Health

The US healthcare system is changing more dramatically now than any time in the last 50 years. The current system costs too much. Quality is too low. Access is too limited. We spend more money on our healthcare system than any other country, yet have shorter life spans and poorer health to show for it. But right now—at this very moment—we have a tremendous opportunity to improve and impact the system.

At NYU Wagner, we believe everyone should have access to healthcare. And that means access to high-quality services. We also believe that studying healthcare means seeing the whole community. Through all of our degree programs, specifically our master’s in health policy and management and our Online MHA, we look at the social conditions that affect and promote health: housing, transportation, urban development, and more. These conditions are key to effectively improving health for individuals and communities, especially for vulnerable populations—including the uninsured, the undocumented, the severely ill, the chronically ill, the impoverished, and those facing cultural and linguistic barriers.

At NYU Wagner, we strive to produce leaders capable of creating a more efficient and fair healthcare system with better health outcomes. As a graduate, you’ll have the skills and tools to change the system and improve it one step at a time. You’ll understand how management affects policy, and vice versa. And you’ll gain insight into the real impact of policies. You’ll join the ranks of NYU Wagner alumni who analyze patient satisfaction, launch and evaluate new programs, and get the word out about important services. In short, you’ll be one of the leaders making the vision of equal access and quality care a reality.

John Billings: Preventing Costly Re-Hospitalizations

Preventing Costly Re-hospitalizations

Professor John Billings researches the issues facing the healthcare delivery system. His successful project for the National Health Service (NHS) in England set up programs to prevent expensive re-hospitalizations.

Why Your Broken Rib Costs You an Arm and a Leg

Why is healthcare in the US so expensive compared to care provided in other countries with similar or better outcomes? Dean Sherry Glied's talk examines the evidence on this paradox and describes the implications of these findings for health policy.

WAGTalk: Sherry Glied, "Why Your Broken Rib Costs You an Arm and a Leg"

Why Your Broken Rib Costs You an Arm and a Leg

Why is healthcare in the US so expensive compared to care provided in other countries with similar or better outcomes? Dean Sherry Glied's talk examines the evidence on this paradox and describes the implications of these findings for health policy.

More to Explore: Health

Research

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Faculty

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Ellen Schall

Martin Cherkasky Professor of Health Policy & Management
Alumni

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Rashi Kumar

MUP
Senior Program Manager, Clinical Partnerships
Healthfirst
Rashi Kumar