private Collaboration for Social Problem Solving: A Comparative Perspective

Sonia M. Ospina Professor of Public Management and Policy

The goal of this grant is to develop a joint course that advances interdisciplinary work between the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Stern School of Business, with Masters’ students and faculty from both schools working in collaboration and learning experientially through the lens of the latest evidence-based knowledge to solve urgent social problems in a variety of international contexts.

Public-Private Collaboration for Social Problem Solving: A Comparative Perspective

Sonia M. Ospina Associate Professor of Public Policy

The goal of this grant is to develop a joint course that advances interdisciplinary work between the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service and the Stern School of Business, with Masters students and faculty from both schools working in collaboration and learning experientially through the lens of the latest evidence-based knowledge to solve urgent social problems in a variety of international contexts.

Research on Access to Primary Care and Avoidable Hospitalizations in New York and Montreal

Victor G. Rodwin Professor of Health Policy and Management

RIPS Type 1: A Meta-Network System Framework for Resilient Analysis and Design of Modern Interdependent Critical Infrast

Rae Zimmerman Professor of Planning and Public Administration

Senior New Yorkers and Transit Accessibility

Mitchell L. Moss Henry Hart Rice Professor of Urban Policy & Planning, Director of Rudin Center for Transportation Policy & Management

Skill-Building and Industry Development through Migration

Natasha Iskander Associate Professor of Public Policy

Investigation into the relationship between the tacit skill of migrants considered low-skilled and processes of economic development. The moving question is to understand how migrants reveal, develop and deploy their skills in an industry context, and how the institutional frameworks that govern their participation in industry labor markets, in the various national settings implicated in the migration process, support or undermine their ability to make contributions to positive economic transformation.

US Financial Diaries Book Phase II

Jonathan J. Morduch Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Director of the Policy Specialization, Executive Director of the Financial Access Initiative

US Financial Diaries Book Project

Jonathan J. Morduch Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Director of the Policy Specialization, Executive Director of the Financial Access Initiative

US Financial Diaries Book

US Financial Diaries Ongoing Communications and Book Promotion

Jonathan J. Morduch Professor of Public Policy and Economics, Director of the Policy Specialization, Executive Director of the Financial Access Initiative