Inequality, Race, And Poverty

Inequality. This is one of the biggest political conversations right now. Inequality, racial discrimination, and geographic segregation are dominating the national discourse. Everyone’s asking what we can do—not just in terms of improving outcomes today, but also in terms of creating upward mobility for generations to come. Can economic growth help change poverty patterns—or are market corrections the way forward? What are the most effective pathways to overall opportunity: jobs, schools, housing, more compassionate policing, more accessible finance, healthier environments—or all of the above?

At NYU Wagner, we see every detail of the big, messy picture of inequality and poverty. Our degree programs provide students the opportunity to study health access policies, transportation plans, or optimal management practices. Our faculty examine what we can do today to change inherent biases in the way we build neighborhoods, train and promote employees, apply laws, fund schools, and design tax and transfer programs. As an NYU Wagner student, you'll understand the connections between these issues and how they affect one another. You’ll bring your experiences and perspectives to the table so that you not only shape the conversation—you also shape the solutions.

No matter what you choose to specialize in and no matter what your specific sector of interest, you, too, can make a difference when it comes to inequality. How? By addressing this issue head on. By always keeping an eye out for the people who might fall through the cracks. It’s a way of thinking that is central to how almost everyone at NYU Wagner approaches policy analysis—and how we build innovative, encompassing solutions. Maybe that’s why our alumni aren’t afraid to wade into conversations others shy away from. Maybe that’s why our graduates and faculty consistently deliver research, policies, and programs that change the way our society understands and reverses the course of inequalities, racial discrimination, and poverty.

Jacob Faber: Residential Segregation by Race—and Widening Inequality

Residential Segregation by Race—and Widening Inequality

Professor Jacob William Faber discusses his research on racial inequality and how he hopes it will change the public conversation about race and public policy.

Empowering Women, Children, and Communities

With $18, alumna Aissata Camara and her sister founded the There is No Limit Foundation, which empowers the poorest communities to reach their potential by eradicating social barriers and creating economic opportunities.

Alumni in Action: Creating Economic Opportunities for Women in Guinea

Empowering Women, Children, and Communities

With $18, alumna Aissata Camara and her sister founded the There is No Limit Foundation, which empowers the poorest communities to reach their potential by eradicating social barriers and creating economic opportunities.

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Research

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Alumni

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Brandon West
Campaign Manager, Voting Rights and Democracy
Center for Popular Democracy
Centers and Initiatives